Academic Support

University Writing Center

On this page:

Services and Resources

Hours and Contact Info.

SUMMER Semester Hours

  • 122 Student Success Center
    • Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–4 p.m.
    • Friday (Summer B only), 12 p.m.–4 p.m.

Appointments should be scheduled by calling or visiting the Writing Center.

Jill Tussing
Director, University Writing Center
122 Student Success Center
(937) 775-5770
writingctr@wright.edu

Writers of all skill levels can benefit from informed feedback about their writing. Wright State University provides funding so that students may have writing consultations free of charge. Our staff of trained undergraduate and graduate writing coaches from across the disciplines can provide support at any stage of your writing process. While we will not write or edit your work for you, a conversation with a writing coach can help you:

  • Discover the strengths and weaknesses in a piece of writing;
  • Understand assignment criteria;
  • Make sense of your source materials;
  • Generate and organize your ideas;
  • Develop a writing plan;
  • Formulate a thesis statement;
  • Develop your content;
  • Create compelling introductions and conclusions;
  • Learn how to properly quote and paraphrase information from sources;
  • Learn how to properly cite your sources;
  • Develop revision and editing strategies;
  • Prepare your writing for publication/presentation.

In addition to providing Personal Peer Coaching, the Writing Center also offers the following resources:

  • Mini-manuals providing basic format and citation information for APA and MLA styles
  • Twelve networked computers for word processing and research applications
  • Adaptive equipment for students with disabilities
  • A library of reference materials you can use while in the center

If you are interested in becoming a writing coach, please visit the FAQ section for details.

We hope you stop by the center to make an appointment or just walk in to see if we have a coach available.


Policies

You will need your Wright1 card to sign in for your session.

To give you ample time to develop skills and confidence, promote independent reflection and revision, and help to ensure the availability of our services to other students, we operate with the following policies:

  • You may meet with a Writing Coach for up to an hour in a day and no more than two hours in a week, schedule permitting.
    • You may break your sessions into half-hour blocks if you like.
    • Hour-long sessions consist of 50 minutes of coaching with 10 minutes allotted for paperwork. Half-hour sessions consist of 25 minutes of coaching with 5 minutes allotted for paperwork.
  • You do not need an appointment to meet with a coach. You can "walk in," and if we have a coach available, we can meet with you.
  • As a courtesy convenience, you may schedule sessions in advance.
    • We recommend coming to the center to schedule your appointments, but we will make appointments by phone.
    • Sessions start on time. Plan to arrive at least five minutes prior to your appointment. We reserve the right to give your session time to another student if you are late.
    • If you miss three appointments, you will be removed from our schedule for the remainder of the term. However, you may still use the center on a walk-in basis, and your scheduling privileges may be reinstated the following term.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Who are the writing coaches?

    All of our coaches are Wright State students. They come from a variety of disciplines including Liberal Arts, Engineering and Science, Social Science, Medicine, and more, and are prepared to help you with writing assignments from any of your courses.

  • What should I bring to my session?

    Please bring your Wright1 card (or UID and identification) to sign in. If you’re working on a paper, you may bring a hard copy or use one of our computers to access a digital copy. We also have tables with outlets if you prefer to work on your laptop. Please bring any additional materials relevant to your session (this may include a syllabus, rubric, pre-writing, research, etc.).

  • What should I do to prepare for my session?

    It is most helpful for our coaches, and most productive for your session, if you come prepared with questions, or an idea of what you’d like to discuss about your assignment. Depending on what stage of the writing process you are at, it is useful to bring any pre-writing, research, assignment instructions, feedback from your professor, or anything else that is relevant to the assignment that you’re working on.

  • Do I need to bring a hard copy of my paper?

    No—we have computers available if you’d prefer to work with a digital copy of your paper. We also have tables that are equipped with outlets if you bring a laptop, and a printer is located in the center for your use.

  • What kinds of writing can I bring to the Writing Center?

    Writing coaches can help you with a variety of writing assignments, including summaries, analyses, evaluations, narratives, research papers, technical writing, business writing, and creative writing. Coaches can also help you with personal writing, such as resumes, cover letters, or applications.

  • Will a writing coach edit my paper and fix my grammar?

    No. Our coaches use a discussion-based method of challenge and support to help you develop your skills as a writer. While we will not write or edit your work for you, a conversation with a writing coach can help you with:

    • Assignment criteria and planning
    • Research and idea generation
    • Academic reading strategies
    • Organizing and drafting
    • Formulating a thesis statement and developing content
    • Using appropriate evidence, quoting, and paraphrasing
    • Citing sources in APA, MLA, or Chicago style
    • Editing for clarity, concision, and tone
    • Mechanics, usage, and grammar
    • Proofreading strategies
    • Format and layout
    • Strategies and resources for future academic success
  • How will my instructor know that I have visited the Writing Center?

