Coronavirus Update

Classes will be held remotely for the remainder of the spring semester, and all official university events and student activities are suspended until further notice. While the Dayton and Lake campuses remain open, access to campus is restricted to personnel who have been identified as essential. Read more.

Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

On this page:

Overview

To protect the health and well-being of the Wright State University community, we are monitoring the Coronavirus Disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. This website provides information about the situation and Wright State’s response.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is responding to an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by the Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Wright State and Student Health Services at Wright State Physicians are responding to the situation, along with the Ohio Departments of Health and Higher Education and the Greene County Public Health Department. Cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in Ohio.


Frequently Asked Questions

Campus information

  • Is Wright State holding classes remotely during the spring semester? (added 3/13)

    Wright State University has extended the remote instruction timeframe through the end of the spring semester. This is in line with nearly every other state institution and will provide clarity on expectations going forward through the final six weeks of the spring semester. Students should therefore factor this new information into their decision-making processes.

  • Are university events and student activities suspended?

    Wright State has canceled or postponed all university events and student activities until further notice. All Wright State athletic competitions are also suspended indefinitely.

    View a non-exhaustive list of events canceled or postponed due to coronavirus precautions. Contact the Social Media team for any additions.

  • What is the status of spring commencement?

    Commencement is how we come together to celebrate the accomplishments of our graduating seniors and graduate students. The current COVID-19 situation, which has resulted in statewide executive orders limiting large gatherings, has disrupted much of our planning around our May 2, 2020, traditional commencement ceremony.

    We must, therefore, postpone the ceremony until the situation resolves to the point that such events are permitted. To be sure, the university WILL hold a graduation celebration for the class of 2020, on a date yet to be determined.

    To that end, the Dayton Campus is seeking thoughts and ideas from Student Government and will formulate more detailed plans moving forward. The Lake Campus is also coordinating plans to seek student input.

    Caps and gowns

    Any online order of caps and gowns that have already been placed by a student, as well as orders going forward though the Wright State’s Barnes & Noble Bookstores can be fully refunded in the event that a physical graduation does not occur. In addition, there is no need for a student to pre-order a cap and gown because Wright State’s bookstores will carry a supply of caps and gowns up until graduation.

  • What support is the university providing to students? (updated 3/19)

    March 19, 2020

     

    Academic Success Centers

    All academic support has moved to remote service, in an effort to significantly minimize groups gathering on campus. We will not conduct face-to-face academic support sessions until further notice. 

    All student appointments will be offered remotely. Delivery methods may vary by service.

    Student staff should report to work remotely only.

    Student Success Suites (University Academic Advising and Career Services)

    All academic and career advising has moved to remote service, in an effort to significantly optimize social distancing. We will not conduct face-to-face academic and career advising sessions until further notice.

    Academic and career advising appointments will be conducted via video conferencing, email, or telephone.

    Placement Testing

    All math placements tests scheduled for the Dayton Campus are canceled until further notice. Alternate online remote testing will be announced by March 25. Thank you for your patience as we create secure placement testing opportunities for students.

    Writing placement testing continues as normal through remote online submission.

  • How can I reach RaiderConnect? (added 3/20)

    RaiderConnect staff will begin working remotely on Monday, March 23. Services will continue virtually to support to students, parents and alumni.

    Students and parents can leave a voicemail message at 937-775-4000 with a request for a return phone call.

    They may also email us at raiderconnect@wright.edu with questions or requests for a phone or video conference.

    Emails and phone messages will be returned as quickly as possible, with every effort to respond the same business day. Raider Connect staff will monitor documents received via fax and U.S. mail twice daily. Staff have either forwarded their extensions to their personal phones or will check messages frequently.

  • What remote library services are available? (added 3/17)

    Ask A Librarian online chat and email service: Open Monday through Thursday, 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.; Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

    Ask An Archivist online chat and email service are open Monday through Friday, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

    Research Guides: start your library research using a custom guide for your discipline or class and contact your subject librarian for assistance.

    Research Toolkit Workshops: Our online workshops explain some of the foundational concepts of information literacy that help students in their library research. A variety of videos are also explaining different library processes and procedures available at https://libraries.wright.edu/selfhelp.

  • Is the Raider Food Pantry open? (updated 3/27)

    The Raider Food Pantry is closed through April 6, while Wright State's Dayton campus is closed to non-essential personnel. If you are student in need of emergency assistance, please call (937) 260-0167.

    Other local food resources include:

    • The United Way 211 Helplink (dial 211) can also assist in finding local food pantries that are able to remain open.

    Note: Things are changing rapidly, so please contact or visit the page of the organizations that are listed for the most current information.

  • Can I make a donation to help students? (added 3/24)

    The Wright State University Foundation established the Student Emergency Relief Campaign to assist students during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The campaign includes emergency relief-related funds that can make an immediate impact in critical areas of need for students. Give Now.

    Details on how students can apply for assistance will be announced soon. Assistance will be based on funds available.

  • How can students apply for assistance from Wright State's Student Emergency Relief Campaign? (added 4/6)

    The Wright State University Foundation created the Wright State Student Emergency Relief Campaign to raise funds for students negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of our donors contributed to the Katie Deedrick Student Support Fund. These contributions will be utilized to assist students with food, toiletries, medications, and other supplies and with travel expenses for students returning to their homes outside of the area.

    Students may now begin applying for assistance from the Katie Deedrick Student Support Fund. This fund provides one-time support to eligible Wright State students currently enrolled at the Dayton or Lake campuses with demonstrated financial need.

    Applications will be considered only while funds are still available.

    APPLY NOW

    If you have questions about the application process or the Katie Deedrick Student Support Fund, please contact Destinee Biesemeyer, associate director for student advocacy and wellness, at studentadvocacyandwellness@wright.edu.

Health, Wellness, and Prevention

  • Has COVID-19 spread through the community of Ohio? (updated 3/16)

    Public health experts have estimated up to 1% of the population could be infected after identifying multiple cases of community spread of coronavirus. The estimates consider that:

    • Testing is limited.
    • Most individuals that have the disease are asymptomatic or have mild symptoms.
    • The incubation period can be up to 14 days so people are incubating the illness and aren’t showing symptoms.
    • We know that this virus is highly transmissible.

    Based on how quickly the virus multiplies and infects people and based on the modeling, we can extrapolate that there are thousands of Ohioans who may already have been infected. We know that sounds extremely scary but please consider that the majority of people who have this illness will experience mild or moderate symptoms. They won’t require testing. And they will be prescribed treatment to help ease their symptoms. For fever, we will give Tylenol or acetaminophen. For coughs, they likely will take cough medicine and cough drops.

    A smaller number of cases will have severe infections that will require hospitalization. That’s why individuals need to be vigilant in monitoring symptoms and reach out to a healthcare provider if symptoms worsen. Individuals with shortness of breath or a high fever should see a provider.

    That healthcare provider will use clinical judgment combined with a medical evaluation and history to decide if testing is necessary. Testing requires a doctor’s order.

    Not everyone needs to be tested.

    As part of efforts to stem the spread of the virus, the state of Ohio has implemented multiple preventive measures including: Closing schools, limiting mass gatherings, encouraging proper cleaning and handwashing, etc. to help reduce the impact of coronavirus. These measures will slow the spread of the virus and will reduce the impact on our healthcare system. Read more.

  • How likely am I to catch COVID-19?

    The risk depends on where you are – and more specifically, whether there is a Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak unfolding there.

    For most people in most locations, the risk of catching COVID-19 is still low. According to the Centers for Disease Control, older people and people of all ages with severe underlying health conditions — like heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes, for example — seem to be at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness.

    However, there are now places around the world (cities or areas) where the disease is spreading. For people living in, or visiting, these areas, the risk of catching COVID-19 is higher. Governments and health authorities are taking vigorous action every time a new case of COVID-19 is identified. Be sure to comply with any local restrictions on travel, movement, or large gatherings. Cooperating with disease control efforts will reduce your risk of catching or spreading COVID-19.

    COVID-19 outbreaks can be contained and transmission stopped, as has been shown in China and some other countries. Unfortunately, new outbreaks can emerge rapidly. It’s important to be aware of the situation where you are or intend to go.

    The World Health Organizations publishes daily updates on the COVID-19 situation worldwide.

  • What are the symptoms of COVID-19? (Updated 3/27)

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides information about symptoms, including a Coronavirus Self-Checker at cdc.gov/COVID19-symptoms.

    This chart from the Ohio Department of Health compares the symptoms of COVID-19, colds, and flu.

  • What should I do if I have respiratory symptoms?

    If you have symptoms of fever, cough, and/or difficulty breathing, you should: 



    • Call your primary health care provider or Student Health Services before you go to a doctor's office or emergency room and tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms. 


    • Wright State University students may call Student Health Services at (937) 245-7200, Option 1, Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., or contact their preferred primary care provider. Lake Campus students, faculty, and staff may contact Health and Wellness Services at beth.wells@wright.edu, or reach out to their family physician, local health department, or pharmacy for more information.
    • The Greene County Health Department may also offer advice by phone and can be contacted at (937) 374-5600. For Lake Campus personnel or students, the Mercer County Health District can be reached at (419) 586-3251.
    • Avoid contact with others. 


    • Do not travel while sick. Please do not get on public transportation or just arrive at a clinic or doctor’s office. Student Health Services offers advise by phone to help save students a trip to Wright State Physicians or the emergency department. Call Student Health Services at (937) 245-7200.
    • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing. Discard the tissue immediately.
    • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with an alcohol content of at least 60% if soap and water are not available.
  • What should I do if I feel sick?
    • Stay home.
    • Monitor your symptoms closely. Take your temperature daily.
      • If you have a fever, call a health care professional.
      • If you live in Dayton campus housing, contact Student Health Services or your preferred primary care provider. Lake Campus faculty, staff, and students may contact Health and Wellness Services or reach out to their preferred primary care provider.
      • Stay home from school and work until at least 72 hours after your fever ends, without the use of fever-reducing medications. If you must go out of the house or be around others, wear a mask and avoid close contact. Be especially careful around people who have compromised immune systems, underlying health conditions and/or are age 60 and older.
    • Take care of yourself. Rest as much as possible. Drink plenty of fluids.
    • Practice good hygiene:
      • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol. Always wash your hands if visibly dirty.
      • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      • Stay home when you are sick.
      • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
      • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • I may have been exposed to COVID-19, but I do not have any symptoms, what should I do?

