Office of Disability Services (ODS)

Online Resources and Tips

On this page:

Arts

  • VSA
    VSA, the international organization on arts and disability, was founded more than 35 years ago by Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith to provide arts and education opportunities for people with disabilities and increase access to the arts for all. With 52 international affiliates and a network of nationwide affiliates, VSA is providing arts and education programming for youth and adults with disabilities around the world.
     
  • VSA Ohio
    VSA Ohio is a community that connects inspired artists with their passion, service providers with resources, and all citizens with creative opportunities. By bridging arts and disability, our programs and services constantly evolve to provide inclusive environments and accessible opportunities for people with disabilities to celebrate life through the arts.
     
  • We Care Arts
    We Care Arts is a place where people with disabilities learn independence and build self esteem. Those with emotional, mental and/or physical disabilities can come to the facility and create artwork, which fosters confidence and empowerment.

Blind and Visual Impairments

Established in 1911, Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired is the only private, not-for-profit organization in our community with a long and respected tradition of offering comprehensive services for persons with vision loss, from young children to older adults. Our services are provided by qualified, certified instructors and staff with highly specialized skills.

The Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired assists more than 4,000 persons annually providing rehabilitation, counseling, employment, and information services to help people who are blind, visually impaired or print impaired to live more independently.


Deaf and Hard of Hearing

  • Clark County Deaf Community 
    The mission of the Clark County Deaf Community is to provide a Deaf-run Community Center in Clark County, Ohio. Its purpose is to provide a place for family-friendly deaf social and educational activities that is open to the Deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing.
     
  • Columbus Speech and Hearing Center
    Columbus Speech and Hearing Center is the largest provider of outpatient speech and hearing services in central Ohio. Their mission is "to help all people improve communication and vocational independence...for life." Serving people of all ages and from all walks of life, they impact the lives of more than 8,000 clients every year, offering a wide variety of programs and services through:
    • Audiology and Hearing Aid Services
    • Speech-Language Therapy
    • CPD
       
  • Deaf Community Resource Center
    The Mission of the Deaf Community Resource Center is to be a safe haven where services are provided for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and their families by the Deaf with Hard of Hearing and hearing allies.

     
  • Deaf World Against Violence Everywhere (DWAVE)
    DWAVE' s mission is to promote the empowerment of and equality for Ohio’s diverse Deaf, Deaf-Blind, and Hard of Hearing communities by offering culturally affirmative advocacy and education, while inspiring community accountability, in response to oppression and relationship and sexual violence. DWAVE is a Deaf-run agency offering services to individuals, education to agencies, and advocacy to systems from a Deaf perspective.  DWAVE provides: culturally affirmative advocacy and support to survivors of relationship or sexual violence within Ohio's Deaf and Hard of Hearing community.  
     
  • Hearing, Speech and Deaf Center of Greater Cincinnati
    The Hearing Speech and Deaf Center of Greater Cincinnati strengthens our community through advocacy and by supporting individuals and families to overcome obstacles to communication.

    As a premier community resource with a reputation for excellence, the Hearing Speech and Deaf Center of Greater Cincinnati believes that communication is the foundation of all human interactions.

Education

Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD)

AHEAD is a professional membership organization for individuals involved in the development of policy and in the provision of quality services to meet the needs of persons with disabilities involved in all areas of higher education.

Transition Guides and Resources for Students with Disabilities and their Families


Emergency

Earthquake Preparedness Guide for People with Disabilities and Other Access or Functional Needs (PDF) by The Great ShakeOut (Earthquake Country Alliance)

The Great Central U.S. ShakeOut

Federal, state, and local emergency management experts and other official preparedness organizations all agree that "Drop, Cover, and Hold On" is the appropriate action to reduce injury and death during earthquakes. The ShakeOut is our opportunity to practice how to protect ourselves during earthquakes. This page explains what to do-- and what not to do.


Interpreting and Captioning

  • Community Services for the Deaf
    Since 1978, Community Services for the Deaf (CSD) has provided a wide variety of programs and services to meet the needs of people who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing, including interpreting/communication services through ASL, C-Print and other non-verbal languages, ASL classes, community education and advocacy.  CSD also offers mental health counseling and case management services provided by licensed and skilled professionals with experience working with those impacted by hearing loss.  Services are also available for family members, service providers, businesses, individuals, groups and communities. 
     
  • Interpreters of the Deaf
    Interpreters of the Deaf is the region's only Deaf-owned and operated sign language interpreting and C-Print captioning service. ID's owners have over 40 years of personal and professional experience in Deaf-related work. As Deaf consumers, they have first-hand experience, knowledge and a "Deaf" perspective about how interpreting and captioning services should be provided.

