Wright State University | Lake Campus

Feedback

The third Annual Summit, held Feb. 22, 2013 drew about 150 business and community leaders as well as Wright State officials.

Since its establishment at the Lake Campus in 2010, the Regional Summit has provided a networking opportunity in which the region’s business, political, community and university leaders discuss how higher education can be a partner in creating opportunities for the region.

Learn more about the event »

Feedback from the panel discussion moderated by Robert Sweeney, executive vice president of planning and secretary to the Wright State Board of Trustees is listed below.

Given what you’ve heard today, and your experiences, what are the biggest opportunities for your organization to pursue global strategies? Provide examples of best practices and successes.

Table 1

Wright State – incorporate international and cultural elements into majors. Opportunities to educate students about international affairs. Education – teaching practices around the world. Need to educate students about the international market.  Make students aware students that this is an opportunity to learn. Expand foreign studies. Attracting faculty members that have culture experiences and can bring diversity to the Lake Campus region.

Getting to know cultures even within the United States.  Must be aware of what culture you are approaching. Cancer Association has difficulties even within the United States.

Sociology courses. Strategicfication in class. Outsourcing and globalization affects the economy. Students need to understand how economies in other countries can affect us here in the United States. Challenge to make students aware that every aspect affects them. The cost of diesel does affect them.

Banking Industry – Local farmers having money locked up globally. Technology can allow them to assist clients globally. 

Using technology to bridge the connection globally.

Table 2

  • Opportunity to educate citizens on what it means to compete in the global market place. Why is it important for the average person to understand where we fit into the international framework? Diversification is important to long term economic health at the regional level.
    • Example: Honda’s impact on the local economy—Tsunami in Japan affected local companies. Tool and die manufacturers took advantage of opportunities to join the supply chain.
    • Crowne Corp is another example of how local companies can compete on the global market. Interesting to observe how important local labor and talent pools are to this effort.

Table 3

  • Economic Development – trip to Germany next month – likely prospect for investments in Northwest Ohio – especially from the supply sector to follow the Japanese Companies who have made an investment into the region.
  • Delegation to Midwest US Japan Association annual conference in Japan this year (Tokyo).
  • Working with consulting firms who are international in their scope – Lead Development Companies that identify firms who have expansion plans in the next 18 months – essentially international matchmakers.
  • Attending several international trade shows with companies who exhibit around the world.
  • Online connections through online marketing.
  • Expanding youth (high school) exchange programs through career coaching and helping students expand earlier into international exchange.
  • Consulting with global companies and working with tolerance and understanding of global counterparts.
  • International companies want to know that they are accepted at a local level.
  • New Neighbors organization that welcomes new commerce
  • University can help promote local international activity and cultural events that can help to welcome global business partners.
  • Economic Development works to promote a structured interaction between global companies, communities and the university setting to develop future business potential.
  • University and arts organizations could welcome, coordinate, and tabulate international performance venues and opportunities that engage cross-cultural opportunities (clearance house per say).
  • Business Enterprise Center could offer cultural etiquette and training courses.
  • There is a need for local companies to have access to students who are better prepared to enter a global workplace with an engrained natural cultural understanding.
  • Cross-reference international students – Is there a promotion to bring international students to the local campus as well as send our students to international schools?

Table 4

  • Guide people to the state global marketing division of Ohio.
  • From econ dev point of view, now is a good time to market the US to foreign companies and recruit companies to come back to the US.
  • From a development standpoint, educate smaller companies of opportunity to grow global business.
  • Per successes, Cap in Celina and Honda in Marysville are successes. Several other companies have come toward our region who have international business operations.
  • Europe is not the Euro point was valuable and should be expanded on for businesses. Strategy for who the person on the ground is, is key. Companies can train people to be managers abroad and apply those principles before sending people overseas.
  • Leads to curriculum in schools—even foreign language courses required in colleges don’t produce students able to speak the language. International business and cultural differences coursework is not prevalent.
  • Intellectual property theft is an issue out of this. Protect your good ideas, Minster machine example from years ago where Chinese put Minster name on products and sold it. We can’t do enough to protect that from happening. Other examples exist. Your man on the ground is important.
  • Know your market and the company you are buying is vital. Do you acquire a company in a foreign country or build your own there? Be honest and self-reflective on what is happening with your company, mistakes and otherwise. The CEO spending half of their time planning is a valuable point. Japanese engineers spend so much time planning to the point of frustration for American companies.

