Educator/Author/Journalist

Dr. Manning Marable

"An Afternoon with Dr. Manning Marable"

Wednesday, January 9, 2008
Apollo Room, Student Union

Dayton native Dr. Manning Marable is one of America’s most influential and widely read scholars. Since 1993, he has been professor of public affairs, political science, and history at Columbia University, where from 1993 to 2003 he was founding director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. Under his leadership, the Institute has become one of the nation’s most prestigious centers of scholarship on the black American experience.

Marable received his A.B. degree from Earlham College in 1971 and his Ph.D. in American History from the University of Maryland in 1976. Before Columbia University, he was the founding director of Colgate University’s Africana and Latin American Studies Program from 1983 to 1987, chair of the Black Studies Department at The Ohio State University from 1987 to 1989, and professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder from 1989 to 1993.

A prolific author, Marable has written over 275 articles in academic journals and edited volumes. He has written and/or edited 24 books and scholarly anthologies. His most ecent books prominently include Living Black History: How Reimaging the African-American Past Can Remake America’s Racial Future, Race and Labor in the New US Economy (as editor with Immanuel Neww and Joseph Williams), and Racializing Justice: Disenfranchising Lives (as editor with Keesha Middlemass and Ian Steinberg). Also, he and Myrlie Evers-Williams, wife of slain civil rights worker Medgar Evers, have edited The Autobiography of Medgar Evers, a reconstruction of his hero’s life through his speeches, letters, and papers. Marable is currently at work on Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention and, as editor with Kristen Clarke Avery, on Seeking Higher Ground: The Hurricane Katrina Crisis, Race and Public Policy.

Marable is a national leader in the development of Web-based, educational resources on the African American experience. With Columbia’s Center for New Media Teaching and Malcolm X, respectively, he directed the production of two E-courses, a multimedia version of Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk, in 2001, and a massive multimedia version of The Autobiography of Malcolm X.

For almost three decades, Marable has written a political commentary series, Along the Color Line, which appears in over four hundred newspapers and journals worldwide. He is regularly featured in national and international media. He donates much of his time fundraising and speaking on behalf of prisoners’ rights, labor civil rights, faith-based institutions, and other social justice organizations.