Ohio

  • Access Center for Independent Living (ACIL) 
    The Access Center for Independent Living is one of 12 Centers for Independent Living in Ohio. ACIL works with individuals in Montgomery, Clark, Preble, and Greene Counties. ACIL provides advocacy, information and referral, independent living skills training, peer support, and community transition support. They also have an assistive technology lending program, Recycled Equipment Donated for Independence (REDI).
     
  • The Arc of Ohio  
    The mission of The Arc of Ohio is to advocate for human rights, personal dignity and community participation of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, through legislative and social action, information and education, local chapter support and family involvement.
     
  • Disability Rights Ohio
    Disability Rights Ohio is a non-profit corporation with a mission to advocate for the human, civil and legal rights of people with disabilities in Ohio. Disability Rights Ohio provides legal advocacy and rights protection to a wide range of people with disabilities. This includes assisting individuals with problems such as abuse, neglect, discrimination, access to assistive technology, special education, housing, employment, community integration, voting and rights protection issues. 
     
  • Ohio Department of Jobs & Family Services HOME Choice Program
    HOME Choice assists older adults and persons with disabilities to move from long-term services and support systems to home and community-based settings.
     
  • Ohio Voter Access Guide
    Voters with Disabilities can find out how to register to vote, vote absentee, vote curbside. There is also information on accessible voting locations and equipment, assistance at the voting locations, and ADA and disability resources.
     
  • Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (formerly Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission)
    OOD has created partnerships with outstanding service providers across the state; OOD's resource page provides an extensive list of Ohio service provider websites and also publications offered by OOD.
     
  • People First Ohio
    People First of Ohio helps to set up local chapters of people with disabilities who are self-advocates.

Parents

  • Ohio State Support Teams
    Ohio’s state support system includes State Support Teams who use a connected set of tools to improve instructional practice and student performance on a continuing basis. Serving a cluster of counties in Ohio, each regional state support team aims to impact students achievement by providing structures, supports and resources for schools, communities and families.
     
  • Open Letter to Parents of Students with Disabilities who Are about to Enter College (PDF)
    This letter, written by proud mother Jane Jarrow, is a must-read for all parents whose children are about to enter college!
     
  • Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities
    The Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities (OCECD) is a statewide nonprofit organization that serves families of infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities in Ohio, educators and agencies who provide services to them.

    OCECD’s programs help parents become informed and effective representatives for their children in all educational settings. In addition, youth are assisted to advocate for themselves. Through knowledge about laws, resources, rights and responsibilities, families are better able to work with agencies to ensure that appropriate services are received for the benefit of their children. 

Recreation

  • Adaptive Sports Program of Ohio
    An organization established to promote the health and wellness of individuals with physical disabilities by providing competitive and recreational adaptive sport opportunities throughout the State of Ohio.
     
  • Recreation Unlimited
    The mission of Recreation Unlimited is to provide year-round programs in sports, recreation and education for individuals with disabilities and health concerns, while building self-confidence, self-esteem and promoting positive human relations, attitudes, and behaviors.

Resource Guides

  • Disability.gov 
    Managed by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), Disability.gov streamlines more than 18,000 resources from the federal, state and local levels. Comprehensive information is available on topics such as education, getting health care, finding a job, paying for housing and more. Visitors can also follow the site on Twitter, Facebook and its blog to receive timely updates on changes that may directly impact them.
     
  • Spastic Cerebral Palsy
    Cerebral Palsy Guide provides information on all types of cerebral palsy including spastic cerebral palsy. Spastic cerebral palsy is the most common type and causes muscle tightness, making walking difficult. This site offers information on treatment options for students suffering from spastic cerebral palsy.

Service Animals


Technology

  • AbleData
    AbleData provides objective information about assistive technology products and rehabilitation equipment. AbleData does not sell or endorse any particular company or products, but they provide plenty resources and reviews of products.
     
  • Access Center for Independent Living (ACIL)
    ACIL offers an assistive technology lending program, Recycled Equipment Donated for Independence (REDI).
     
  • Assistive Tech
    A national organization whose mission is to "provide access to information on AT devices and services as well as other community resources for people with disabilities and the general public."
     
  • Assistive Technology of Ohio
    AT Ohio's mission is to "help Ohioans with disabilities learn about or acquire assistive technology. Assistive Technology refers to devices, equipment or services that assist individuals with disabilities to function independently in the areas of work, home or school. We offer several programs and services to achieve that goal. We also keep up with current legislative activity that affects persons with disabilities, and educate legislators about the needs and concerns of citizens with disabilities."

