Conference Schedule

On this page:

Virtual attendee meeting rooms

Online live streaming will be available. Please use the links provided that correspond with the location you wish to attend for each keynote or workshop. If you intend to join us via live streaming, please let us know of your accommodation needs. In order to maximize securing accommodation requests, we ask for 1 week notice. If less then 1 week notice, we will strive to make this happen. If you have any questions regarding live streaming prior to the conference, please contact Jared Embree at jared.embree@wright.edu for assistance.

These links will take you to OmniJoin, which may ask to install software on your computer.

 


 

 

Friday, September 22

8:309:30 a.m.

  • CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
    Apollo Room

9:00 - A Calling In led by Sierra Leone

9:3011:00 a.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Opening doors: An Introduction to Cripp Sexually
    Endeavor Room A

    Galen Spiegler
    Wright State University graduate, American Psychological Association member, and disability advocate
    My experience is that the general public is not adequately educated about the lives of people with disabilities. My immediate efforts are to provide much-needed information leading to better understanding and inclusion. My ultimate goal is sexual justice for all abilities.
  • Re-Theorizing The Self Through An Ethic of Care
    Endeavor Room C

    Emese Ilyes
    The Graduate Center, The City University of New York
    This session is an attempt to intervene in psychology’s violent past and troubling present by calling for notions of “care-ful” practice, compelling us to recognize and celebrate the permeable, porous, flexible boundaries between bodies and selves. With this heuristic of care, this paper hopes to trouble the separation between rigor and relational responsibility, to trouble objectivism, to oust the illusion of cool rationality.
  • Navigating Sexuality and Sex Education for Adolescents with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
    Discovery Room A

    Joanna Ball
    A discussion of the landscape of sexuality and sex education for adolescents with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Perspectives will include educators, service providers, families, and individuals with disabilities.

FEATURED SPEAKER

  • CripSex - An Embrace of Sexual Pleasure for Political Productivity
    Atlantis A

    Bethany Stevens
    Queer sexologist and doctoral student in Sociology at Georgia State University
    This workshop will discuss the radical potential of active engagement with cripsex for disability movements, communities, and realms of critical disability studies. Discussions of cultural and material barriers to sexuality will include an examination of issues impacting the ways disabled people find potential (a)sexual partners (e.g., access - lights/ing, physical hostility, proximity to transit, alcohol free environments; advertising; websites). These issues prompt powerful queries to engage with the politics of pleasure in our lives, and explore its (re)generative personal and community values.

11:15 a.m.12:45pm 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

  • We Were Never Broken: Disability Justice and the Development of a New Desirability Politic
    Apollo Room

    Stacey Milbern
    Ableism is so profound that conversations about worth and desirability can be extremely difficult to have.  Disability justice activist Stacey Milbern will explore the connections between disability, race, gender, size and sexual orientation using storytelling and media with the belief that together we can develop a new desirability politic that transcends everything we've been taught about our bodies. Join us for this invigorating conversation that will leave you buzzing for more. 

12:452:00 pm

  • LUNCH
    Apollo Room

2– 3:30 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Centering the Self: Exploring the Benefits and Barriers to Self-Care in the Lives of Marginalized Advocates
    Endeavor Room C

    Nicole Carter, Ph.D. and Destinee Beisemeyer
    Wright State Women's Center, Division of Student Affairs; Wright State Counseling and Wellness Services, Division of Student Affairs
    The presenters will engage participants in a discussion and workshop style session that is centered on the intersections of sexuality, disability, and the care of self. We will explore self-care in relation to its connections with issues of disability and sexuality. Furthermore, we will explore barriers related to accessibility (physical, emotional, monetary, local, and temporal) as well as ways to overcome those challenges.

