COURSE INFORMATION

EC 200 | EC 202 | EC 203 | EC 441 | EC 442
EC 641 | EC 642 | EC 722

EC 200
Economic Life
Course description  This course is designed to introduce economics to non-business majors.  It offers students a broad knowledge of economic issues and institutions relevant to the contemporary world, and provides them with the basic rules for efficient decision making for households and business firms.  Topics include supply and demand, costs, profits, fiscal and monetary policies.  Special attention is paid to international economic relations.
Who should take the course? This course can be used to satisfy a General Education requirement at Wright State University
What are the prerequisites? None
How many exams? Two midterms (30% each) and one final exam (40%).  Each is a mixture of True/False and Multiple Choice questions
Papers? Homework? EC 200 is a writing intensive course. There will be two short papers (about 5 pages each), no graded homework
Textbook Irvin B. Tucker, III, Survey of Economics (2nd Edition) South-Western Publishing Company
What about class attendance? Students must sign attendance sheet for every session.  Attendance records will be taken into consideration when exam scores fall in borderline cases.
Grades Two grades will be issued for this course.  One grade (Pass/No Entry) is for the writing component and based on the two papers.  Another grade (A,B,C,D,E,F,X) is for the economics component and based on the exams.  Statistically, about 15% would get A's, about 25% would get B's, 40% would get C's, 20% would get D's or below.
Final exam exemption Students who score more than 95% in each of the two midterms and also have perfect attendance record will be awarded an A for the course without having to take the final exam.
For the Fall 98 class syllabus, click here (requiring Acrobat Reader 3.0 to read)

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EC 202 
Principles of Microeconomics
Who? When? Dr. Tran Huu Dung - Winter 2002
PLEASE NOTE THAT THE INFORMATION BELOW APPLIES ONLY TO Dr. DUNG'S SECTIONS, OTHER INSTRUCTORS HAVE DIFFERENT CLASS RULES
Course description 
The main objective of the course is to analyze the decisions of different economic units in a market economy.  Topics covered include the theory of household behavior, input and output decisions of the firm under different market structures.  The course also examines the basis for international trade and the role of government policy in a market economy. 
Who should take the course? Business majors and other interested students (if in doubt, consult your academic advisor)
What are the prerequisites? EC 201
How many exams? Two midterms (30% each) and one final exam (40%).  Each is a mixture of True/False and Multiple Choice questions
Papers? Homework? None
Textbook Required: ECONOMICS by David Colander, 4th ed., McGraw-Hill Irwin
Recommended: Study Guide to accompany Colander's ECONOMICS
What about class attendance? Students must sign attendance sheet for every session.  Attendance records will be taken into consideration when exam scores fall in borderline cases.
Grades Curved.  Historically, about 15% would get A's, about 25% would get B's, 40% would get C's, 20% would get D's or below.
Final exam exemption Students who score more than 95% in each of the two midterms and also have perfect attendance record will be awarded an A for the course without having to take the final exam.
EC 203
Principles of Macroeconomics
(for Dr. Dung's sections only)
Course description  National output and income determination.  Unemployment and inflation.  Government taxation and expenditures.  Fiscal policy.  The role of money.  The Federal Reserve System and monetary policy.  Macroeconomic policy in an open economy.
Who should take the course? Business majors and other interested students (if in doubt, consult your academic advisor)
What are the prerequisites? EC 201
How many exams? Two midterms (30% each) and one final exam (40%).  Each is a mixture of True/False and Multiple Choice questions
Papers? Homework? None
Textbook Required: ECONOMICS by David Colander, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill Irwin
Recommended: Study Guide to accompany Colander's ECONOMICS
What about class attendance? Students must sign attendance sheet for every session.  Attendance records will be taken into consideration when exam scores fall in borderline cases.
Grades Curved.  Historically, about 15% would get A's, about 25% would get B's, 40% would get C's, 20% would get D's or below.
Final exam exemption Students who score more than 95% in each of the two midterms and also have perfect attendance record will be awarded an A for the course without having to take the final exam.

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EC 441
International Trade and the Economy
Course description  This course provides students with an understanding of the contemporary theories and practices of international trade, and the impacts of international trade on national economies.  Topics covered include the theory of comparative advantage, tariffs and nontariff trade barriers, the pros and cons of free trade, and the theory of commercial policy.  Special attention is paid to U.S. trade policy, multinational corporation, and economic integration.
Who should take the course? Undergraduate students
What are the prerequisites? Survey or principles of economics
Is there lot of math? No.  Just basic algebra.
How many exams? Two midterms (25% of total grade each) and one final (40% of total grade)
Papers? Homework? No papers.  Occasional homeworks (10% of total grade)
Textbook International Economics (Fifth edition) By Steven Husted and Michael Melvin
What about class attendance? Extremely important. Students missing more than a total of 3 weekly class sessions will receive a course grade one letter below the grade suggested by their exams and homeworks..
Grades Curved.