Table 5

  • Small Business Perspective (EMI): Just started expanding into Mexico (opportunistic for automation in the plastics industry)
  • Best Practices: Training is important. Exposure to foreign language is useful (working knowledge of the language is useful).
  • Globally owned company perspective (CAPT - Foundry owned by Japanese company): Communication is challenging (translators not available 24/7).
  • Best Practices: Bringing the leadership team and founders back in the trenches for a while is useful.
  • Challenges: Long hours; Very competitive industry; Work-Life Balance.

Table 6

  • WSU-Language program; offer access to Rosetta Stone.
  • Sister universities- exchanges
  • Connection between business and education-getting it to students
  • Sister cities organizations

Table 7

  • Engage students in different situations in different countries. Yena, Germany students will be taking classes, robotics and will tour factories. They will then be sending students here to Wright State. Growing opportunity for internships abroad.
  • They will be reviewing business processes.   
  • Make the students part of a project, learning and actually working on it together. In a year timeframe? Emerson’s experience is that you must speak the language and understand the culture when dealing with other countries. Must have a blend to compete in that country. Need to have an understanding of what are the same processes that are universal and what are unique to that specific area.
  • Haiti does not like change, had to convince that there are better ways. Teaching involved to show others that their way can be improved upon. Although, it cannot be forced on them. He provided the example of the homes that were built their way and some his way and after 5 days of rain, their homes mud washed away, but Ben’s homes were still standing, even after earthquakes.
  • Celina Moving helps companies move their employees overseas when they have to go for a temporary assignments. Creating awareness that a local company can help relocate employees overseas.

Table 8

  • Internationally within WSU providing students with a global experience—over 1100 international students. China and Middle East are largest. Support students in travel abroad programs and student exchange programs. Students are not prepared to think about global travel (many don’t have passports, etc.). Providing opportunities for students to experience cultural events.
  • How do you increase the potential for Lake Campus to engage in international students? How can we diversify our student population? Largest students populations are engineering and graduate at Dayton Campus.
  • China & Turkey will be opportunities that are currently planned.
  • Opportunities for summer internships to link those students to internships here. Students can link up with global companies HERE and could potentially move back to their home countries and take the skills home.
  • Manufacturing strength HERE in west central Ohio—opportunities to link up international students with culture.
    International students need housing. How can we engage international students? How can we attract international students? How can we give students the experiences?
  • Crown has a global presence, growth will happen outside the US. China/Europe/Brazil and they see that growth as their biggest opportunity. Seasoned US employees to companies overseas. How can we help their companies to learn more about various cultures so they can be prepared for what they will encounter? What are US students/employees opportunities for learning?
  • Potential to blend engineering internships abroad along with local companies in their overseas facilities. Invaluable experience in both international/local
  • Best thing to happen at Lake Campus is engineering. Next is internships. We need to engage both together.
  • If you want your university to engage in something like this—be a local company offering local opportunities overseas.

Table 9

  • Educational point of view (WOEF Brd, K-12, Rhodes State, WSU)
    • Prepare kids for global strategies by creating opportunities to learn more about different cultures (different ways of conducting businesses).
    • Provide international, educational exchanges as this area may be quite isolated.
    • E.g. career exploration opportunities
    • E.g. global business communities exposures
    • Maybe important to experience failures as part of growing experiences
    • Opportunities to learn different responsibilities (long-term visions for the area)
    • Wapak education offers three foreign languages (German, Spanish, and French)
    • St Marys offers French & Spanish
    • Depending on the needs, provide other foreign languages to students
    • Setex has sponsored exchange programs (Japan)
    • Lake Campus students have chances to go to different countries
    • K-12: reading, math, writing are the core curriculum of K-12, so the program tries to focus on those and keep the rest out
    • Local students need to be trained to go out into other foreign markets
    • WSU LC programs could be designed to incorporate foreign country experiences (e.g. Engineering dept should make it a mandate to include foreign country experiences)
  • Banking perspective
    • People from other countries (e.g. India, Mexico, etc.) open businesses in local areas, so the staff at People’s banks should be trained to work with those foreigner to better provide business opportunities.