FEATURED SPEAKER

  • Andrew Gurza and Cripple Content Present DisabilityAfterDark: Introducing the Queer Cripple
    Discovery Room A

    Andrew Gurza
    Disability Awareness Consultant and Cripple Content Creator
    This workshop will introduce you to a part of the Queer Community we rarely discuss – Persons with Disabilities who identify as LGBTQ+ (The Queer Cripple).   Queers with Disabilities are sorely underrepresented in our homo-normative, body beautiful culture, and I aim to change that.   A combination of education and personal experiences will invite you into a conversation around the Queer Cripple, the lived experiences navigating both sexuality and disability (ie. What it actually feels like to be queer and disabled), and what they can offer the LGBTQ+ community overall.   Participants will openly explore the mythology and fear around sex and disability, and consider why we are afraid to talk about disability in the LGBTQ+ community.    Ultimately, through frank, open and honest conversations around disability, sexuality and queerness, the workshop will provide the tools to welcome the Queer Community into the conversation around disability and make it truly accessible to everyone under the rainbow.

 

FEATURED SPEAKER

  • "Miss Disa-Burly-Tease" - Burlesque Performance and Q&A
    Atlantis Room A

    Jacqueline Boxx
    Jacqueline Boxx, an award-winning burlesque performer with disabilities, speaks about burlesque’s role in body positivity, and the art’s potential for altering public perceptions of disabled bodies, in addition to a review of her own experiences. She will then perform her act "Microaggressions," which has been featured in the "Best Debut" category at the 2017 Burlesque Hall of Fame. After the performance, she will conduct a brief Q&A with the audience.

4–5:30 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • The Trouble with Tinder: Online dating with a disability
    Endeavor Room A

    Elizabeth Mazur and Erica C. Tachoir
    Penn State University, Greater Allegheny Campus
    Approved for 1.5 Clinical Psychology CE and 1.5 AASECT CE credit
    This roundtable plans to draw upon both the experiences of attendees and the scientific literature on relationships and online dating to discuss how the nine steps of online dating described by Finkel and colleagues (2012) might be similar or different for persons with disabilities as compared to persons without disabilities.
  • Taking back the cradle: Disability culture as a strengths-based approach to parenting
    Kara Ayers, PhD Assistant Professor
    Associate Director of the University of Cincinnati Center for Excellence on Developmental Disabilities
    People with disabilities have historically been denied basic reproductive rights and freedoms. Dr. Kara Ayers, co-founder of the Disabled Parenting Project, will lead an interactive presentation and discussion related to the current state and experiences of parents with disabilities. This presentation and discussion will utilize a cross-disability approach.

 4–6 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Scarlet Road Documentary
    Endeavor Room C

    Rachel Wotton
    Scarlet Road: (A film by Catherine Scott, Australia, 2011).

    This session will involve the viewing of the documentary Scarlet Road, followed by live streaming Q and A with Rachel Wotton. 

    Impassioned about freedom of sexual expression, Australian sex worker Rachel Wotton has become highly specialized in working with clients with disabilities. Rachel’s philosophy – that human touch and sexual intimacy can be some of most therapeutic aspects to our existence – has made a dramatic impact on the lives of her clients, from improved mental health to actually regaining body movements. Scarlet Road is a documentary that follows Rachel as she strives to increase awareness and access to sexual expression for disabled people through her foundation, “Touching Base,” which works to gain rights for sex workers and end the social stigma and discriminatory practices that surround their occupation. In addition she obtains a MS in Sexual Health, all to further her mission to end the stigma placed on two marginalized groups.

FEATURED SPEAKER

  • At the Intersection of Queerness and Disability
    Atlantis Room A

    Eli Clare
    What issues do disabled LGBTQ peoples face? What are the connections among ableism, homophobia, and transphobia? How do issues around queer disability identities fit into a broader intersectional social justice framework? Join Eli for a facilitated dialogue about these questions and more.

5:30–6:30 p.m.