    Learn about the assistive technology device lending library.
     
  • Goodwill Easter Seals of Miami Valley
    GESMV offers an Assistive Technology Services program, providing people with many services and equipment at no cost to those served. Those interested can also donate to GESMV to extend additional opportunities to utilize the assistive technology lending program.

    GESMV also lends assistive living medical equipment to anyone in need. We offer wheelchairs, commodes, walkers, crutches and more free of charge in this temporary loan program. Short-term loans of equipment are for up to three months.

    Read more about the GESMV medical equipment lending program.
     
  • Web Accessibility Guidelines
    This guidebook, created by Portland College, includes tips and best practices on website accessibility; instructions to create accessible media, like PowerPoints, Google Slides, Word Documents and Google Docs, PDFs, video and audio, etc.; an outline of accessibility requirements and obligations; and training and support resources.

Transportation

  • Greater Dayton RTA
    The Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority (RTA) is the public transit agency that citizens count on in Montgomery County and western Greene County. There are over 3,300 stops on 31 routes throughout the region. All RTA buses include bike racks and are wheelchair accessible. You can now track your ride from your computer or mobile device using RTA's new Ride Time App! Learn more at RTA's Ride Time page.
     
  • Greater Dayton RTA: Project Mobility
    Project Mobility is a curb-to-curb paratransit service, provided to certified individuals with disabilities who are unable to use regular fixed routes. Individuals wishing to use Project Mobility must complete an application and then set up an assessment appointment. The Project Mobility Certification Center can be reached at (937) 426-8444

    Online Application

    Instructional Videos:
  • Greene CATS 
    To schedule a ride, call 937.562.6466 or toll free at 877.227.2287. For more information contact Ken Collier, Executive Director, at (937) 562-6463
     
  • Miami Valley Ride Finder
    Ride Finder is designed to provide contact information as well as general information about transportation providers in your area and around the Miami Valley.
     
  • MobilityWorks Van Rentals
    MobilityWorks of Cincinnati specializes in wheelchair accessible vehicles and adaptive driving equipment. Daily and weekly rental vans can be found by clicking on the link above.
     
  • Rob's Rescue
    Facilitates special needs emergency transportation and care for people with mobility limitations. The mission of Rob's Rescue is "To enhance the effectiveness, safety, and sensitivity of the emergency response process for people with special and atypical emergency needs and individuals who are morbidly obese through specialized training, patient information, and equipment."

Vocational

  • AAPD Summer Internship Program
    Since 2002, the AAPD Summer Internship Program has developed the next generation of leaders with disabilities and offered host employers access to a talented, diverse workforce. Each summer, AAPD places college students, graduate students, law students, and recent graduates with all types of disabilities in paid 10-week summer internships in Congressional offices, federal agencies, non-profit and for-profit organizations in the Washington, DC area. Each intern is matched with a mentor who will assist them with their career goals. AAPD provides the interns with a stipend, transportation to and from Washington, DC, and fully-accessible housing.

    For more information and to apply, please visit http://www.aapd.com/what-we-do/employment/internship-program/.

    Applications and supporting documents must be submitted to internships@aapd.com by Friday, January 15, 2016 at 5 p.m. EST.
     
  • AccessComputing
    AccessComputing, a National Science Foundation funded project, aims to increase the participation of people with disabilities in computing careers. Once again, AccessComputing has funding for students with disabilities to participate in summer internships. Students participate in both research internships as well as non-research internships.  As we all know, internship experience is important as students move on to the next steps of their careers.

    Students with disabilities who are interested in summer internships are encouraged to fill out the form at: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/blaser/283622 Through applying for an internship, students will have the opportunity become AccessComputing student team members.  Student team members engage in online mentoring and are eligible to request funding for internships, travel to conferences, and tutoring.

    Learn more about AccessComputing by checking out our latest Opportunities! newsletter that helps students with disabilities learn about careers in computing, locate resources, and learn about opportunities for students with disabilities.

    For more information or help with the application, contact Brianna Blaser at blaser@uw.edu
     
  • Workforce Recruitment Program
    The Workforce Recruitment Program is a federal program to assist students with disabilities in connecting with federal internships and employment.  In order to participate in this program, you must register with your campus recruiter (Angie Bonza in ODS) in the month of September.
     