Table 10

  • Increase exposure of youth in region to international experiences. 
  • Expand outreach to international companies for business attraction (participation in trips to meet with international companies)
  • Work with local companies to provide technical assistance for expansion into global market through acquisition or import/export assistance

Table 11

  • From university perspective, tapping into global opportunities to send students abroad as well as recruiting international opportunities. Additional endeavors in online education are endless from both and international and local perspective.
  • Hospital perspective mostly serves local community. There is an international interest for medical staff purposes. The largest growing perspective comes from tele-health.
  • Midmark difficulty finding IT folks to improve global perspectives. Best IT inidividuals not necessarily interested in Versailles, OH. The IT individuals need to understand cultures, systems, etc in other countries to work well as an IT.
  • When individuals are recruited to this area, what can WSU assist in to that transition?
  • WSU is branching with international schools to offer curriculum. Programs for 2+2+1 where international students spend first 2 years in their country then final 3 at WSU. They complete the program with both a Bachelor and Master’s Degree.
  • Want to encourage WSU into study abroad programs, where is the funding? How do we encourage and fund that.
  • How does Mercer/Auglaize/Darke County tap into resources of UD, WSU, etc? (ex. IT, marketing)

  • BEST PRACTICES:
    • WSU (both campuses) aligning with international programs where both programs benefit. Exchange of knowledge, students, benefits.

Table 12

  • Passports, Language, any second language, US travel less than many we do business. Less willing to reach out and live overseas. Learning curve on culture is not too bad. Business practices overseas is quite different. Family oriented and fear of living in some areas.
  • Development program—9 mos. To 2 years in HR, than some time in Business, then Operations. Then can across the functions within in the US or not. More confident to reach out globally.  Makes them a little more eager to branch out.
  • ESL for Japanese–speaking employees but we do not provide Japanese for our English speaking employees.

Table 13

  • Match making for firms wanting to pursue global opportunities.
  • Work with competition. Start slowly. Go to country. People that go need to have significant background with US firm before going. You need to take the time to research the market you are entering completely before even thinking about going to another country –years of following the other company.
  • Look to match up with a foreign company with the eye to working together. You need to know customer base, product… the other firm has expertise in other products. Find complementary products or skills that allow for synergy between the companies.
  • Not necessary to be able to speak in foreign language. You can often get by with broken English and 20 words of the foreign language.

Table 14

  • Make an effort to make those coming to Minster feel welcome (example- Some individuals coming from a global region do not know that a coat is required in January in Minster) and those going from minster to other regions feel comfortable.
  • Customer driven (keep in mind what the customer wants… for example other regions prefer beer and tea in cans (this is either to ship, manufacture, etc. than bottles)
  • Participate in the global growth; contribute to other countries through manufacturing
  • Best practice- Compete regionally by becoming regional (see first bullet)
  • Best practice- if our area is deep with German heritage then try to work with Germany first (try to draw connections with other regions so they seem less foreign and intimidating)
  • You need language skills and regional contacts
  • It takes time, commitment, research, etc. to be a “player” ‘in the regional market. Those who “fail to plan” before jumping into the global market “plan to fail”
  • WSU- the local need is for WSU to provide more language and culture relate courses/ opportunities
  • Success- Chinese Service Center 2 years ago; keys to that success- becoming part of a larger group that already had a global presence (so lots of time and energy is not spent trying to create a global presence)

Table 15

  • The businesses represented at our table are not really into the global strategies sector. We are all, however, interested in all cultural events. Cultural events help bridge that gap between what our culture teaches us and what other cultural traditions.
  • We may not be working globally, but we are working with clients that may be from different countries, or our business clients are working globally.. We are trying to develop a niche or understanding of other industries that may be coming to our area. 
  • Honda, for example, we need to understand the language and culture so we can serve those clients best.  We care about who they are, where they come from.. Knowing what kind of questions we can ask so we are not offending or being discriminatory.
  • We all just want to be able to serve the needs of our clients, no matter what their background.
  • Study abroad opportunities are critical for College students to get a global view.

What, in your experience, are the biggest barriers or obstacles to pursuing global strategies? Provide relevant examples of what you’ve learned from recent challenges.

Table 1

Cost – the expense of pursuing global strategies.

Risk – Making a major investment, buying a product, time and effort.  Much easier to say no than to accept the challenge. 

A challenge is to cut spending while still trying to pursue other ventures. Hard to keep an open mind. American Cancer Society turned down Susan G. Comen. Not assuming that something here will work there. Need to accept that something is not right/wrong, but needs to be accepted. 

