About

Announcements

Notification for Students Experiencing Issues with Waitlisted Courses

Jul 20, 2018

We are experiencing intermittent issues with waitlisted courses. If you receive a notification that a seat is available to you, and the option to add the course is not available, please email our registrar at wsu-registrar@wright.edu.

We apologize for the inconvenience and hope to resolve the issue quickly.

 


Fall Billing Statements Available August 1st

Jul 17, 2018

Fall 2018 billing statements will be available on August 1st, 2018.  Fees are due August 15th.  Courses will be cancelled for nonpayment if the tuition is not paid, enrolled in the payment plan, or covered by financial aid on August 15th.  For more information on fee due dates, visit: http://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/due-dates

Students and authorized users may pay or enroll in the payment plan online after August 1st. Students will log into WINGS Express, and access the Student Fees menu under the Student and Financial aid tab.  Authorized users can follow this link: http://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/access-your-account.  Students may set up authorized users under the Student Fees menu. 

To enroll in the payment plan, a down payment of 5% of the balance, plus a $25 payment plan fee must be paid.  The remaining balance is then divided over the September, October, and November.  For more information about payment options, including the payment plan, visit: http://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/payment-options.

Students who are using financial aid should make sure that they do not have any outstanding requirements.  Log into WINGS Express>Student and Financial Aid>Financial Aid and Scholarships> Eligibility Requirements.  Choose the aid year that begins with Summer 2018.  Any financial aid requirements, or an unsatisfactory status for the Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will prevent financial aid from paying.  

Financial aid for students who are meeting all requirements should show as a credit on the August 1st statement, and will disburse on the first day of Fall semester (Monday, August 28th).  Excess financial aid (up to $750) may be moved onto the Wright 1 Card after August 1st, for use at the campus book store.  The financial aid refund process will begin during the first week of classes, with refunds being received by students through the second week of classes.

For information about changes to financial aid, registration, and billing for the 2018-2019 school year, visit: http://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/article/students-please-read-the-following-policy-changes-affecting-registration-financial-aid-and-billing

Contact Raider Connect with any questions.

Walk-ins: Student Service Wing at the front of the Student Union

                 Monday-Thursday: 8:30am - 5pm

                 Friday: 9:30am - 5pm

            

Phone: (937) 775-4000

Fax: (937) 775-4410

E-mail: raiderconnect@wright.edu


Financial Aid Disbursement for Fall Will Begin on August 27th

Jul 10, 2018

Disbursement will now take place on the first day of the term (Fall semester begins August 27th, 2018). Disbursement is the process of your awarded financial aid being applied to your student account.

To verify that your financial aid will not be delayed, log into WINGS Express>Student and Financial Aid>Financial Aid and Scholarships>Eligibility Requirements.  All unsatisfied requirements must be satisfied, and academic progress status must be satisfactory for aid to pay.

Financial aid refunds are different from disbursement. Refunds are any excess financial aid that is distributed to the student upon the satisfactory completion of all requirements. Students will begin receiving refunds near the end of the first week of classes. Direct deposit may be set up in WINGS Express under the Student Fees menu.

Contact Raider Connect with any questions at 937-775-4000, email raiderconnect@wright.edu, or visit Raider Connect in the Student Union. 

Please visit our website to view all of the registration, billing, and financial aid policy changes: https://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/revised-refunds-and-registration-process 

 


Continuing Students Must Register by August 15th to Avoid $250 Late Fee

Jul 9, 2018

Late registration fees for continuing students will be assessed beginning the first business day after the first fee payment due date for fall and spring terms.  For Fall semester, fees are due August 15th.  Continuing students who register for Fall classes on or after August 16th will incur a $250 late registration fee.

For more information about changes to registration, billing, and financial aid, visit: http://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/article/students-please-read-the-following-policy-changes-affecting-registration-financial-aid-and-billing

 


Introducing the Division of Student Success

Apr 26, 2018

We are excited to share the news that with the broadened scope and addition of campus-wide services, University College has been renamed the Division of Student Success effective May 2018. This name change reflects our primary purpose as a service unit, providing support to the degree-granting colleges and the university as a whole.

University College, previously University Division, was created in 1998 to serve as a central service for academic support, first-year programs, and academic advising for intending majors.  Although the goal of University College has always been to serve the students, faculty, and staff of the entire university, early in its inception the focus was on new, direct from high-school, first-year students and intending majors.  Over time, services of the Academic Success Centers were not only serving new first-time students, but a growing number of transfer students and serving courses at the sophomore, junior, and senior levels. The move to the new Student Success Center, not only allowed these centers to serve more students, it also provided for additional programs in study coaching, expanded Supplemental Instruction, and significant curricular changes in developmental math (with the creation of the Math Studio) and developmental writing through co-requisite models that have increased student success.

The Division of Student Success remains in the Office of the Provost and supports the academic mission of the university through Academic Support & Foundation Studies, University Academic Advising, and the Student Success Planning Office. Through these units, the Division of Student Success will help establish an ecosystem of programs and services, working with students, faculty and staff, that focuses on educational planning, career development, course completion, persistence, retention, and degree attainment.