POSTER SESSION in Apollo Room

  • Thriving After Burns: Application of Disability Affirming Therapy
    Mindy Merricle, BS., Nicole Freeman-Favia, BS, Megan Wade, BS, Julie Williams, Psy.D., ABPP
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    Burn injuries tend to leave deep scars that are cosmetically disfiguring. This will impact individuals sex life and any intimate relationships that they may have. This poster will address burns and the rehabilitation process through disability affirming therapy. There will also be a focus on how intimate relationships are impact through the burn and how sex therapy can be applied with individuals who have experienced burns.
  • When the internet attacks: solidarity and compassion
    Nicole Freeman-Favia, Mindy Merricle, BS., & Megan Wade, BS. School of Professional Psychology Doctoral Students and Julie L. Williams, Psy.D., ABPP School of Professional Psychology Professor
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    This poster will offer a review of the literature with personal narratives on hate crimes in cyberspace. In particular evidence of the increased risk and vulnerability to women, racial minorities as well as members of the LGBT and disability community will be provided. An argument for solidarity and compassion for victims in the form of a community response within cyberspace will be made as a strategy to shut down cyber bullies and cyber mobs and stop the hate.
  • The Intersection of Arts and Disability
    Erin A. O'Grady, Psy.M
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    This poster includes a literature review discussing the intersection of arts and disability with a focus on its positive psychological impacts, future considerations regarding access, and a summary of disability arts programs nationally and internationally.
  • Breaking Bias: Addressing Stigma Concerning Disability and Sexuality
    Dr. George Gaither, and Mary Elizabeth Ford
    Ball State University
    This poster will examine whether or not people with and without disabilities agree with stigmas concerning disability and sexuality. It will also address if people with disabilities seem to internalize these stigmas as well as what, if any, effect internalizing these stigmas has on the well-being of people with disabilities.
  • Providing Sexuality Education for Children/adolescents with Developmental Disabilities
    Janeece Warfield, Gokce Ergun, Sarah Love, Christina Zawalski, Amy Sanders, Kaitlyn Eichinger, Amanda Wallace, & Sam Gauvin
    Wright State University -School of Professional Psychology
    Conversations about sex are often uncomfortable for many parents/caregivers. Children with disabilities are three times more likely to be victims of sexual assault than children without disabilities. This poster will provide parents/caregivers with the tools to discuss sexual education to their child with developmental disabilities
  • Healthy Campus Partners Changing Campus Culture
    Tessa Miracle
    Wright State University
    The Healthy Campus Partners consortium provides multi-campus support allowing implementation of the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s 5 recommendations for preventing & responding to sexual violence through evidence-based training, environmental strategies & direct intervention. One goal of HCP is to broaden the scope of sexual violence discussion to include the voices of those with a disability. If you are interested in collaboration or student leadership opportunities, stop by our poster!  
  • PleasureAble: The Exploration of Sex and Disability
    Shay A.L. Frederick, B.A., Melanie K. Stephenson, Psy.M., & Michelle S. Schultz, Psy.D.
    Wright State University -School of Professional Psychology
    This poster will discuss the availability of information about techniques to increase sexual pleasure, the use of toys, and partnered sex for individuals with disabilities. In addition, this poster will feature information about barriers to fulfilling sexual experiences and recommendations to further destigmatize the sexual lives of individuals with disabilities.
  • Grace and Frankie – Myths, Perceptions, and Stigma
    Cristina Chevere, Ashley Evans, David Oblinger II, Elizabeth Campbell, and Michelle S. Schultz, Psy.D.
    Wright State University -School of Professional Psychology
    The purpose of this poster was to examine perceptions associated with sexuality and aging as highlighted in the hit Netflix series, Grace and Frankie. A literature review of relevant books and professional journals was conducted to examine the common myths, stereotypes, and assumptions individuals hold towards sexual expression later in life in conjunction with the biases discussed throughout Grace and Frankie.
  • Never Too Old to Play: An Examination of Available Sex Toys for Aging Individuals
    Anahli Patel, Psy.M., Elizabeth Turner, Psy.M, Carly Deremo, Peyton Jones, & Michelle S. Schultz, Psy.D.
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    The purpose of this review is to investigate the marketing for sex toys as it relates to aging individuals. This analysis will also include qualitative data to highlight the very real disparities that exist for this population. Further, interviews with reputable, and inclusive, sex toy providers will be conducted to investigate the needs that exist. This project aims to bring sex and aging to the forefront, combat the paucity of research, and illuminate the unnecessary societal repercussions. The goal of this poster is to identify potential resources and provide recommendations for further study.