Barriers to involve students is to “stay close to home.” It is hard to leave their roots for an extended period of time. Social media can help bridge the barrier. It is a way to stay connected while being gone.  Can help break through perception. 

Table 2

Language and culture are barriers.

Equipment and systems are often not compatible due to the difference in standards and building codes. Bringing products in from other countries requires a reconciliation these issues. Example: Crown lift trucks must meet higher safety standards in different countries. Concern and pressure to keep the American infrastructure intact. Citizen’s worry that we lose jobs with the global market place influence.

It is still a challenge to attract talent—especially technical disciplines like engineering—to come and then to stay long term in the more rural areas.

Table 3

  • Attitude
  • Lack of Knowledge and understanding
  • How do you combat rural brain drain if you encourage local talent to move into an international business component? A lot of people do move away and come back after experiencing life abroad or in another urban community. Local Quality of Life is the selling factor.
  • Fear of ability to put down roots and establish a community connection wherever you go (and ability to effect quality of life).
  • Lack of interest by company management
  • Lack of understanding about international business etiquette and culture.
  • Inability to network with international companies that may come to the region.
  • Engaging community with training on how to interact with a prospective global company.
  • Language barriers
  • University – offer foreign language immersion programs during the summer.
  • Sometimes we feel so far removed from the global environment because of the remoteness of our area. This is a huge obstacle – even though it is not necessarily true.
  • The University should encourage even domestic travel so that students are comfortable and familiar with traveling and working in different environments.
  • Fear. If you’re hesitant to do things in a new environment, you’re never going to fit.

Table 4

  • Intellectual theft.
  • lllogical regulations:
    • Maylasian example of “tuition payments”—payoffs, hidden taxes, didn’t realize the cost of going overseas. Political relationships cost a great deal, expect to pay to play. Rules change frequently with each new leader of a company there. Corruption is rampant across the world, but you can remain principle centered.
  • Build relationships and do good wholesome projects overseas to help break the barrier and prove your worth. Park projects, etc.
  • Power outages (India) example, almost daily—infrastructure issues which we take for granted. Potable water, reliable rail, cell service, etc.
  • A big issue could be getting wealth out for smaller companies. A lot of developing countries have trouble here. Slow out, no out, etc. Fall down rate of what you take away, may not be worth it. Wealth locked up and you can’t make it. Make it there, spend it there theory. I.E. ten percent of profit for a company in Mexico must be paid to the employees. Employees take off to spend the money, or leave permanently, creating worker productivity issues.
  • State and national, city holidays decrease productivity—Sao Paulo Brazil example. Avanulo contributed many of these examples of barriers. Work week is shorter in France, for example. Penalties for overtime, 9 weeks of vacation in France, etc. Productivity affected. You don’t know until you go.
  • Int’l Trade Office can help with packaging, customs, tariffs, foreign trade zones, etc. But knowing it doesn’t change the culture of the country you may locate in.
  • Is there due process for a company overseas who experiences these issues?

Table 5

  • Barriers: Gap between vision and execution is a huge problem, particularly in global expansion.
  • Need for careful thinking to go from opportunistic expansion to strategic expansion.
  • Important for controlled growth and gradual increase in investment to support growth.
  • Fear of the unknown.
  • High cost of entry is a barrier.
  • Language barrier is challenging.
  • Lack of numbers in core talent (experience and skills).

Table 6

  • Limited cultural diversity in area.
  • International Payment systems.
  • Knowledge – keep learning. Language barrier, cultural differences.
  • Generational differences – older people don’t deal as well with a global community.

Table 7

  • Fear.
  • Don’t try to do too much at once. Spot on what they know about America, but do not understand us as individuals. Preconceived notions on how Americans will be. Politics and understanding different business practices. Understanding who to turn to locally and globally. Immigration policy – high skilled, low wage at this time. Matching up skill sets with what jobs available.
  • It takes time to get to know us as Amercians. Her son lives in Finland and the people there want to talk about American politics. Took a long time to get to know people. Delegates of SE Asia came to Lake Campus asking questions about how to start a university, etc and things we find normal, they don’t understand. One major question was “how do you get people to serve on the board without paying them”? Is there an international chamber of commerce?