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EC 442
International Monetary Theory and Problems
Course description  Four main topics are covered in this course: (1) balance of payments, (2) foreign exchange markets and theories of foreign exchange rate determination, (3) the macroeconomics of an open economy, and (4) the international monetary system and problems.
Who should take the course? Undergraduate students
What are the prerequisites? Survey or principles of economics
Is there lot of math? No.  Just basic algebra.
How many exams? Two midterms (25% of total grade each) and one final (40% of total grade)
Papers? Homework? No papers.  Occasional homeworks (10% of total grade)
Textbook International Economic (Fifth edition) by Husted and Melvin
What about class attendance? Extremely important. Students missing more than a total of 3 weekly class sessions will receive a course grade one letter below the grade suggested by their exams and homeworks.
Grades Curved.

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EC 641
International Trade and the Economy
Course description  This course provides students with an understanding of the contemporary theories and practices of international trade, and the impacts of international trade on national economies.  Topics covered include the theory of comparative advantage, tariffs and nontariff trade barriers, the pros and cons of free trade, and the theory of commercial policy.  Special attention is paid to U.S. trade policy and economic integration.
Who should take the course? Graduate students
What are the prerequisites? Survey or principles of economics
Is there lot of math? No.  Just basic algebra.
How many exams? Two midterms (25% of total grade each) and one final (40% of total grade)
Papers? Homework? No papers.  Occasional homeworks (10% of total grade)
Textbook International Economic (Fifth edition) by Husted and Melvin
What about class attendance? Extremely important. Students missing more than a total of 3 weekly sessions will receive a course grade one letter below the grade suggested by their exams and homeworks.
Grades Curved.

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EC 642
International Monetary Theory and Problems
Course description  Four main topics are covered in this course: (1) balance of payments, (2) foreign exchange markets and theories of foreign exchange rate determination, (3) the macroeconomics of an open economy, and (4) the international monetary system and problems.
Who should take the course? Graduate students
What are the prerequisites? Survey or principles of economics
Is there lot of math? No.  Just basic algebra.
How many exams? Two midterms (25% of total grade each) and one final (40% of total grade)
Papers? Homework? No paper.  Occasional homeworks (10% of total grade)
Textbook International Economic (Fifth edition) by Husted and Melvin
What about class attendance? Extremely important.  Students missing more than a total of 3 weekly sessions will receive a course grade one letter below the grade suggested by their exams and homeworks.
Grades Curved.

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EC 722
Economics for Managers
(for Dr. Dung's sections only)
Course description  This course is designed to show the way modern economics can be used to manage a business enterprise.   It discusses the demand for the firmís products, how to organize production within the firm, the effects on costs, and the firmís inputs as well as output decisions.  The course pays special attention to sophisticated strategies both towards customers and  towards rival firms, and organizational structures.  Other topics include vertical relationships, personnel economics, and the impacts of national and international economic conditions on the firm.
Who should take the course? This is a required course for MBA students at Wright State University
What are the prerequisites? Students must have had some college-level survey (or principles) of economics (for instance EC 523 and EC 524 offered at Wright State University) .
Is there lot of math? Basic college algebra (solving systems of simultaneous equations) is also a must.  Prior exposure to elementary calculus is desirable but not necessary.
How many exams? One mid-term (50%) and one final (50%)
Papers? Homework? None anticipated
Textbooks Required: "Economics for Managers" by Tran Huu Dung, on sale at the WSU Bookstore. Use only the current edition.
What about class attendance? DO NOT ENROLL IN THIS SECTION IF YOU EXPECT TO MISS THREE OR MORE CLASS SESSIONS
Grades Statistically, about 30% would get A's, about 60% would get B's, 10% would get C's or below. No student will get an A, regardless of score, if he/she misses three or more class sessions.
Course Page (for enrolled students only) |

For further information, please contact:

    Dr. Tran H. Dung
    Department of Economics
    Wright State University
    Dayton, OH 45435

    Phone: (937) 775-2295
    Fax: (937) 775-2441
    E-mail: tran.dung@wright.edu

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Last updated: November 6, 2001