  • Relationships between Autism Spectrum Disorder Related Symptoms and Sexuality
    Cassandra Aker, Dr. George Gaither
    Ball State University
    This research assessed the relationship between symptoms characteristic of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and aspects of sexuality. Collected data tested the following hypotheses: these symptoms would more strongly correlate with aspects of sexuality than an overall diagnosis, and specific symptoms would correlate with sexuality aspects more strongly than other symptoms.
  • Impact of Fertility Loss Resulting from Cancer Treatment
    Jill Klotzman, Psy.M & Julie Williams, Psy.D., ABPP
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    Causes of infertility are varied. One population at risk for infertility is individuals treated for cancer with chemotherapy and/or radiation. Although these treatments have improved survival rates, they also impair reproductive abilities. Increased survival rates, coupled with delayed childbirth, have increased the need for fertility counseling prior to cancer treatment.
  • Mindfulness & Yoga-Based Interventions for Sexual Functioning Symptoms Associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Ryaja Johnson and Caroline McClellan with Jeremy Schumm, PhD
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    This literature review explores mindfulness and yoga-based interventions as treatment of sexual functioning symptoms associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Studies indicate a genuine effect of mindfulness and yoga interventions. Mindfulness and yoga improve sexual functioning by moderating attention and breathing, decreasing anxiety and stress, minimizing distraction, and enhancing body awareness.
  • Alison Kafer’s Feminist, Queer, Crip; Revitalizing Disability Studies
    Melanie Stephenson, Psy.M., Erin Sherrets, B.A., Julie Williams, Psy.D., ABPP
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    The purpose of this poster is to provide a review of the book Feminist, Queer, Crip written by Alison Kafer. Kafer emphasizes the importance of intersectional philosophies that include gender, sexuality, disability, economic status, age, race, ethnicity, and other diversity variables. Additionally, there is a focus on the systemic exclusion of disability rights as a social and political issue as well as specific recommendations for intersectional social justice movements.
  • Movement as a Treatment Modality for Sexual Dysfunction as it Relates to PTSD
    Caroline McClellan Ryaja Johnson  with Jeremy Schumm, PhD
    Wright State University- School of Professional Psychology
    While the official DSM-5 symptoms of PTSD are commonly known, what is often less talked about is the accompanying issues regarding trust, relationships, sexual functioning, and intimacy. This poster looks at some of the literature that discusses using mindfulness movement (i.e. Yoga) as an accompanying treatment for PTSD in order to heal both mind and body in the furtherance of regaining sexual functioning and intimacy.
  • Examining the Intersection Between Sexual Stigma and Psychiatric Disabilities
    Darrell Kelly, Jr., M.A., Psy.M., Steven D. Kniffley, Jr., Psy.D., MPA, ABPP, and
    Julie L. Williams, Psy.D., ABPP, Wright State University – School of Professional Psychology
    The expression and performance of sexuality is an essential and a core element of an individual’s health and well-being (Volman & Landeen, 2007; World Health Organization, 2017). An individual’s identity variables, lived experience, culture, society, and family influence the expression of a person’s sexuality. However, society can limit the expression of sexuality for individuals who identify as a person with a disability. The experience of expression and performance limitations by individuals with a disability is further compounded when they identify as a sexual minority. Specifically, individuals who have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disability have been stigmatized for wanting to explore or express their sexuality (Rowlands, 1995; Volman & Landeen, 2007).
    The stigma related to sexuality that individuals with a psychiatric disability could manifest in a number of ways. For example, when individuals with a psychiatric disability seek out psychiatric services, many providers are hesitant or avoid discussing patients’ sexuality, even though the medication can impact their sexual functioning (Ostamn & Bjorman, 2013; Peuskens et al., 1998). Additionally, when individuals with a psychiatric disability seek out therapy, the mental health professionals are also hesitant about discussing their sexuality because therapists fear the individual cannot manage their sexuality or it might increase the risk of inappropriate behavior (Kelly & Conley, 2004; Ostamn & Bjorman, 2013). Lastly, many healthcare professionals are not providing sex education because of the stigma related to individuals with a psychiatric disability engaging in sexual activity. (Kelly & Conley, 2004; Ostamn & Bjorman, 2013).
    This poster will explore the literature related to the stigma experienced by individuals who identify as having a psychiatric disability and their subsequent sexuality expression and performance. In addition, this poster will highlight recommendations to reduce the stigma associated with this population.