Table 8

  • Crown—cultural, understanding needs of overseas businesses (electrical, etc.), want to be an incredible option for the industry. Engage the talent needed to make everything happen in overseas markets.
  • Course that covers international regulations, cultural opportnies. How do you bridge the gaps with
  • Mercer Health efficiencies—will never go global. Same applications that occur overseas still apply to their field.
  • National/international legalities course—how can we prepare students for something like this? International business is a concentration (or maybe a degree) that WSU offers. How can we share degrees/concentrations that are currently being offered at Dayton campus to offer the courses here at LAKE?? Students see the potential for employment down the line because of the experience and their knowledge.
  • Once we get the momentum going it will speak for itself.
  • Cost sharing with student in overseas internships. Companies that need this type of opportunity might be able to provide assistance as well.
  • Can the new grant be part of this conversation?
  • Back to business—is this the next step? Add international flavor to educate students for international opportunities.
  • New regulations for bachelor’s degrees have opened the doors to expansion and degrees that might be more beneficial to our LOCAL communities.
  • Barrier to Business is accreditation. Types of faculty that can teach courses. Internal barrier.
  • If local businesses can show needs that they NEED their employees to have the experience and knowledge
  • International studies here in local area. Targeted to seasoned employees and well round them for what Crown is looking for. Engineers/sales/marketing etc.
  • School of medicine to share best practices in overseas experiences with local hospitals.

Table 9

  • Time (it may be very time consuming, taking approx. 45 steps to complete the process/requirements…)
  • Money
  • Lack of competent staff in the area
  • May need more internship/coop opportunities?
  • Lack of diversity in the area

Solution idea: enhance opportunity through student competition at high school/college levels

Table 10

  • When trying to expose youth to international experiences, inflexibility in school schedules (time, money, regulatory requirements)
  • Lack of research/data on existing local companies and needs/interest for international expansion/joint ventures.  (Have experienced problems matching international companies wanting joint ventures to domestic companies.)

Table 11

  • One large barrier is language. Not having international individuals within the organization now. Having an individual that has a cultural background, knowing industry, knowing government and understand business globally.
  • From strategy, where do you expand to? How do you know where to expand?
  • Obstacles - geopolitical risks, investment in infrastructure (are there ways to reduce through parternship?), governments
  • Turkey, Brazil, Vietnam, Bosnia are 4 markets that have a yearning for American Higher Education. Obstacle- as a state institute there are certain priorities and parameters that they must fulfill within Ohio

Table 12

Developing initial presence. Simply exporting will not work. Develop relationships. Someone from the company will be integrated in the company. Sometimes you make the wrong acquisition. What was unique about their approach might have made them successful in their culture but when we came in, our approach did not work and the company was not profitable and the acquisition failed. Must have a formal structured approach when going globally or in an venture. Due diligence and our process is followed.

Table 13

  • Largest barrier is to find balance between what each party is providing or not providing. For example what are the rewards and consequences of actions?
  • Understand regional differences in how companies operate. How loosely or strictly companies are run varies tremendously from China to Germany.
  • Travel and language is less of an issue in Europe than in Asia. In Asia firms are very flat much fewer layers of management. Germany decisions are more collaborative. In Asia fewer people make the decisions.
  • The strategic reason to go to some country has to be what drives the expansion not just to diversify.

Table 14

  • China- legal red tape & paperwork needs to use local lawyers, advisors, etc. who are familiar with how China businesses run)
  • Because of the socialization of many European countries you have to go through many more hoops to make things work
  • Balancing the values America holds dear versus other countries (example- some countries are not as environmentally conscious as American countries strive to be)
  • China- “rules are run by person”; America- “rules are run by law”
    • Local policies may be different from global policies
    • Who you know could mean all the difference
  • How do you find the global contacts to coach you through their local customs etc.?
    • Companies look for cooperation/ joint ventures with an existing company that is similar but has a different niche
  • You need to already have profitable company before you can invest and grow globally

Table 15

  • The barriers that we have determined are: 
    • Money, language barriers, culture differences. 
      • MidMark – the things that they do oversees, and how they do them, are different than what we do in the US.  European countries may work more laid back than our culture. They close stores on Sunday, they have different working hours, working life is just different in every country.

How can higher education help facilitate global outreach within our region?