    At the end of your session, you can request that your writing coach provide you with a Visit Card that states the date, the time of your session, and the title of your assignment. You are responsible for bringing this card to your instructor.

  • How often can I come to the Writing Center?

    You may have up to 2 half-hour sessions a day (you can split them up, or combine them into a one-hour session), with a maximum of 4 half-hour sessions a week.

  • Is there a fee to use the Writing Center?

    No. The University Writing Center is free for all currently enrolled Wright State Students. In order to sign into a session, you must have a Wright1 card, or UID and identification.

  • What happens if I miss my appointment?

    If you are unable to make it to your appointment, please call the Writing Center at (937) 775-4186. Your appointment may count as a No-Show if:

    • You don't show up for your appointment without calling
    • You arrive past your appointment time and your coach has started working with another student
    • You arrive past your appointment time and decide to wait until the next session block

    After three No-Shows, you will not be able to schedule any more appointments for the remainder of the semester. You may still use the Writing Center on a walk-in basis.

  • Can a writing coach help me with MS Word, MS PowerPoint, and other software?

    Our writing coaches are not specifically trained on handling software questions. However, your coach may be able to answer any basic software questions that he/she feels familiar with. For more help with MS Word and other software, please visit the hoonuit webpage for tutorials. 

  • How can I become a writing coach?

    To qualify to work as a writing coach, applicants must:

    • Be at or above sophomore status
    • Have a minimum 3.0 GPA
    • Complete ENG 1100 with an 'A' or 'B'
    • Complete the application packet (can be picked up in the Writing Center- 122 SC)

Style Guides

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is a Style Guide?

    A style guide shows you how to properly document your research and format your paper.

  • Why do I need a Style Guide?

    The short answer: because your instructor wants you to.

    Style Guides are important because they define a standard. Following the standard ensures that your paper is professional-looking and readable. It helps your instructor easily find important information like your name, your class, and your sources. Instructors read a lot of student papers each quarter. Having a standard format for papers keeps them from having to interpret a different style for each person which saves a lot of time.

  • Which Style Guide should I use?

    The choice of style guide is often determined by what class you are in. Ask your instructor, check your syllabus, or refer to the assignment description to find out which style guide your instructor wants you to use.

    The most commonly used style guides for your classes include MLA, APA, and Turabian (based on the Chicago Manual of Style).

  • Where can I get a Style Guide?

    Most bookstores, including the University Bookstore, carry these manuals.

    Since you will likely need one or more of these references in your college career, we highly recommend you purchase a copy of the style guide required for your major. While buying your own copy may seem an unwelcome expense, properly documenting your sources is very important and can be quite challenging. These publications are the most complete resources available for proper documentation and can provide valuable guidance.

  • What if I can't afford to buy a Style Guide?

    The Writing Center has copies of the most common academic style guides. You are welcome to use these resources on your own in the center, or you may ask at the front desk to see if a consultant is available to assist you. Copies of these guides can also be found at the University Library reference desk and at most local libraries.

    The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) offers online resources for working with MLA and APA citation and documentation styles. You can view these resources by clicking on the links above. Some of the materials, including samples papers, will require you to download the Adobe Acrobat Reader if you don't already have it. 

    The University of Chicago Press also offers an online resource for The Chicago Manual of Style. The site features a Q&A section that is updated monthly by the manuscript editors. You can click on the Tools link to view some examples of Chicago-style documentation. The Tools section also contains a useful Quick Guide. You can also register to use their Search tool. The text of the Manual is not freely available; however, the search tool returns the relevant paragraph numbers for the physical book, so it is helpful when used with the manual.

  • How do I use a Style Guide?

    A style guide is a reference work. Use the index to find specific information and the Table of Contents to find general sections of information.

    A style guide is something you learn as you go. Even the experts need to look things up constantly. Style guides provide a lot of information and many examples, but they can't cover every documentation situation. On occasion, you will need to make choices about how to apply the rules. When in doubt, ask your instructor or talk to a Writing Center tutor. In time, the more common documentation and formatting requirements will become second nature.

  • Isn't there a shortcut to using a Style Guide?

    Not really, no. Mastering a style guide is a matter of using it. Just like the experts, you will need to look things up often. Don't let that fact intimidate you. You can almost always find the information you need if you just have the patience to look for it.

    There are a number of internet sites that offer automated assistance with documentation styles. We have not provided any links to them here because, by and large, these services often produce inaccurate listings. However, if you feel the need, it shouldn't take you long to find these resources using your favorite search engine. These automated tools may be able to produce a first draft of a Works Cited or Reference page, but they almost never get it perfect. Remember to check your work using your style manual.

Samples and Manuals