8–11 p.m.

FRIDAY NIGHT ENTERTAINMENT: DANCE in Apollo Room 

Come and enjoy great music, great community, and more at the Friday night DANCE!

 


Saturday, September 23

8:309:30 a.m.

  • CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
    Apollo Room

9:3011 a.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Autistic Gender Nonconformity: Navigating Narratives of Pathology
    Endeavor Room A

    Xeno Washburne
    University of Michigan
    Using ethnographic methods, I analyze experiences and narratives of autistic transgender people in the United States juxtaposed with medical interpretations of autistic gender non-conformity. I explore relations between gender, disability, embodiment, and autonomy as crystalized in the experiences of transgender autistic individuals and their resistances to medical narratives of pathology.
  • Disability Justice: a Framework and Practice of Embodiment
    Endeavor Room C

    Stacey Milbern
    Have you heard the term Disability Justice this week but aren't sure what exactly it means or what the difference is between it and disability rights? Do you know why disability justice work must be led by disabled people of color? Come to this informative session with disability justice thought leader Stacey Milbern to learn more about the disability justice framework and how to apply it to your work.
  • Lessons Learned From A Critical Feminist Disability Studies Dissertation
    Discovery Room A

    Rebekah Moras
    University of Alaska Anchorage, Center for Human Development
    Approved for 1.5 Clinical Psychology CE and 1.5 AASECT CE credits
    Anti-sexual violence and disability systems are coming together to improve service delivery for survivors. This session will introduce a feminist mixed methods dissertation evaluating a sexual violence prevention curriculum. The majority of the session will be a philosophical discussion about tensions between normative sexuality research/evaluation, and Disability positive perspectives.
  • When Reproductive Rights are Stolen
    Discovery Room B

    Eileen Cronin
    When a child is born with a disability, who holds the rights to her medical and reproductive information? With a discussion of the philosophical, legal, ethical, and human rights components,  Clinical Psychologist and Author of one of Oprah’s Best Memoirs of 2014, MERMAID, Eileen Cronin, PhD, will talk about what happened after she was born inexplicably without legs in 1960. Her parents were told it was “God’s Will.” In 1962, the entire world found out that there was a pill (a teratogen) called thalidomide that was causing children to be born with missing limbs but Eileen was only two years old. Injuries from teratogens are not passed on to offspring. Genetic mutations can be passed on. Does a child have the right to her own medical information?  At what age should she be told? What happens when her rights are stolen? Who is responsible when medical information is denied that would allow an injured person to a) plan a family, and b) file a lawsuit against a drug company. And who is responsible for her life of medical bills, including two artificial legs, every five years?

FEATURED SPEAKER

  • Stolen Bodies, Reclaimed Bodies
    Atlantis Room A

    Eli Clare
    Oppression often lodges in our bodies, stealing them away from us in a myriad of ways. What stories do each of us have to tell about this thievery and the ways in which we resist it, working to reclaim our bodies? Using storytelling, images, and journal writing, this workshop explores these questions and issues across various identities, communities, and systems of oppression.

11:15 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER Emi Koyama in Apollo Room

  • Intersex Activism at the Intersection of Disability and Gender Justice
    Apollo Room

    Emi Koyama
    Since its inception in the early 1990s, intersex activism has emerged from a group of disgruntled former patients finding each other for the first time (and this is pre-internet!) to a movement impacting culture, medicine, and the United Nations human rights bodies. It did so by connecting with movements for liberation for women, LGBT people, people with disabilities, and many others. Emi Koyama has been involved in the intersex movement since early 2000s and helped the movement to incorporate and embrace disability justice perspectives (although it wasn't called disability justice yet) and will address how critical disability theory and movement continues to inform movements for intersex and gender liberation and vice versa.

12:452 p.m.

