openstax Physics is a complete algebra based physics textbook of professional (commercial) quality.

Physics Equations is a supplement that allows this book to be used in a calculus-based course.

 

Other online resources:

      A collection of free and open source materials is hosted at http://physnet.org/. Especially useful is their collection of pdf modules at http://physnet.org/modules/pdf_modules.html

       http://farside.ph.utexas.edu/teaching.html Portions that I have read are well written and informative. Issues about copyright status.

       http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/~mf1i/home.html Based on what I have read, the plusses are: Organized and very clear lectures. The minuses: Too much historical content for students (but profs love this stuff!). The lecture/presentations tend to have different (but effective) styles.

       An earlier version of Physics Equations for the first semester is still available as a Latex created pdf file in portrait or landscape format.

 

First year calculus-based physics:

       http://www.anselm.edu/internet/physics/cbphysics/index.html A first-year calculus based text book with a generous (CC BY-SA 2.5) license, which renders it great for doing almost anything except copying and pasting into Wikiversity (due to attribution requirements.)

o   http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html Excellent reference that undergraduate physics majors will find helpful. Not a textbook.

Algebra-based (or trig-based) college physics:

       http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html. (Algebra/trig based)Very short, but a great book if you give them supplementary problems and rely on lectures to fill in the gaps. Given these limitations, this book is excellent.

       http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/ (Conceptual, designed for high school). An excellent collection, for its level. It must be popular because search engines seem to know all about physicsclassroom.com.

Astronomy resources have been moved to Wikiversity.

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