Undecided/exploratory and College Credit Plus students will continue to receive academic advising in the Division of Student Success. As a practical matter, within Banner and RAPS, their college designation will remain University College.

With the help of the Marketing web team, a new website has been launched at wright.edu/student-success.  Access from wright.edu/university-college will redirect to the newly designed site.  We've also worked with colleges and departments across campus to refine online references to University College. In the days and weeks to come, you will continue to see updates reflecting these exciting changes.

We appreciate the continued support of the campus community.

 


Students: Please Read the Following Policy Changes Affecting Registration, Financial Aid, and Billing

Apr 19, 2018

Refund, Financial Aid, Registration, Late Fee, and Payment Plan Updates for 2018-2019

To improve student access to open seats in courses and better align the university with federal regulations and best practices, the university has approved process and policy changes to several areas, beginning Summer 2018:

1. Academic Refunds: 

To obtain a 100 percent tuition refund, students will need to officially withdraw from a course by the Friday of the second week of classes during a full-term class, or by the first Friday of classes for A or B-term classes.

Students should contact their instructor or RaiderConnect for 100 percent refund dates and times of courses that are not considered to be A, B, or full-term courses. In general, the 100 percent refund date or time ends when 15 percent of the scheduled course time has been completed.

The withdrawal dates can be found on the Academic Calendar: https://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/academic-calendar/summer-semester-2018

2. Financial aid disbursement and refunds

Disbursement will now take place on the first day of the term. Disbursement is the process of your awarded financial aid being applied to your student account.

Financial aid refunds are different from disbursement. Refunds are any excess financial aid that is distributed to the student upon the satisfactory completion of all requirements. Students will begin receiving refunds near the end of the first week of classes.

3. Registration cancellation for incomplete payment of fees

Student accounts must be paid in full, enrolled in a payment plan, or have sufficient financial aid to pay the balance by the payment due date to avoid cancellation of classes.

Students applying for financial aid are responsible for checking to ensure all requirements have been met in order to receive financial aid. If there is a shortfall between your tuition and fees and your financial aid award, you must pay the balance in full or enroll in the payment plan by the fee payment due date. If payment is incomplete, student course registrations will be canceled on the third business day after the first due date for each term.

Students receiving third-party assistance must submit the authorization form from your sponsor by the fee payment due date and pay any unpaid charges in full or enroll in a payment plan. If payment is incomplete, student course registrations will be canceled on the third business day after the first due date for each term.

4. Late registration fees

Late registration fees for continuing students will be assessed beginning the first business day after the first fee payment due date for fall and spring terms. For summer term, late registration fees will not be applied until the first day of summer classes.

There are two categories for late registration fees. Only one fee will be applied to a late course registration, which is dependent upon the registration timing:

  • A flat fee of $250 per student will apply for registrations that take place between the first payment due date and the course census date.
  • A fee of $100 per credit hour will be assessed for course registrations that take place after the course census date.

5. Installment payment plan

Students can easily enroll in a four-payment installment plan to pay their tuition and fees using WINGS Express. The plan’s first payment consists of a $25 processing fee and 5 percent down payment toward the account balance. The remaining three payments have defined due dates and will each be equal to one-third of the outstanding account balance. A $50 late-payment fee will be assessed for each late installment payment.

For more information, visit https://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/revised-refunds-and-registration-process or contact Raider Connect.

 


Summer 2018 Financial Aid Refunds

Apr 5, 2018

Summer refunds will begin to be processed by the end of the first week of classes.  In order for a financial aid refund to be processed, your financial aid must have disbursed to your account, and you must have all financial aid requirements satisfied. 

To check for unsatisfied requirements, log into WINGS Express> Student and Financial Aid> Financial Aid and Scholarships> Eligibility Requirements. 

You must also be in good academic standing for financial aid to disburse.  For information on the Satisfactory Academic Progress policy and appeal process, please visit: http://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/financial-aid/satisfactory-academic-progress.

For students expecting a financial aid refund, excess funds can be moved onto the Wright 1 Card and used as payment at the campus bookstore.  The campus bookstore offers rental and price matching options.  To move excess financial aid onto the Wright 1 card, log into WINGS Express> Student and Financial Aid> Wright 1 Card and Meal Plan Services> Wright1 FA Flex Deposit Using Financial Aid.  If eligibile, up to $750 of the expected refund can be moved onto the card. 

Contact Raider Connect with any questions.  

 

 


Summer Fees due April 15th

Apr 3, 2018

Summer fees can now be viewed and paid online in WINGS Express. To avoid course cancellation, fees must be paid by April 15th. There is a payment plan option available in WINGS Express. The payment plan requires a down payment of 5% of the balance, plus a $25 one-time payment plan fee.  Students who are waiting on financial aid due to verification or academic progress are highly encouraged to enroll in the payment plan to avoid course cancellation. 

To view and pay your bill, log into WINGS Express > Student and Financial Aid > Student Fees> Student Account Options> Make a Payment.  

To enroll in the payment plan, WINGS Express > Student and Financial Aid> Student Fees> Student Account Options> Enroll in Payment Plan.

Contact Raider Connect with any questions regarding billing, registration, or financial aid.