  • LUNCH
    Apollo Room

2–3:30 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Building Relationships and Changing Social Norms: A Friendships and Dating Program for Individuals with ID/DD
    Endeavor Room A

    Karen M. Ward, Julie P. Atkinson, Katie Lancaster
    University of Alaska Anchorage, Center for Human Development; Wyoming Institute for Disabilities
    Approved for 1.5 Clinical Psychology CE
    Romantic relationships are important in the lives of adults with ID/DD. This session presents information on an innovative evidence-based intervention designed to teach social skills necessary to develop healthy, meaningful relationships and to prevent violence in relationships for adults with ID/DD.
  • Gadgets and Gizmos: Returning the fun to sexual function
    Endeavor Room C

    Lucky J Tomaszek
    Education Coordinator, Tool Shed Toys
    If we work with our body, instead of against it, we often find that we are capable of experiencing more than we thought possible. This session will discuss tools, toys, aids and devices to help facilitate sexual health, function and pleasure. Welcoming to all genders and orientations.
  • The Raped Bodymind: Reading Disability and Sexual Trauma
    Discovery Room A
    Molly Keran
    University of Michigan
    What does disability studies say to survivors of sexual abuse? Are survivors disabled? And how might  crip readings of representations of sexual violence? I explore the connections between disability studies, trauma theory, and feminist criticism in order to theorize the interdisciplinary epistemological value of narratives of sexual violence.

FEATURED SPEAKER

  • "The Mind: Dance Theory for Mobility Restrictions" Workshop
    Atlantis Room A
    Jacqueline Boxx
    This class looks at the mindset and method behind adapting dance movements when your mobility is restricted, whether through disability, injury, or other physical limitations.  It is applicable to any movement-based performance. How can you safely dance when you're unable to perform certain steps without injury?  What are the dangers of "pushing through," and how do you cultivate stage presence without sacrificing care and concern for your body?  This class is devoted to disability theories and self-care practices and includes group discussion as well as a brief meditation.

4–5:30 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Wheeling through college and into a sexual self-identity
    Dicovery Room A

    April B. Coughlin
    State University of New York at New Paltz
    For many of us with disabilities, college is where we have some of our first experiences with true independence, self-identity building and sexuality. This presentation will explore these areas of self-growth by providing a variety of perspectives and experiences as well as a space for open discussion.
  • Women with physical disability within the Sexual Rights Discourse in Nepal
    Discovery Room B

    Shubha Kayastha
    Chaukath
    This study explores experiences of women with physical disabilities about their sexualities within social norms and values in Nepali society. In such situation, the study tries to present how the women are seen in dating culture and how they experience it, and showcase their perceptions about their own body image.

FEATURED SPEAKERs

  • Embracing Negative Survivorship and "Unhealthy" Coping
    Endeavor Room C

    Emi Koyama
    This is an informal presentation combining story sharing and discussion intended for survivors of sexual abuse and our friends and other members of our support systems (you know who you are). Negative survivorship is an approach informed by the principles of harm reduction as well as the work of sick and disabled activists and others that seeks to build an alternative to the compulsory optimism and hopefulness of the commercialized trauma recovery industry and to increase our individual and collective capacity to support survivors coping in whatever ways we can.
  • Teaching Our Libido to Speak Crip
    Atlantis Room A

    Maria R. Palacios
    National Women with Disabilities Empowerment Forum/President 
    We all have sexual needs, sexual hunger, and desires.   It is part of our human experience.  However, people with disabilities have been, and sadly continue to be, marginalized, segregated and forced into asexuality simply because of our differences.   The fear driven approach to the disabled body has kept people with disabilities isolated and excluded from the common circles of sexual discussion and opportunity for honest and positive representation of the disabled body as a natural sexual being.  This ninety minute interactive workshop addresses and undresses crip sexuality with honesty and raw awareness of our disabled bodies as being worthy of pleasure and physical love.