Table 1

  • Increase study abroad programs. Partnerships with universities and institutions around the world.
  • Incorporating global view into courses.
  • Teaching them about differences in rules, laws, regulations in different countries. Plant the seed in opportunities in a high school student.
  • Recruit instructors with foreign background.
  • Use technology to learn different languages.
  • Create more partnerships with local companies that are global who could provide foreign language instructors. Sharing resources to create relationships.
  • Allow experiences to live the language and the culture.
  • Ethnic festival on campus.
  • Need students to understand and be sensitive to other cultures, and not have the opinion that everyone needs to learn English. We need to learn their language and culture as well.
  • Come up with different perspectives on how and why students to travel to other countries. Bring them to a country to learn solely about food, etc.
  • No longer learn just from a book. Social media and visuals can be used to learn.
  • Universities can ask companies what they need and improvements that can be made.
  • Creating ambassadors, it doesn't have to be a committee that can get things done.

Table 2

  • Become a portal to the world through the classroom and distance learning tools
  • Encourage study abroad to get students into the global market place for a glimpse of how business is done in other countries.
  • Increase emphasis on learning other languages and cultures—can this become more of an institutional priority?
  • Academic based study abroad programs that allow for a real world-applied experience in the student’s classroom.
  • CULTURAL awareness programs on campus can help build important etiquette skills that will also build self-confidence with international interactions.
  • Work with local firms who are competing in the global market place to identify areas where technical talent is needed.
  • Four year curriculum that includes international content in the classroom. We have an MBA but no bachelor degree in business.
  • Continue to build emphasis on STEM disciplines that will produce people who will stay in the area.

Table 3

  • Promote passport awareness!
  • Encourage (require?) international AND domestic travel
  • Offer foreign language immersion programs during the summer.
  • Work on cultural immersion experiences
  • Encourage openness first, but understand that there are many cultures to choose from. Then offer multiple opportunities.
  • Tabulate local cultural and global initiatives, companies, and training programs.
  • Find ways to encourage cultural diversity – programming, travel, investment decisions, economics, etc…
  • Integrate the local international residents into the community.
  • Work to welcome companies by working with local small businesses to prepare them for interaction with global citizens (Work with restaurants on how to prepare foods that will make international residents feel at home, etc…).
  • Promote cultural speaking engagements throughout the year.
  • Encourage people to live life on the edge!

Table 4

  • Really teach foreign language
  • Refer people to the states global marketing division
  • Provide assistance through International Trade Assistance centers of the small business development network.
  • Connect with the expertise of companies with international business experience to guest teach, share, provide mentorships and experiences for students.
  • Perhaps a global business readiness course which includes the above. Need more than a book, the speakers today had what people need to know.
  • What about foreign language choices and usability? Which one do you pick? And you have to be proficient in the language.
  • Takes less time with each language you learn. Brain works to adapt (Avanulo)
  • Needs to happen earlier than college...younger learns better. “more time when younger”
  • US culture for students is different than many other countries who have to raise their children in a fortress mentality. Little or no social that is safe, so study at home, listen to US movies and music, learning the English language as well.

Table 5

  • Need engineering and manufacturing background.
  • Study abroad opportunities, bring more international students.
  • Language skills training.
  • Get students more well rounded.
  • Internship overseas.

Table 6

  • Be less insular, exposure to bigger world.
  • International trips- travel and education abroad
  • Online – skype links to other countries.
  • Mentoring, help connect what students enjoy with an education and career path.

Table 7

  • Speaker mentioned not having a passport. Probably not a way for the Lake Campus to help with that, but it is a difficult thing for students that come here have to deal with. Six months to work thru getting a Visa, very expensive process. Faculty position received interest from international people, but immigration will not allow over a certain number of international people in the US. Visiting students programs. Provide opportunities for meet-and-greet to get together.
  • Talked about that process with his wife and how expensive and how much paperwork is involved.
  • Difficult for students that are immigrating here as they might be sent back if they drop class. Base security clearance is difficult to add to staff at the Dayton campus of foreign faculty.
  • To continue to hold functions like the Regional Summit.

