FAQ

For Integrated Writing courses, do we still register for a separate “W” course in addition to the class itself?

For example, on quarters I would have had to sign up for ECON 200 and ECON 200W.

Answer:
There is no longer a separate "class" for the writing in semesters. So when you sign up for EC2000, you will have done all you need to do.

What is full-time status under semesters?

Undergraduate students: full-time status is at least 12 semester hours in one term.

Graduate students: full-time status is at least 6 semester hours in one term.

Wright State University charges a flat rate for tuition between 11-18 credit hours, for both undergraduate and graduate students.

Students with less than 11 semester hours will pay on a "per credit hour" basis.

Students with more than 18 semester hours will pay the flat rate for the first 18 semester hours and a "per credit hour" cost for credits beyond 18.

Will the university offer employees the fee remission benefit under semesters?

Yes, the employee fee remission benefit will still be offered under semesters. The tuition benefit for eligible faculty and staff is 8 credit hours per semester.

What will tuition costs be under semesters?

Tuition information can be found on the Bursar's website »

The tuition and fees for one academic year on semesters (2 semesters) will not exceed what the tuition and fees for one academic year on quarters (3 quarters) would have cost. However, it is important to note that:

1. Under semesters, students will pay fees twice per year instead of three times per year. A Payment Plan is available so you can spread your semester fees, including tuition, insurance, university housing, and other fees over three or four payments. View details »

2. Because a semester is about one and a half times the length of a quarter, charges for one semester will be approximately one and a half times higher than for one quarter.

3. If you receive financial aid, you will receive the same financial aid annual amounts per eligibility as established by the awards you receive. However, the amounts will be divided between two semesters as opposed to three quarters.

How will my quarter credits be applied to semester requirements?

All quarter courses now applicable to degree requirements will be counted toward degree requirements during the transition. Transition students will combine credits from courses completed prior to Fall 2012 with new semester courses to complete their degree requirements.

This formula will be used to convert quarter credit hours to semester hours:

Quarter hours × 2/3 (or .667) = Semester hours

Quarter Hours Equivalent Semester Hours
15 10
90 60
150 100

 

What times will classes be offered throughout the day after the transition to semesters?

Wright State will continue to offer day, evening, and distance learning courses after the transition. Please see the table below for scheduled class time blocks.

Monday/Wednesday/Friday Tuesday/Thursday
8:00 - 8:55 a.m.
9:05 - 10:00 a.m.
10:10 - 11:05 a.m.
11:15 a.m. - 12:10 p.m.
12:20 - 1:15 p.m.
1:25 - 2:20 p.m.
2:30 - 3:25 p.m.
3:35 - 4:30 p.m.
4:40 - 6:00 p.m.
6:10 - 7:30 p.m.
7:40 - 9:00 p.m.
8:00 - 9:20 a.m.
9:30 - 10:50 a.m.
11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.
12:30 - 1:50 p.m.
2:00 - 3:20 p.m.
3:30 - 4:50 p.m.
5:00 - 6:20 p.m.
6:30 - 7:50 p.m.
8:00 - 9:20 p.m.
How will degree requirements change?

You can see the semester degree requirements in the Programs section.

 

University Minimum Degree Requirements*

Degree Quarter Credit Hour Min. Semester Credit Hour Min.
Associate 90 60
Baccalaureate 183 120
Master’s 45 30
Educational Specialist 45 30
Doctoral 135 90
Doctoral w/ Relevant Master’s Degree 90 60
Professional Doctoral Degree Credit hour requirements vary by discipline.

*Note that some colleges may require a higher number of hours for graduation.

How will the semester transition affect me?

If you graduate before Fall 2012, it will not affect you at all. If you graduate after 2012, you will be a transition student. One of the principles that is guiding the current examination of a semester conversion is a pledge to students. Read the Wright State Pledge to Students.

Transition students will be fully informed through the use of intensive advising and frequent notifications of how to complete their degrees. Work with your academic advisor and use the online Course Planning Guides to plan completion of your degree requirements.

Commitment to Students
The transition to semesters should not adversely affect the time to graduation for students. To ensure this outcome, all students will be strongly encouraged to participate in the university's advising process and to follow the advice of their academic advisor. The transition should not increase the total cost of a degree.

When will the change occur?

The conversion to semesters will occur Fall 2012. The first day of Fall Semester 2012 is August 27, 2012.

What is Wright State's status?

The Semesters Transition Team, made up of faculty, staff, students, and administrators, is working to assure a smooth transition. The first semester begins August 27, 2012. All the tools you need to plan your path to graduation, including semester degree programs, course descriptions, and course schedule planning guides, are available in the Resources & Tools section.

What are the other universities on quarters and what are their plans?

