And Then They Came for Us: Fred Korematsu and His Fight for Justice -- Speaker: Karen Korematsu

Friday, March 22, 1 pm to 3 pm
Campus: 
Dayton
109 Oelman Hall
Audience: 
Future Students
Current Students
Faculty
Staff
Alumni
The public

This is the first in a series of events...

And Then They Came for Us: Fred Korematsu and His Fight for Justice -- Speaker: Karen Korematsu

Karen Korematsu, the daughter of Fred T. Korematsu, a prominent civil rights activist, public speaker, and educator, will be presenting. Until his death in 2005, Fred fought for the civil liberties of all communities. Having refused a detention order in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, he presented his case to the Supreme Court but lost in a 6-3 decision. Eventually, Fred Korematsu received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998. His case is a reminder that our constitutional rights must be vigilantly protected and that the claims of military necessity for the protection of national security should not exempt decision-makers from being held accountable.

Karen, Founder and Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute, carries on her father’s legacy as she addresses post 9/11 issues, drawing on lessons from the past.

Friday, March 22, 2019, 1:00 p.m.
109 Oelman Hall,
Wright State University

Saturday, March 23, 2019, 3:00 p.m.
Building 14 (Health Sciences) Atrium,
Sinclair Community College

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Can Culture and Humanity Prevail Over Prejudice and Injustice --Speaker: Dr. Bonnie Clark

The forced eviction of 120,000 people of Japanese descent from their homes along the West Coast of the United States and their subsequent incarceration in desolate sites during World War II are pivotal moments in world history. Decisions leading to these events were later attributed to “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.” Some of the incarceration camps are being excavated and proving to be significant resources for developing a greater understanding of this shadowed part of Japanese American history. Dr. Bonnie Clark will be discussing her recent archaeological findings, which provide insight into the plight of the detained and incarcerated Japanese Americans as well as their struggles to build community and reclaim their humanity.

Saturday, April 6, 2019, 3:00 p.m.
Dayton Metro Library, Downtown
215 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio

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These events are sponsored by...
Wright State University's Office of Latinx, Asian, and Native American Affairs, The Japanese American Citizens League - Dayton Chapter, Sinclair Community College, University of Dayton School of Law, and Dayton Metro Library.

With additional support from...
Asian American Council of Dayton, Dayton International Peace Museum, League of Women Voters of the Greater Dayton Area, and Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education

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The events are free and open to the public. For more information, please call the Office of Latinx, Asian, and Native American Affairs at (937) 775-2798 or visit www.wright.edu/lana.

For information, contact
Mia Honaker
Administrative Support Coordinator

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