Refund, Financial Aid, Registration, Late Fee, and Payment Plan Updates for 2018-2019

Mar 22, 2018

To improve student access to open seats in courses and better align the university with federal regulations and best practices, the university has approved process and policy changes to several areas, beginning Summer 2018:

1. Academic Refunds: 

To obtain a 100 percent tuition refund, students will need to officially withdraw from a course by the Friday of the second week of classes during a full-term class, or by the first Friday of classes for A or B-term classes.

Students should contact their instructor or RaiderConnect for 100 percent refund dates and times of courses that are not considered to be A, B, or full-term courses. In general, the 100 percent refund date or time ends when 15 percent of the scheduled course time has been completed.

The withdrawal dates can be found on the Academic Calendar: https://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/academic-calendar/summer-semester-2018

2. Financial aid disbursement and refunds

Disbursement will now take place on the first day of the term. Disbursement is the process of your awarded financial aid being applied to your student account.

Financial aid refunds are different from disbursement. Refunds are any excess financial aid that is distributed to the student upon the satisfactory completion of all requirements. Students will begin receiving refunds near the end of the first week of classes.

3. Registration cancellation for incomplete payment of fees

Student accounts must be paid in full, enrolled in a payment plan, or have sufficient financial aid to pay the balance by the payment due date to avoid cancellation of classes.

Students applying for financial aid are responsible for checking to ensure all requirements have been met in order to receive financial aid. If there is a shortfall between your tuition and fees and your financial aid award, you must pay the balance in full or enroll in the payment plan by the fee payment due date. If payment is incomplete, student course registrations will be canceled on the third business day after the first due date for each term.

Students receiving third-party assistance must submit the authorization form from your sponsor by the fee payment due date and pay any unpaid charges in full or enroll in a payment plan. If payment is incomplete, student course registrations will be canceled on the third business day after the first due date for each term.

4. Late registration fees

Late registration fees for continuing students will be assessed beginning the first business day after the first fee payment due date for fall and spring terms. For summer term, late registration fees will not be applied until the first day of summer classes.

There are two categories for late registration fees. Only one fee will be applied to a late course registration, which is dependent upon the registration timing:

  • A flat fee of $250 per student will apply for registrations that take place between the first payment due date and the course census date.
  • A fee of $100 per credit hour will be assessed for course registrations that take place after the course census date.

5. Installment payment plan

Students can easily enroll in a four-payment installment plan to pay their tuition and fees using WINGS Express. The plan’s first payment consists of a $25 processing fee and 5 percent down payment toward the account balance. The remaining three payments have defined due dates and will each be equal to one-third of the outstanding account balance. A $50 late-payment fee will be assessed for each late installment payment.

For more information, visit https://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/revised-refunds-and-registration-process or contact Raider Connect.


Wright Guarantee Tuition Program starting Fall 2018

Mar 22, 2018

The Wright Guarantee Tuition Program guarantees the same annual cost of tuition, housing, and dining over a four-year college career for new incoming, in-state, degree-seeking undergraduate students.

Approved by the Wright State Board of Trustees on Dec. 15 and the Ohio Department of Higher Education on Feb. 5, the Wright Guarantee Tuition Program will be implemented for Fall Semester 2018. Students who enroll in the summer will be placed in the fall cohort, giving them an extra semester of the guarantee.

Under the program, students will pay the exact same rate for tuition, housing, and dining for 12 consecutive semesters. If students fail to graduate within 12 semesters, they will pay the rate charged to the next cohort.

The Wright Tuition Guarantee Program is available at both Dayton and Lake Campus. The program is for newly admitted undergraduate, degree-seeking students who are Ohio residents. The program is not applicable to graduate, professional, international, and currently enrolled undergraduate students. 

Currently enrolled undergraduate students will continue to pay the current tuition rate until such time that the Ohio Legislature approves a tuition rate increase.

Wright State joins other Ohio public universities with similar tuition guarantee programs, including The Ohio State University, Miami University, Ohio University, Kent State University, University of Toledo, Bowling Green State University and Youngstown State University. Wright State will remain one of the most affordable universities in Ohio.

For more information on the Wright Guarantee Program, visit: https://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/the-wright-guarantee-tuition-program

For tuition information, visti: https://www.wright.edu/raiderconnect/accounts-and-bills/tuition-and-fees


Last Date to Drop With a “W” Grade for C term Spring Courses

Mar 9, 2018

The Last Day to drop full term Spring 2018 courses with a W grade is Sunday, March 18th 2018. Students who are required to drop courses in persons because of special circumstances or registration holds must do so by 5:00 PM on March 16th, 2018 at Raider Connect.


Fall Registration

Mar 9, 2018

Registration for the Fall semester will begin on March 22, 2018. Check your registration status in WINGS Express > Student and Financial Aid > Registration & Records > Registration Status.

For deadlines to add and drop classes, please refer to the academic calendar


Summer Registration

Feb 12, 2018

Registration for the Summer semester has begun! Check your registration status in WINGS Express > Student and Financial Aid > Registration & Records > Registration Status.

For deadlines to add and drop classes, please refer to the academic calendar on our website. 

Summer fee bills will be available April 1st, and will be due April 15th.