    If you had close contact* with a person with confirmed COVID-19, but you do not have any symptoms (fever, coughing, shortness of breath):

    • Stay at home for 14 days after your last contact with the ill person. Do not go to school or work. Avoid public places.
    • During the 14 days, monitor your health for fever, cough, and shortness of breath.
    • Notify your supervisor that you are ill and will not be able to work.
    • Seek medical advice from a medical professional by calling ahead before visiting a health facility.

    *Close contact is defined as being within approximately 6 feet of a person with confirmed COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time, or having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed on) without wearing personal protective equipment.

  • I may have been exposed to COVID-19, and I have respiratory symptoms, what should I do?

    If you develop symptoms of COVID-19 infection — such as a fever, cough or shortness of breath — within 14 days of your return from travel to a country with a CDC Level 3 Travel Health Notice (China, South Korea, Iran, and Italy as of March 9, 2020) OR have been in close contact* with someone who has confirmed COVID-19, please take the steps listed below.

    Call your health provider in advance. Please do not show up at a clinic, urgent care or other health facility without calling first. Your provider will need to take special measures to protect other people in the clinic. Telemedicine may also be available, enabling you to consult a provider from home.

    If you live in Dayton campus housing, contact Student Health Services or your preferred primary care provider. Lake Campus faculty, staff, and students may contact Health and Wellness Services or reach out to their preferred primary care provider.

    *Close contact is defined as being within approximately 6 feet of a person with confirmed COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time, or having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed on) without wearing personal protective equipment.

  • I have COVID-19 symptoms but have not been around anyone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19. What should I do?
    • The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough, and shortness of breath. These can be symptoms of other respiratory illnesses as well as COVID-19.
    • If you are in a high-risk category, and have symptoms of COVID-19, call your healthcare provider for advice. If you are at risk for serious illness, your healthcare provider may arrange a test for COVID-19.
    • If you do not have a high-risk condition and your symptoms are mild, you do not need to be tested for COVID-19. Do not go out when you are sick, practice excellent hygiene, and wear a facemask when you are around other people if you can.
    • Cover coughs and sneezes. Avoid sharing personal household items. Clean your hands often. Clean all “high-touch” surfaces like doorknobs often.
    • Monitor your symptoms and call your health care provider if symptoms worsen.
    • Stay home and avoid others for 72 hours after your fever goes down and symptoms get better.

    *High Risk – older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease).

  • How do I help prevent the spread of viruses, including coronavirus?
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol. Always wash your hands if visibly dirty.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • What's the difference between symptoms of COVID-19, colds, and flu? (added 3/20)
  • How can I access Apple's COVID-19 Screening Tool?

    Download the free app from Apple’s App Store.

    Or access the screening tool online at www.apple.com/covid19.

    Apple Inc. – in partnership with the White House Coronavirus Task Force and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – released an app and website that guides Americans through a series of questions about their health and exposure to determine if they should seek care for COVID-19 symptoms. The tool provides CDC recommendations on next steps including guidance on social distancing and self-isolating, how to closely monitor symptoms, recommendations on testing, and when to contact a medical provider.

    Read the CDC statement on the COVID-19 Apple App.

About Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

  • What is a Coronavirus?

    Coronaviruses are common throughout the world, and while most are known to cause mild to moderate illness, two have been known to cause severe illness. The elderly, people with underlying health problems, and people who have compromised immune systems are at greater risk than those who are younger and healthier.

    The CDC website includes detailed information about coronaviruses, how they spread, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  • Where can I call to get more information about COVID-19? (added 3/26)

    If you have questions about Coronavirus (COVID-19), call:

    • Ohio Department of Health's Call Center toll free at 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634). Open seven days a week from 9 a.m. – 8 p.m.
    • Dayton and Montgomery County Public Health's COVID-19 Hot Line at (937) 225-6217. Open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Prevention Tips

Anyone remaining on campus is encouraged to actively practice preventive measures, including appropriate social distancing and good hygiene practices. Please continue to employ these preventive practices to help curtail the spread of all respiratory viruses::

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol. Always wash your hands if they are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Talk to your doctor or nurse if you feel seriously ill, especially if you have a fever. Avoid contact with other people while you are sick.

 


Wright State Coronavirus News

Virtual presence

Wright State offering new virtual tour of campus to enhance experience
Prospective students can check out Wright State with a robust virtual campus tour that features photos, videos and student ambassadors to serve as guides.

Refunds and credits for the spring semester

Wright State's goal is to issue all refunds for all eligible students by the end of April.

Many library resources and services available to support remote learning

University Libraries staff are committed to supporting the success of Wright State students, faculty and staff during this time.

 


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