The Ohio State University, Ohio University, the University of Cincinnati, Sinclair Community College, and Clark State Community College have approved the conversion to a semester calendar by Fall 2012. All 2-year state institutions will also be on a semester calendar by Fall 2012. The other nine state universities are already on semesters.

This move will align Wright State's calendar with other 2- and 4-year public institutions in the University System of Ohio (USO) and with more than 90 percent of higher education institutions across the country.

What are the advantages of changing from quarters to semesters?

Semesters provide several advantages to students, faculty, and staff. The semester system:

  • Provides more time for learning course material
  • Provides an opportunity for faculty curricula innovation
  • Provides more time for summer internships
  • Brings our courses in line with most textbooks, which are written on the semester calendar
  • Gives students a better chance at summer jobs because the school year ends earlier
  • Allows graduating seniors to enter the job market earlier
  • Reduces registration and financial aid activity from three times to two times per academic year
  • Brings our calendar into line with most of the state-supported universities in Ohio
  • Allows better scheduling of off-campus learning experiences, such as student teaching and clinicals
  • Promotes better scheduling of activities involving other universities and colleges, such as conferences and athletic events
Why is Wright State University changing from quarters to semesters?

The University System of Ohio Strategic Plan for Higher Education had called for all State of Ohio public universities on the quarter system to strongly consider converting to a semester academic calendar.

In response to this call, the Faculty Senate authorized an Exploratory Committee on the Transition from Quarters to Semesters to identify the tasks involved in undertaking such a transition. The objective of this committee was to recommend a semester calendar for consideration and to produce a transition plan and a timeline for completing the steps of the plan.

At its March 27, 2009, meeting, Wright State's Board of Trustees unanimously approved a resolution to convert the academic calendar from the quarter system to semesters.

Over 90 percent of the universities in the U.S. and nine of the 13 public universities in the state of Ohio are currently on semester calendars. The transition should produce a calendar that is in alignment with these universities to facilitate collaborative academic programs, student transfer, and articulation.

What is the difference between a quarter and a semester?
  • Almost all universities have an academic year of approximately 30 weeks. On quarters, the academic year is divided into three terms (approximately 10 weeks each); on semesters, the academic year is divided into two terms (approximately 14–15 weeks each). Both calendars offer a summer term.
  • In a quarter system, most courses are 4 quarter credit hours. In a semester system, most courses are 3 semester credit hours.
  • For undergraduate students, full-time status required a minimum of 12 credit hours on the quarter calendar and will require a minimum of 12 hours on the semester calendar.
  • For graduate students, full-time status required a minimum of 8 credit hours on the quarter calendar and will require a minimum of 6 credit hours on the semester calendar. Most full-time students will want to take a somewhat higher load (9–12 credit hours) to facilitate an earlier graduation.
  • University Minimum Degree Credit Hour Requirements*:
    • An associate's degree requires completion of a minimum of 90 quarter hours or 60 semester hours;
    • A bachelor's degree requires completion of a minimum of 183 quarter hours or 120 semester hours.
    • A master's degree requires completion of 45 quarter credit hours or 30 semester credit hours.
    • An educational specialist's degree requires completion of 45 quarter credit hours or 30 semester credit hours beyond a master's degree,
    • A Ph.D. degree requires completion of 135 quarter credit hours or 90 semester credit hours. For students entering a Ph.D. program with a relevant master's degree, 90 quarter credit hours or 60 semester credit hours are required,
    • For a professional doctoral degree, credit hour requirements vary by discipline.

    *Note that some programs may require a higher number of hours for graduation.

  • The tuition and fees for ONE ACADEMIC YEAR OF SEMESTERS (i.e. two semesters) will not exceed what the tuition and fees for ONE ACADEMIC YEAR OF QUARTERS (i.e. three quarters) would have been. However, it is important to note that:
    • Under semesters, students will pay fees twice per year instead of three times per year.
    • Because a semester is about one and a half times the length of a quarter, charges for one semester will be approximately one and a half times higher than for one quarter.
    • If you receive financial aid, you will receive the same financial aid annual amounts per eligibility as established by the awards you receive. However, the amounts will be divided between two semesters as opposed to three quarters.

MAP FAQ

Can I appeal decisions made under the MAP system if I think I’ve been unfairly delayed in graduating?

Yes, there is a process. Students with questions should meet with their academic advisors. In most cases, the academic advisor will be able to resolve any issues. If not, they can advise the student of the next step to take.

What if I calculate that I would have graduated at the end of Winter quarter under quarters, but my MAP says I will graduate at the end of Spring semester? Also what if I calculate that I would have graduated at the end of Fall Quarter, but my MAP says I will graduate at the end of Fall Semester.