Spring 2018 Class Schedule Now Online

Oct 24, 2017

The Spring 2018 class schedule is now available online.  Registration will begin November 2nd, 2017.  Log in to WINGS Express to check your registration status for information that affects your registration, such as the date you may register and holds which prevent registration.


Take Our Survey

Feb 7, 2017

Let us know how we are doing! 


Certified to Better Serve You

Jan 13, 2017

In University College, we actively pursue opportunities to serve our students better.  Currently our professional and student staff are completing training in the areas of Appreciative Advising, Customer Service through Raider Gold, College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) Tutor Training, and Safe Space Ally Development.  

Learn more about each program using the menu below.

Appreciative Advising

Appreciative Advising logo

One of the key strategies for improving student success and retention is for academic advisors to actively engage students in the learning process by creating an environment that positively encourages students to take ownership of their academic career by acknowledging and utilizing their strengths and skills and by creating action steps to achieve their long term academic goals. We assert that a successful implementation of any academic advising strategy must include trust and rapport with students as the centerpiece. We believe that learning and implementing Appreciative Advising in the Academic Advising unit will provide the necessary framework for continuous improvement in the service provided to students and to overall student success.

“Appreciative Advising is a constructivist way of thinking that provides a theoretical infrastructure and practical framework for advisors to optimize their interaction with students and colleagues in individual and group settings.” (Bloom, Hutson & HE, 2008) Appreciative Advising’s six phase model provides a fluid nonlinear scaffold for advisors to “intentionally use positive, active, and attentive listening and questioning strategies to build trust and rapport with students (disarm); uncover students’ strengths and skills (discover); encourage and be inspired by students’ dreams (design); co-construct action plans with students to make their goals a reality (design); support students as they carry out their plans (deliver); and challenge both themselves and the students to do and become even better (don’t settle).” (Appreciative Advising Whitepaper, 2008).

Academic Advisors completed the Appreciative Advising online course via Florida Atlantic University during the fall semester. Advisors will utilize the six phase Appreciative Advising model as part of an overall proactive advising strategy that uses a student centered approach as the foundation to aid in retention & graduation efforts for University College and Wright State University. The hiring of several new advisors has permitted the application of proactive Appreciative Advising techniques within University College.

Having completed the Appreciative Advising online course, advisors will apply for a certification in Appreciative Advising. “Certified Appreciative Advisors demonstrate both a conceptual understanding of the Appreciative Advising framework and have demonstrated specific Appreciative Advising skills and techniques. Certified Appreciative Advisors are committed to a standard of excellence in the field of advising and optimizing their students’ educational experiences.” (Appreciative Advising Certification, Florida Atlantic University, 2016)

Raider Gold Customer Service Training

Raider Gold logoPeople remember great customer service.  It lets them know they are valued, builds trust, reduces problems, and defines the experience of Wright State.  Great customer service means maintaining high standards and training all representatives to realize the importance of their roles.  

Student employees are often at the front line of customer interaction.  With the launch of a new program called Raider Gold, University College is committed to ensuring our student staff provide gold standard service to all customers. 

In 2016, staff members Dawn Arnold and Sonia Hackathorne attended the Academic Impressions Customer Service Skill Training Conference to receive certification in Higher Education Customer Service.  Modeled after service excellence programs at Coastal Carolina University, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Queens University of Charlotte, Raider Gold explores topics of professionalism, diversity, and the value of customer service to our organization.  Incorporating additional information from the tutoring certification program CRLA (College Reading & Learning Association), the new training program also focuses on communication skills, active listening, referral services, and defines academic success support responsibilities. 

Raider Gold requires 8 hours of student training leading to customer service representative certification designed to streamline customer service, raise awareness of expectations, and create consistency in service across all units. 

Ultimately, the goal is to expand Raider Gold as a training opportunity for campus organizations interested in certifying student staff in customer service representation.

CRLA Tutor Certification

College Reading and Learning Association logoThe College Reading and Learning Association's (CRLA) International Tutoring Training Program Certification provides recognition and positive reinforcement for tutors' successful work from an international organization. The process sets an internationally accepted standard of skills and training for tutors. 
 
For a program to qualify for CRLA Certification, it must meet stringent tutor selection and evaluation criteria. Training must define and assess outcomes. Peer Leaders must successfully complete at least 10 hours of training and 25 hours of actual tutoring to be eligible for certification. 
 
Topics covered in the training certification process include:
  • Definition of tutoring and tutor responsibilities
  • Basic tutoring guidelines (do's and don'ts)
  • Techniques for successfully beginning and ending a tutor session
  • Adult learners, learning theory, and/or learning styles
  • Assertiveness and/or handling difficult students
  • Role modeling
  • Setting goals and/or planning
  • Communication skills
  • Active listening and paraphrasing
  • Referral skills
  • Study skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Compliance with the ethics and philosophy of the tutor program, sexual harassment, and/or plagiarism
  • Modeling problem solving

Safe Space Ally Development Network

Safe Space logoThe Safe Space Ally Development Network at Wright State University dares to transform the campus environment for LGBTQA+ students, staff and faculty. Through the Safe Space Ally Development Network, individuals and offices are identified that provide a network of support for the emotional, psychological, social and physical well-being of our LGBTQA+ community.

Through its bold skills-based training that focuses on Social Justice Allyship & active bystander intervention skills, individuals and offices are identified that can provide a network of support for the emotional, psychological, social and physical well-being of our LGBTQA+ community.

During Fall semester 2016, staff participated in the Safe Space Ally Development workshop facilitated by the Office of LGBTQA Affairs. After participating in the workshop, staff were given the opportunity to submit an Ally Action Plan.

 

 


Winners of Fall 2015 WSU First-Year Seminar Awards

Jun 2, 2016

The First-Year Seminar Awards on March 10, 2016, recognized eleven special award recipients honored for their work in fall 2015 First-Year Seminars (FYS) at Wright State University.  Photos of “Fysie” recipients can be viewed on wrightstate.smugmug.com.  Peer mentor Hunter Cregger participated in a spring internship with a CPA firm and was held captive by tax season until after April 15. As shown below, First-Year Seminar Award recipients are:

Standing:

Betsie Turner, Peer Mentor, Doug Saul Award for Excellence in First-Year Seminar Instruction with Kim Stephens
Kim Stephens, Staff, Doug Saul Award for Excellence in First-Year Seminar Instruction with Monica Ratliff and Betsy Turner
Monica Ratliff, Peer Mentor, Doug Saul Award for Excellence in First-Year Seminar Instruction with Kim Stephens
Dan Dakin, Staff, Outstanding Collaboration with Wiz Sugiarto
Dr. Nicole Carter, Faculty, Outstanding Faculty Commitment to First-Year Seminars
Nicole Loy, Staff, Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities

FYSIES.png

Seated:

Amanda Spencer, Staff, Outstanding Classroom Innovation with Hunter Cregger
Harolynn Williams, Staff, Outstanding Classroom Innovation
Dr. Christa Agiro, Faculty, Outstanding Faculty Commitment to First-Year Seminars
Wiz Sugiarto, Staff, Outstanding Collaboration with Dan Dakin

Inset:

Catherine Queener, Director of First-Year Programs, presenting certificate to Hunter Cregger
Hunter Cregger, Peer Mentor, Outstanding Classroom Innovation with Amanda Spencer
Amanda Spencer, Staff, Outstanding Classroom Innovation with Hunter Cregger

Celebration of 16 Years of WSU First-Year Seminars  

Wright State University observed an historic moment for the first-year seminar awards program at Wright State University this spring, as presenters transformed the 16th annual “Elsies,” short for Learning Communities Awards, to the 1st annual “Fysies,” short for First-Year Seminar Awards.

About recipients and award categories:

Doug Saul Award for Excellence in Learning Community Instruction

A staff / peer mentor team were the 2015 recipients of the Doug Saul Award for Excellence in Learning Community Instruction.  Kim Stephens taught an exploring UVC 1010 for students undecided about major, with assistance from peer mentors Monica Ratliff and Betsie Turner. This instructional team’s extensive efforts helping students learn about majors of interest plus career options and take part in several Raider traditions like attending athletic, diversity, and common text events resulted in the very highest student evaluation results. 

• This category recognizes FYS instructors who excel in several areas and who serve as models of very effective instruction. Very effective FYS instruction includes:
o Strong integration of FYS goals into the class,
o Noteworthy service to FYS students,
o Strong academic focus, content, and challenge,
o Strong ratings on student evaluations,
o Achievements of note in other categories, such as innovation in teaching, co-curricular activities, and collaboration
o Strong connections between the seminar and a linked core course, when linked
o Fostering a strong sense of community among FYS students

The awards were presented to Stephens, Ratliff and Turner by Tutoring Center Director Jennifer Lobo, who began the 2015-16 academic year as Coordinator of First-Year Programs.


Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities

Nicole Loy was the winner of this year’s Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities. By involving a first-year seminar for nursing students in activities such as how to insert a catheter, insert an NG tube, and check pulse rates in various parts of the body using patient simulators, she fully immersed new students in all aspects of their intended major. Dr. Deborah Ulrich presented the award.

• The Holly Jackson Award category includes field trips, class projects that complement linked core courses, service learning, and similar activities.  The category focuses mainly on out-of-class activities and experiences.


Outstanding Classroom Innovation Award

Harolynn Williams raised WSU student awareness of the issues of first generation and under-represented school children by inspiring her first-year seminar class to take on a pen pal project. In three separate exchanges, WSU students introduced themselves, learned about the fifth graders, and gave advice about being successful in school.  College of Science & Mathematics Interim Dean Kathy Engisch presented the award.

Staff instructor Amanda Spencer, assisted by peer mentor Hunter Cregger truly built a community and addressed additional aspects of college with a time budgeting system, a “best v. worst” email communication competition, a sexual health & alcohol safety trivia game, and team-building exercises and yoga instruction through Campus Recreation. Dr. Arijit Sengupta presented the awards to Spencer and Cregger.  
• This category includes innovations which integrate technology into FYS, including use of multimedia, email discussions, etc.  It also includes all other new and/or creative activities and strategies related to enhancing the teaching/learning experience.  The category focuses mainly on in-class experiences and related work.