4–6 p.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Queer & Crip Justice- 5 Skills for creating more intersectional & inclusive communities
    Endeavor Room A

    Petey Peterson, M.Ed and Michelle Vaughan, Ph.D.
    Wright State University
    Approved for 1.5 AASECT CEUS credit
    The Office of LGBTQA Affairs at Wright State University offers three core educational programs. One of those educational programs we call Spectrum Sessions. A spectrums session is a presentation designed to be customizable for a range of audiences and topics. Spectrum Sessions are developed to give different audiences a bevity of skills and knowledge within a short amount of time. For the Breaking Silences Conference, we have created a Spectrum Session entitled: Queer & Crip Justice- 5 Skills for creating more intersectional & inclusive communities. During this session, we will first gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of sex assigned at birth, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, and romantic orientation. From there we will discuss the intersections between Queer & Trans communities and Crip communities. We will end with teaching 5 skills for creating more Queer & Trans and Crip Inclusive spaces and communities. This will be an interactive session led by the Director for the Office of LGBTQA Affairs who will encourage participants to actively discuss and share throughout, as we are all experts of our own experiences and identities.

    Approved for 2.0 Clinical Psychology CE

8–10 p.m.

SATURDAY NIGHT ENTERTAINMENT: SPOKEN WORD AND POETRY in APOLLO ROOM

Join us in the spirit of solidarity for a night of spoken word and poetry on September 23, 2017 from 8-10pm. Spoken word has been used as a form of self-expression for the last few decades. It is a freer form of poetry that contains messages that are often political and provoking, discussing issues such as discrimination, race, gender, ability, class and sexuality. Our desire is to use this form of self-expression to celebrate our differences and similarities. It is a space to share the struggle and fight for liberation. All voices and intersections are welcome. No experience required. Just come with an open mind and open heart. If anyone needs accommodations to participate please let us know. Peace.

 


Sunday, September 24

8:309:30 a.m.

  • CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
    Apollo Room

9:30-11 a.m.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Rainclamation: How installation art can reclaim space
    Endeavor Room A

    Erin Davenport
    Undergraduate Student, Davidson College
    Rainclamation is an installation art project that combines wax painting and erasure poetry to reclaim the space around elevators from an area of stigma fraught with the experience of being "seen" as a disabled body to one of beauty in relishing in a disabled identity that inspires art.
  • Self-Injury, Desire, Pleasure and Kink
    Endeavor Room C
    CJ Johnson
    San Francisco State University
    What are the possibilities of looking at self-injury as a queer experience of a sexual encounter? Furthermore, how could kinky sex act in a reparative manner or as a way of reducing harm around self-injury? Based on interviews with adult LGBTQ self-injurers these questions are explored.
  • Birth Control Is for EVERYONE!
    Discovery Room A

    Kristin C. Freeman
    Sexuality Educator
    Worried that birth control and infection prevention are for able-bodied cisgender women only? Join Kristin Freeman, Certified Sexuality Educator, as she presents the latest in reproductive technology available for ALL people!

FEATURED SPEAKER

  • Do Me Differently—An In-Depth Discussion around the lived experiences of Queers with Disabilities
    Atlantis Room A

    Andrew Gurza
    Disability Awareness Consultant and Cripple Content Creator
    This workshop will introduce you to a part of the Queer Community we rarely discuss – Persons with Disabilities who identify as LGBTQ+ (The Queer Cripple).   Queers with Disabilities are sorely underrepresented in our homo-normative, body beautiful culture, and I aim to change that.   A combination of education and personal experiences will invite you into a conversation around the Queer Cripple, the lived experiences navigating both sexuality and disability (ie. What it actually feels like to be queer and disabled), and what they can offer the LGBTQ+ community overall.   Participants will openly explore the mythology and fear around sex and disability, and consider why we are afraid to talk about disability in the LGBTQ+ community.    Ultimately, through frank, open and honest conversations around disability, sexuality and queerness, the workshop will provide the tools to welcome the Queer Community into the conversation around disability and make it truly accessible to everyone under the rainbow.

11 a.m.12:20 p.m.

TOWNHALL MEETING/ OPEN MIC

Apollo Room

Facilitated by Eli Clare
This open mic session will provide a space for attendees to share their conference experiences. The format will provide a space for both those who share and those who listen to process the events of the three-day experience. This time will also be utilized for people to make connections with attendees and discuss possible next steps in an effort to allow the momentum of the conference to continue.