Winter and Spring Quarters will be considered together as constituting the Spring Semester under the new calendar. In fact, because the Spring Semester will end earlier than the old Spring Quarter did (May vs. June), the end of the new Spring Semester will only be a few weeks after what would have been the end of Winter Quarter. This does not therefore constitute being forced to graduate “later” under the university’s Pledge to Students. In a similar fashion, graduating after Fall Quarter vs. Fall Semester are considered equivalent in regards to graduating at the same time.

What if I need to change my major after I’ve completed my MAP?

Wright State University advises students to change their major only after very careful consideration, and after meeting with an academic advisor to discuss the change. Majors can be changed, but a student only gets one chance to create a MAP—once submitted and approved, any subsequent change simply makes the MAP inoperative.  A student can continue to pursue a degree under the new major, but the university will no longer guarantee completion of the degree outlined in the MAP.

What if I choose to take a different elective than I listed in my approved MAP or wish to swap courses from one term to another?

If you choose to take a different elective than one you entered in your MAP, you should consult with your advisor to verify that the new choice is valid. Similarly, if you wish to swap courses from one term to another, you should check with your advisor to ensure the switch is appropriate and will not delay your graduation. Please be aware that deviating from your MAP will nullify your agreement with the university.

What if courses on my MAP are not offered when the Course Planning Guide says they will be?

The MAP represents an embodiment of the university’s Pledge to Students (Read the Pledge to Students).

If a student is forced off their MAP because a course is not offered when it was promised, it will be incumbent on the department and the university to find an equivalent course, or otherwise make arrangements to offer alternatives that will allow the student to graduate in the term designated in the MAP.

What do I do if the course I planned on my MAP via the Course Schedule Planning Guide is not offered?

Contact your Academic Advisor immediately.

Does my approved MAP impact when I can register for classes?

Students will need to register during the “Early Registration Period.” By doing so, they can better assure enrollment in needed classes. While Wright State University will do everything possible to enroll students who register after the Early Registration Period, the university cannot guarantee seats. The creation and approval of a MAP does not in and of itself guarantee a seat in needed classes. Students are encouraged to register at the earliest date available to them.

I am a University College student. Can I create a MAP?

An undergraduate student’s MAP will define his or her specific path that leads to the completion of his or her chosen degree. Because University College is a transitional unit, University College students will not create or finalize a MAP. University College students should see their advisor to create a course plan to get into the college of their major. For more information, please visit the Special Notice to Students in University College Students page. Download the Semester Quick Reference Guide for University College students.

When is the approved MAP due to my advisor?

MAPs will be available to create in Fall 2011. All MAPs must be approved by June 2, 2012, the last day of Spring Quarter 2012. University College students who will be accepted into their major by the end of Spring Quarter 2012 will be permitted to submit a MAP through August 17, 2012.

G-MAP

Can I appeal decisions made under the G-MAP system if I think I’ve been unfairly delayed in graduating?

Yes, there is a process. An appeal will start with the graduate program director of your program, then go through the academic department and the college in which your department resides. The director of semester conversion will be the final authority on all appeals.

When is the approved G-MAP due to my advisor?

G-MAPs are available to create now. All G-MAPs must be approved by the last day of Spring Quarter 2012, June 2, 2012.

What if I calculate that I would have graduated at the end of Winter quarter under quarters, but my G-MAP says I will graduate at the end of Spring semester?

Winter and Spring Quarters will be considered together as constituting the Spring Semester under the new calendar. In fact, because the Spring Semester will end much earlier than the old Spring Quarter did, the end of the new Spring Semester will only be a few weeks after the end of the old Winter quarter. This does not therefore constitute being forced to graduate “later” under the university’s Pledge.

What do I do if the course I planned on my G-MAP via the Course Schedule Planning Guide is not offered?

Contact your Academic Advisor or Program Director immediately.

What if my thesis research gets drawn out longer than I expected? Will the university be responsible if a research delay causes me to graduate later than my G-MAP says I should?

The university’s Pledge applies to all cases where a student may be forced to graduate later because of issues directly related to the transition to semesters. Extended thesis or laboratory research is a common occurrence, and will continue to be so under semesters as it has been under quarters. If your graduation date is delayed because of research delays that are not related to the semester transition, the university will assume no responsibility for that delay.

What if courses on my G-MAP are not offered when the Course Planning Guide says they will be?

The G-MAP represents an embodiment of the university’s Pledge to transition students. If a student is forced off their G-MAP plan because a course is not offered when it was promised, it will be incumbent on the department and the university to find an equivalent course, or otherwise make arrangements to offer alternatives that will allow you to graduate when your G-MAP says you should be able to graduate.

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