Outstanding Collaboration Award

Staff instructors Dan Dakin and Wiz Sugiarto formed an Academic Affairs / Student Affairs dream team and provided new students with an exceptional first semester. Collaborative partners included the professor of the students’ linked Finance class, staff from the Raj Soin College of Business, Dunbar Library, and Housing. Residence Life & Housing Director Dan Bertsos presented the award to Dakin and Sugiarto.

• This category include collaboration between different colleges, between Academic and Student Affairs, between the FYS instructor and linked core faculty, between instructors of different FYS, and between the FYS instructor and various organizations, both on and off campus.  The collaboration may involve development or revision of a learning community and /or planning FYS events or projects.


Outstanding Faculty Commitment to First-Year Seminars

Dr. Christa Agiro provides multiple ways for first-year students to understand diversity -- and she helps talented returning students become peer mentors. She speaks in peer mentor trainings, faculty development, and First-Year Student Distinction Award events. College of Education & Human Services Dean Joseph Keferl presented Dr. Agiro’s award.


Dr. Nicole Carter received the Outstanding Faculty Commitment to First-Year Seminars award for teaching the seminar themed Black Students and Leadership. She inspired her class early on, changing student perspectives and relationship to learning with an ethics of care-based class. In course evaluations, students overwhelmingly recommended this instructor to next year’s new students, and about half of them also enrolled in Dr. Carter’s spring term Intro to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies course. Dr. Herb Dregalla presented Dr. Carter’s award.

• This award recognizes faculty teaching a FYS or university course linked to a first-year FYS.  Their significant/active role in the FYS’s experiences exemplifies a commitment to first-year students and FYS goals.   Examples include class visits, joint field trips, and collaborations & consultations regarding course materials or activities.


Please join us in congratulating these dedicated First-Year Seminar instructors and peer mentors!
Catherine Queener, Kim Stephens, & Mindy Louderback
First -Year Programs, University College 


University Writing Center Coach Profiles

Nov 3, 2015

Meet Writing Center Coaches, Gabriela and Chloe!

Exceptional students fuel academic success in University College.  We are fortunate to employ nearly 20% of all student workers on campus as tutors, study coaches, supplemental instruction leaders, SCALE-UP assistants, math tutors, Math Studio proctors, peer mentors, Writing Center coaches, and customer service staff.  Often, we are first introduced to these students when they seek assistance in our academic success centers and yearn to help their peers learn the skills they've acquired through their experience.

Gabriela Acevedo and Chloe Schwartz were inspired to become Writing Center coaches by the experiences they shared when they first came to the Writing Center as students seeking to improve their skills.

Read their stories in their own words.

Gabriela AcevedoIMG_0104-G.jpg

     Becoming a writing coach has been one of the best things that could ever happen to me as a college student. Most people do not give much thought to the fact that writing is such an important part in a student's life. Writing is not only about punctuation and grammar, but about the process that goes along with these two, and the world of possibilities that becomes available to each writer once he or she understands it clearly. My interest in writing began at a very young age, but as I grew up, I realized that there was more to writing than just putting thoughts or creative ideas on a piece of paper.

       When I started attending Wright State University, I took English 1100, a class that most students have to take their first year. My professor, noticing that I was struggling with my writing assignments, advised me to visit the Writing Center. Before my first session, I felt a bit scared and was hesitant to spend time showing my assignment to a stranger, but it turned out to be extremely helpful. First of all, my coach was amazing and I felt very comfortable working with someone who was just like me, a student. Secondly, the time I spent in the session flew by, and I ended up feeling great about how my paper turned out. After that experience, I visited the Writing Center on a weekly basis for my other classes as well. I started to feel confident in my writing, which in return, allowed me to improve significantly and helped my grades get better.

       At the end of the spring semester, one of the coaches told me about how the Writing Center was looking for new writing coaches and, after introducing me to the Program's Director, David Bringhurst, she encouraged me to apply for the job. I never imagined that I would be thought of as a good enough writer to help others, considering the fact that English is not my first language. But here was someone telling me that I actually had a chance to aid students who were going through the same situation I experienced. My work each day motivates me to do the job well because I understand the students' struggles and I can relate to them.

       Working at the Writing Center has turned out to be a major blessing in my life because, not only do I get to work with people that appreciate knowledge and writing, but I get to interact with students every day. I help them understand that writing is not something that necessarily needs to be hard or impossible. Anyone is capable of writing a good essay, research paper, original story, or any other written work that they put their minds into. And what is truly amazing about this all is that, with the right help, this process can be completely enjoyable.

Chloe SchwartzIMG_0101-chloe.jpg

       Before my first semester at Wright State, I experienced the anxiety most freshman do. I had not taken any A.P. courses in high school, and was wracked with feelings of uncertainty as to how and if I was going to make it through a college class.

       English 1100 was no exception. As the instructor talked over the syllabus, a little voice in my mind tried to tell me I was not going to get through this course. In that moment I was concerned that the assignment criteria would be at a level of difficulty I wasn’t ready for, but my underlying fear was that I would give up on the assignments and in doing so, give up on myself. Our first paper was assigned to be a narrative, and I had had experience writing those in high school. My familiarity alleviated my anxiousness enough to begin. The next couple of weeks were spent drafting and revising my story. I was trying to craft every detail to absolute perfection. After four painstakingly-revised drafts, I turned in the final product and breathed a sigh of relief. I was finally finished with this goliath of an assignment.