Table 8

  • Finding someone within the campus to champion the program and finding the business model that works. Taking a chance and moving forward. Challenges in aspects of the program that will help make the program better. Community support needed.
  • Certificate programs if local chambers could define the local needs. International business for engineers. How can we engage the local companies to find their needs? How many students can we engage? What do we need to make the project effective? Community input needed. Similar to that of how engineering happened.
  • Outreach needed—and it takes time. ENGAGE local companies. Stick your neck out!! Engineering enrollment was a surprise. It is always a gamble. Perception that manufacturing has moved to Mercer/Auglaize counties from the city. Manufacturing boom going on. Farm boy are drawn to mechanical engineering degrees. CS needs more students. Manufacturing is computerized so you need those skills. New model is programming automation. Programming skills are a necessity. Changing the way programming is changed. People today don’t know programming languages today. Logic/structure flow isn’t being taught in HS.
  • Degree programs that are so strict that they don’t take courses from other disciplines. Silos. People don’t understand what other people do and it can cause so many issues—regardless of the field/discipline.
  • Reflection of the time that there is so much more detail/knowledge that you’ve got to know and it crowds out other information.
  • State constraints. We have to graduate students in less time and take the right classes.

Table 9

  • Local companies to assist higher education in providing global opportunities (e.g. more overseas’ trips, support foreign exchange programs)
  • LC could collaborate with other universities to offer more programs (e.g. more 2+2 program)
  • In the past, City of St. Marys and WSU sent 15 students to Japan (can we do more of that?)
  • Increase/improve relationship between universities and local companies so that job opportunities become more transparent and available to potential employees and university graduates

Table 10

  • Provide opportunities for high school and college-level students to gain exposure and knowledge about other countries/cultures (speaker series, competitions, international travel opportunities)
  • Provide research and information on existing international trade/global business activities taking place among local business community
  • Create partnerships between educational providers & businesses for international travel and internships

Table 11

  • Prevalent language barrier, cultural barrier within higher education students as well as current workforce within companies.
  • Facility a mini-series for cultural understanding for adult learners. This will help to facilitate company expansion and acceptance of more diverse cultures. This is applicable for international companies, the healthcare industry, recruitment, etc.

Table 12

  • More international opportunities such as trips for students. Partner more with global educational institutes.
  • Create opportunities so that international travel is sought.  Broaden their exposure. Speakers, host international students. Shared classrooms-classes here but also in Singapore for example. Guest Professors. Cultural language. Expose them to spoken and written language as well as the real culture of the country and people, not just what they see on TV.
  • At earlier ages, we need to expose them to International trips through schools  and cultur e.

Table 13

  • Having foreign language fluency is not always necessary but it is certainly helpful. In particular getting students in to foreign countries is very helpful like exchange programs.
  • Having this foreign experience is life changing for our youth. It opens the eyes of these students and firms value students with these experiences.
  • Even at firms that have no global presence or will never have a global presence the student with international exposure is valuable to demonstrate how they have the willingness or attitude to try new things, accept new ideas, and take initiatives. They are also more open minded and often can appreciate our area.

Table 14

  • Summer semester (or any semester) abroad opportunities (market this; help fund this; etc.)
    • A short excursion as a visitor is not the same as having a long, dedicated experience that requires the student to become immersed in the culture and language
  • Continue to support the MBA program pursuing global opportunities/ travels focused on real-world curriculum related items such as economics
  • Global speakers on campus (“if we can’t take speakers oversees, bring them here”)
    • Someone the students would be excited about seeing who could talk about their roots and other things that make students get a sense and comfortability with a different culture 
  • Market/discuss “hometownopportunity” because this is where businesses have a chance to talk about what they are doing and highlight things of interest
    • Many students are not aware of the businesses in their own backyard and their global scope
  • Career Services- Impressive on the Dayton Campus but not at Lake Campus
    • We discussed how the drive to see a Dayton Campus advisor seems to be such a challenge for students and a compromise could perhaps be Skype appointments with a Dayton Campus Career Services advisor.
      • Could a space on campus be dedicated to Skype appointments for opportunities such as this?

Table 15

  • Provide international studies and opportunities to travel abroad. 
  • Continue to have cultural experiences for the students – music, food, direct interactions with specific cultures.  Maybe some of these interactions could be mentorships?
  • Expose students as much as we can to cultural experiences
  • Develop a sister university so we can have interactions with other cultures. 
  • Bring students of other cultures to our campus to discuss differences in our cultures.
  • Maybe a person of cultural difference could serve on our WOEF board or someone that can serve on a committee here at Lake to assist in bringing different cultures to our attention, but also that could encourage other cultures to attend the Lake Campus.
  • Make freshman college students to take a cultural course and strongly encourage them to really get cultural experience.