  • Ohio Higher Ed Internships and Co-Ops Page
     
  • USAJobs for Students and Recent Graduates

Professional Dress for Students with Disabilities

Many of the guidelines below are specific to students with disabilities. For additional guidelines on professional appearance, visit the Career Services website. If you are interested in getting more help finding professional clothes, please contact Clothes That Work.

All Candidates

  • Hygiene is an important part of a first impression. Make sure that your body and hair are clean. 
  • Carry your resumes in a professional-looking folder or portfolio.
  • Minimize the amount of items you are carrying.
    • Use a single briefcase or messenger bag. Leave unneccessary items at home or hang them on the coat rack. (WSU is not responsible for lost items.)
  • If you will have an attendant with you, ask them to dress professionally, as well.
  • If you arrive with friends, visit employers separately and regroup with finished networking. Career fairs are not a team sport!
  • Clean all of your mobility equipment.
    • Make sure no mud, strings, airport tags, stickers, etc. are on your chair/scooter/cane, etc.
  • Don't forget your service dog! A bath, brushing, and clean equipment is important preparation.

Males

This list represents the minimum guidelines for males attending an interview. For additional guidelines on professional appearance, visit the Career Services website.

  • Conservative haircut
  • Clean shaven or well-groomed facial hair
  • Minimal to no jewelry (remove piercings, if possible)
  • Dark suit, clean and ironed (choose matching jacket and pants in black, navy, charcoal, gray, etc. Unusual colors, distracting patterns, or "trendy" styles not recommended.)
  • Conservative collared, button-down dress shirt, ironed
  • Conservative tie (no distracting images, cartoons, etc.)
  • No cologne/aftershave
  • Dark-colored socks
  • Polished dress shoes

Females

This list represents the minimum guidelines for males attending an interview. For additional guidelines on professional appearance, visit the Career Services website.

  • Hair clean, conservatively styled and colored
  • Minimal makeup; no bold colors
  • Minimal to no jewelry (one small earring in each ear, remove all other piercings, if possible)
  • Dark suit, clean and ironed (choose black, navy, charcoal, gray, etc. Unusual colors, distracting patterns, or "trendy" styles not recommended.)
  • Conservative blouse or button-down shirt; nothing low-cut or gapping between the buttons, no busy prints
  • Clean, ironed pants or skirt (2 inches above the knee or longer)
  • No perfume/body spray
  • Dark-colored socks with pants or neutral nylons with a skirt
  • Closed-toe dress shoes; heels no higher than 3 inches

Wright State

  • Career Services
    Career Services offers many services for students and alumni seeking to develop career and life planning skills, acquire experience, master job search strategies, and seek rewarding employment. Services include:
    • Career Exploration
    • Part-time Student Employment
    • Cooperative Education and Internships
    • Career Employment Job Search and Development
       
  • Counseling and Wellness Services (CWS)
    CWS offers a wide range of therapeutic services, including individual, group, couples, and family therapy to registered Wright State University students. CWS is open 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Intake appointments are offered on a walk-in basis Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Wednesdays. CWS is closed in accordance with all Wright State University policies. Contact CWS at (937) 775-3407.

    Students with Disabilities Group
    A confidential group for students with disabilities, where a spirit of community, identity, and success is fostered. The group is facilitated by Dr. Julie Williams in Counseling & Wellness. For more information, please contact Counseling and Wellness Services at (937) 775-3407.
     
  • Disability Parking
    A campus parking pass is required to park in any university parking lot (except visitor lots). To qualify for disability access parking, a disability parking placard or plates must be displayed along with a valid campus parking pass. Disability parking placard/plates are issued by the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. For more information on campus parking, please visit the Parking and Transportation page.
     
  • Raider Cares
    Raider Cares is Counseling and Wellness Services’ 24-hour crisis phone service.  The Raider Cares line is staffed by off-site mental health professionals providing emotional support, assistance, crisis intervention and suicide prevention to current Wright State University students experiencing emotional distress. Call Raider Cares at 855.224.2887 (TTY: 855.327.9151)
     
  • Student Academic Success Center
    SASC's academic services are intended to enhance students' opportunities for continued and sustained academic success and ease students' transition from high school to college.
     
  • Student Health Services
    Student Health Services is your on-campus source for primary health care and wellness services. SHS provides acute and primary care services, promotes health awareness, educates students about preventive care, disease management and therapeutic choices, and helps students develop the skills to manage their own health.
     
  • Student Support Services
    As advocates for students' success, the Office of Student Support Services provides individualized attention and assistance with the resolution of student and family concerns and complaints. Student Support Services also provides alcohol and other drug education and prevention, sexual assault education and prevention, and other prevention programming.