       That same lecture, the instructor concluded the time frame, “Okay guys, we started out with a lighter and easier paper. Now, time to move on to the hard stuff.” And to that, I actually laughed, certain my instructor was joking. My peers were silent.

       The rest of class was spent explaining this thing called a “text analysis”. I recall that before my instructor explained a text analysis I was fairly certain I had an idea of what this was. After his explanation I realized I had never done any like this in high school. I was, in every practical sense, clueless. I felt like a deer in the headlights.

       After I had completed a first draft, I met with my instructor to receive feedback. Going into the meeting, I was aware that my paper was not what it was supposed to be. My biggest problem, at that moment, was that I was lacking enough understanding of college-level text analysis to the point that I could not articulate concrete questions. This was what led me to seek help from the Writing Center.

       I sat down at one of the dry-erase board tables, and soon after, a writing coach came over and introduced himself. He was a student just like me! At this stage in my college career, it was intimidating for me to ask my professors questions because I was so new to the environment. The ease and informality of having a conversation with a fellow student allowed me to come out of my shell. I asked Josh, the writing coach, so many questions.  Together, we took a more in-depth look at text analysis. Josh talked about it with me until I understood. By that point, I was so excited about the new skills he showed me that we spent another half-hour session writing all over the tables, completely reorganizing my paper. Josh showed me how I could be independent as a writer, which allowed me to perceive myself as a more independent student.  I had no more moments of, “oh my gosh I can’t do this.” When writing every assignment after that, I was confident I had the skills to do so.

       Visiting the Writing Center as a freshman gave me the confidence to apply for a position as a writing coach. I had never before been so excited about an opportunity. I love this job, and my personal mission is to help other students realize potentials they never knew they had- like my writing coach did for me.  


The Independent Scholars Network at Wright State University

Oct 2, 2015

The Independent Scholars Network (ISN) exists to provide resources and services which enhance the academic and social-cultural experiences of a student who emancipates from foster care into higher education.

We have a broad spectrum of students who populate University College.  Students who are Independent Scholars are one unique group that helps to make us who we are as a rich and culturally diverse institution.

Research shows that while a large percentage of foster youth indicate a desire to attend college, a fairly low percentage actually matriculate and even fewer actually earn a college degree.  This is, in part due to the fact that they are often less prepared for college due to the transient nature of their high school experiences.  On average, foster youth move to new placements up to three times per year, and with each new placement, they may change schools and can lose up to six months of educational progress. They also lack the financial, housing and other support services needed to become successful college students. Nationally, emancipated foster youth experience a greater rate of homelessness, unemployment and institutionalization.  In 2010, Wright State decided to become part of the solution by instituting the Independent Scholars Network.  In fact, while several higher education institutions have some initiatives in place, WSU it is the only university in the state of Ohio to have a comprehensive first-year initiative for former foster youth. 

Our Independent Scholars Network is made up of an interdisciplinary team of individuals from across the campus and the community dedicated to providing resources, services and support to enhance the opportunity for academic success for this population of students.   These elements include assistance with study skills, time management, tutoring and life skills coaching; guaranteed housing within the university community (including breaks); dedicated financial aid counseling; and full access to health and mental health services.   Members of the ISN team are from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Residence Life & Housing, Financial Aid, Student Support Services, Disability Services,  Women’s Center, Police Department, faculty, and of course, Academic Advising and First-Year Programs here in University College.  From outside the university community, there are members from various Children’s Services agencies, County Job and Family Services and members of St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church, Beavercreek, Ohio.  Throughout the academic year, the Esther Circle of St. Andrew supply handmade quilts for dorm beds, dorm room supplies, home-cooked meals, snacks and even sewing lessons.     

The 2015-2016 academic year marks the fifth year for this innovative and supportive program.  Over the years, it has been fine-tuned and tweaked as it has grown and developed, producing positive results for our Independent Scholars Network participants.  There are currently 27 ISN students attending our institution with an additional two students expected for spring 2016. 

To learn more about ISN, go to:  www.wright.edu/independent-scholars.

-          Pam Beatty, University College Academic Advisor


University College and Academic Success Centers

May 19, 2015

The offices of Academic Advising, First-Year Programs, Math Studio, and the Academic Success Centers of Tutoring Services, Supplemental Instruction, University Writing Center, and the Math Learning Center are now co-located in the Student Success Center building to better serve all students.  

University College services locations:
  • Academic Advising and Administrative Services - 101 Student Success Center
  • First-Year Programs - 126 Student Success Center
  • Math Studio - 222 Student Success Center
  • Academic Success Centers (Tutoring Services, Supplemental Instruction, University Writing Center, Math Learning Center) - 122 Student Success Center
We are happy to provide immediate access to all academic support in the new LEED certified, state-of-the-art Student Success Center Building.

Learning Community Awards

Apr 21, 2015

Wright State University celebrated fifteen years of linked-class learning community cohorts on March 12, 2015, at the Learning Community (LC) Awards – also known as “the Elsies.” Learning Community Award recipients from 2000-2013 attended, as well as Wright State’s first Director of Learning Communities, Doug Saul, Dr. Lillie P. Howard, who founded the LC program at Wright State, and WSU graduate Holly Jackson, who was the program’s first Senior Peer Mentor.

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2000-2013 Learning Community Award Recipients

Seated:  Nav Brar, Patti Roberts, Valerie Felmet Corbet, Holly Jackson.

Standing:  Catherine Queener, Charles Long, Theresa Haghmazarian, Tonya Mathis, Mike Baumer, Brad Pompos, Alex Wenning, Doug Saul, Bobby Rubin, Laura Luehrmann, Amanda Spencer, Edwin Mayes. 

 

 

 

 

Also recognized at the ceremony on March 12, 2015, were nine special award recipients honored for their fall 2014 teaching of First-Year Seminars at Wright State.  

2014 LC Award Receipients

Seated:

  • Missi McCarthy, Peer Mentor, Doug Saul Award for Excellence in LC Instruction.
  • Pascale Abadie, Faculty, Outstanding Collaboration with Jasmine Hunsberger
  • Jasmine Hunsberger, Peer Mentor, Outstanding Collaboration with Pascale Abadie
  • Emily Simpson, Peer Mentor, Outstanding Innovation in Teaching

Standing:

  • Kari Simpson, Peer Mentor, Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities
  • Doug Petkie, Faculty, Outstanding Faculty Commitment
  • Alex Wenning, Staff, Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities
  • Craig This, Staff, Doug Saul Award for Excellence in LC Instruction
  • Amanda Spencer, Staff, Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities

About recipients and award categories:

Doug Saul Award for Excellence in Learning Community Instruction

A staff / peer mentor team were the 2014 recipients of the Doug Saul Award for Excellence in Learning Community Instruction.  Craig This and peer mentor Missi McCarthy taught a UVC 1010 themed Disaster History, integrating content from the linked Sociology course into their First-Year Seminar.  Focus on the sociology of disasters showed students how disasters can impact individuals differently based on race, gender, and class.   Craig This and Missi McCarthy introduced new Raiders into an academic community with an ethic of service, and they balanced magnificent planning with attention to individual student needs.

  • This category recognizes our LC seminar instructors who excel in several areas and serve as models of very effective LC instruction including:
    Strong integration of LC goals into the LC Noteworthy service to LC students
    Strong connections between the LC seminar and a linked Core Curriculum course
    Strong academic focus, content, & challenge Fostering a strong sense of community among LC students
    Strong ratings on the student course evaluations

Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities

Alex Wenning and Amanda Spencer were the winners of this year’s Holly Jackson Award for Outstanding Innovation in Co-Curricular Activities.  Two staff instructors mirrored classroom activities with powerful co-curricular projects, creating a unique series of opportunities for students to learn from leaders in the Raj Soin College of Business, the WSU campus, and the business community.     

Peer mentor Kari Simpson, supervised by First-Year Programs, was the third recipient of the Holly Jackson Award this year, for her learning community themed Human Behavior Psychology.  Highlights of this class include outstanding field trips, guest speakers, and effective follow-ups to specific challenges and opportunities.

  • The Holly Jackson Award category includes field trips, class projects that complement linked Core courses, service learning, and similar activities.  The category focuses mainly on out-of-class activities and experiences.

Outstanding Innovation in Teaching award

Peer Mentor Emily Simpson, with supervision from First-Year Programs, helped teach a UVC 1010 class about working on campus. She enhanced students’ First-Year Seminar experience with practical activities for securing jobs on campus now and good career strategies to use throughout their lives.

  • This category includes innovations which integrate technology into LCs, including use of multimedia, email discussions, etc. It also includes all other new and/or creative activities and strategies related to enhancing the teaching/learning experience. The category focuses mainly on in-class experiences and related work.

Outstanding Collaboration award

Faculty/peer mentor team Pascale Abadie and Jasmine Hunsberger collaborated with the Department of Modern Languages and the LEAP program to teach a splendid Languages and Cultures of the World learning community. This instructional team arranged for the participation of eight different professors from the Modern Languages Department, presenting on: Puerto Rico, Mauritania, Spain, Japan, Germany, Canada, France, and Brazil.

  • This category include collaboration between different colleges, between Academic and Student Affairs, between the LC instructor and linked Core Curriculum faculty, between instructors of different LCs, and between the LC instructor and various organizations, both on and off campus. The collaboration may involve development or revision of a learning community and /or planning LC events or projects.

Outstanding Faculty Commitment to a First-Year Learning Community

With the assistance of an able Peer Mentor, Dr. Doug Petkie taught a project- and discussion-based class for Physics majors. Engaging projects included measuring the speed of light and measuring the distance traveled by water rockets — made from 2-liter bottles, with cardboard fins duct-taped on, filled with water, pressurized by a bike pump, and launched in a field.

  • This award recognizes faculty teaching a university course linked to a first-year LC. Their significant/active role in the LC’s experiences exemplifies a commitment to first-year students and LC goals. Examples include class visits, joint field trips, and collaborations & consultations regarding course materials or activities.

Please join us in congratulating these dedicated First-Year Seminar instructors.
Catherine Queener & Jennifer Lobo
First -Year Programs, University College