Overview

photo of honors housingMany first-year Honors students choose to live in the Honors Residence Hall, a 384-bed facility that opened in Fall 2002. The entire building is arranged suite-style with two double rooms sharing a bathroom. All floors are co-ed. The building boasts several unique features, including two electronic classrooms, a common kitchen, and meeting and lounge space. There is also a game room, a fitness center, a coffee shop, a convenience store, and a TV lounge.

A central core connects the three distinct wings: East, North, and West. The building is fully accessible. A large parking lot is located behind the North Wing. A small courtyard makes outdoor activities inviting. Every floor has a student Resident Assistant; the building also has a Community Director--a professional staff member--who lives onsite and oversees programming activities.

The North Wing houses several Honors Living Learning Communities, including engineering, pre-med, and service learning. These residential groups often study together, engage in group service projects, and take several classes together. Some students choose to continue the practice of taking common classes beyond the first term.

The building also provides space for Honors student organizations to hold meetings and social activities. A sense of community is further enhanced by faculty fireside chats, the occasional Honors Dialogue, open mic nights, film series, and other special events. All Honors students, whether or not they live on campus, are invited to all events in the Honors Residence Hall.

Honors Faculty-in-Residence

Arvind Elangovan

Unique to the Honors Program is the Honors Faculty-in-Residence, Arvind Elangovan.  Arvind has both an apartment and an office in the building. Also a faculty member in the history department, he teaches Honors classes, sponsors unique programs, leads field trips, and is available for supplemental advising.  Arvind does not handle discipline issues or tell you what courses to take, but he is available to discuss graduate school plans or other general academic issues. Learn more about Arvind Elangovan on the Honors Program Staff web page or visit the Residence Services' Honors Community website.

Testimonials/Statements from Students

photo of two students in honors housing"Living in Honors housing at Wright State is a great way to connect to other Honors students on campus. There is a strong bond between the residents in the Honors Hall because of the dynamic group of people that live in Honors. It is definitely worth living in the Honors Hall and enjoying the close knit community with others who are in your classes and who live with you on a daily basis." -Chad Warnimont

"I think that it is this serious scholastic attitude that has allowed us to form such a tightly woven community. No one is afraid to approach others about anything that is going on in their life. I have only lived here for a month now, and I have made some friendships that are sure to last a lifetime." -Cayti Zelnio

"I particularly enjoy the Honors housing for a lot of reasons. Mainly I think I like it so much because there are other people like me. Since everyone is an Honors student, we have a lot of the same needs - quiet hours and the like. But it's not just people sitting around and studying all the time - we have a lot of fun, too. I've made some really great friends. Plus, everyone who visits our dorms are super-jealous because they're really nice." -Erika Fleeher

"Honestly, I love Honors housing. If I ever need help on an assignment, I am positive that someone here will be able to help me. For example, I often proofread papers written by people in my hall; they all know I enjoy doing it and I am glad to help them out. It's great! " -Krista Thiel

"The thing I like the most about the Honors housing is the floor space. I don't feel crowded and I can dance when I listen to music (only when no one else is there, of course)! I also really appreciate the quiet hours. It's really nice not to hear music blaring when I am trying to cram for a test or I want to sleep. There is also a lot of drawer space." -Karen Dickey