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Amir A. Farajian
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering,
Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435

Phone: (937) 775-2619
Fax: (937) 775-5082
E-mail:

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Research fields and interests:

Nanoscience and nanotechnology with emphasis on computational modeling, sensors, materials for
energy applications, inelastic response, nano- and molecular-electronics, nanoelectromechanical systems,
electronic and thermal quantum transports. Some of the recent topics include:

        Ab initio characterization and design of materials

        Coherent and noncoherent quantum electronic and thermal transports

        Nanoelectronic-based electrochemical and electromechanical sensors

        Multi-scale modeling of nanomaterials production and corresponding thermodynamics

        Nanostructured fluids: Phase transition and electrorheology

        Nanostructured composites: Inelastic mechanical properties and energy applications


 


- Graphene nanoplatelets exfoliation

Given the current status of graphene, a unique 2D material, and its applications,
exploring methods of graphene mass-production is of paramount importance.
Direct exfoliation of graphene from graphite, without the unwanted effects
of oxidation and/or intercalation, provides large amounts of defect-free
graphene nanoplatelets. Suitable surfactant choice is crucial for this purpose.

Understanding the exfoliation process at the atomic/molecular scale is essential

for production optimization.

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J. Phys. Chem. C. 114, 21083 (2010)

- Coherent and noncoherent transport in quasi-one-dimensional systems
(nanotubes, nanowires, ...)

As shrinking size of electronic components causes them to have nanometer length scales,
transport properties (both electronic and thermal) are governed by the quantum mechanics.
This results in new opportunities and challenges in designing nano and molecular
electronic devices. Of special interest are the finite temperature effects and
electron-phonon interactions.

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Nano Research 7, 945 (2014)
RSC Adv. 4, 2346 (2014)
J. Phys. Chem. C. 117, 12815 (2013)
J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 23, 075301 (2011)
Nanotechnology 20, 015201 (2009)
J. Chem. Phys. 127, 024901 (2007)

Thin Solid Films 499, 269 (2006)

Nanotube Electronics; Physical Review Focus, June 22, 1999

- Electronic structure and molecular dynamics of hydrogen-containing nanocages

Hydrogen-containing nanocages provide novel solutions to the hydrogen storage
problem, which is essential in using hydrogen as a renewable and clean source of
energy. Simulating the properties of such systems requires accurate electronic structure
and molecular dynamics methods.

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Nano Lett. 8, 767 (2008)
Cover feature of Nano Letters, March 2008 issue, March 12, 2008
Featured in Nanowerk Nanotechnology Portal, Oct. 19, 2007
Featured in EurekAlert, March 20, 2008

- Phase transition and electrorheology in nanotube suspensions

Nanostructured fluids possess novel characteristics and immense potentials.
Controlling phase transition in nanostructured fluids is a key to their application.
Phase transition in nanotube suspensions, e.g., can be controlled by applying
electric field. A wide range of applications can be considered, for example
superior dampers, heat and charge transfer , as well as cancer therapy.

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Phys. Rev. B 77, 205432 (2008)

- Nanosensors

When the unique electronic and transport properties of nanoscale systems are combined
with their affinity for various molecules, nanosensor functionality will be the natural
result. Changes in electronic transport properties of nanotubes as a result of gas molecules
adsorption, e.g., are shown to provide superior sensor potentials.

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Nano Research 7, 945 (2014)
RSC Adv. 4, 2346 (2014)
J. Phys. Chem. C. 117, 12815 (2013)
J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25, 115303 (2013)
Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 022103 (2008)

- Nanoelectromechanical systems

Mechanical properties of nanometer scale systems exhibit unique features which can
be exploited for novel applications. Seamless and reversible bending of systems such as
nanotubes can be used together with their transport properties in order to design
nanoelectromechanical sensors and switches.

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J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25, 115303 (2013)
Physica E 22, 675 (2004)
Phys. Rev. B 67, 205423 (2003)

- Nanostructured composites

Incorporating nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanoribbons, etc. within material matrices
can enhance their mechanical, transport and optical properties significantly. Same kinds
of significant changes occur in nanoscale systems when they are doped with individual
atoms and ions or with atomic clusters. Novel nanosheets can have unique electronic
and mechanical properties.

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J. Phys. Chem. C. 116, 22916 (2012)
Chem. Phys. Lett. 511, 101 (2011)

Phys. Rev. B 78, 155427 (2008)
Phys. Rev. B 68, 075410 (2003)
J. Chem. Phys. 111, 2164 (1999)
Featured in the front page of Japanese newspaper Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun (Business and Technology), Nov. 21, 2001

- Activated processes

Some of the most important processes which occur in nature or in labs are activated;
i.e., they do not proceed without an activating force, as the reactants and products
are separated by an energy barrier. Simulating such physical and chemical processes
requires especial considerations, to effectively map their minute/hour time scales to
the femtosecond/picosecond domain of accurate molecular dynamics studies.

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J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6401 (2001)



Publication list (PDF)

 



Career history:


2012-present: Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering,
Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio

 

2007-2012: Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering,
Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio

2005-2007: Postdoctoral Research Associate/Research Scientist
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science,
Rice University, Houston, Texas

2001-2005: Research Associate
Institute for Materials Research,
Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

1999-2001: Postdoctoral Researcher
National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research,
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan

Education:

1999: Ph.D. in Materials Science

Institute for Materials Research,
Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

1994: M.Sc. in Solid State Physics
Department of Physics,
Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran

1991: B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering
Department of Electrical Engineering,
Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran