Anatomy Master's Program

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Certificate Program in Anatomy

The Certificate Program in Anatomy is a two semester program that provides graduate level education in three of the four human anatomy core courses—microanatomy, gross anatomy, embryology and neurobiology. These courses cover basic cell biology and the microscopic survey of human tissues, dissection of the human body, development of the human body and structure and function of the human nervous system. The program is applicable to nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, physician assistants, athletic trainers, health and physical education majors and others in allied health disciplines. The intensive coursework requires a full-time commitment.

Objective:

To provide the essentials of human anatomy for students who have an interest in anatomy but do not want to pursue, or who do not need, a master's degree.

Admission Requirements:

Applicants for admission are expected to meet the general requirements for admission to the School of Graduate Studies with regular or nondegree status. Although there are no required prerequisite courses, it is recommended that applicants have completed at least two years of biology, including vertebrate anatomy, and two years of chemistry, including organic chemistry.

Program Requirements:

Students must complete microanatomy, gross anatomy, embryology or neurobiology with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 to earn a certificate. Total credit hours must not exceed 18 hours. Written permission to enroll in each anatomy course must be obtained from the appropriate course director. The program of study chart below shows the three combinations of courses that are available the Certificate Program.

Combination 1:

Semester
Course Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Fall
ANT 7210
Human Microanatomy
5
Spring
ANT 7110
ANT 7150
Human Gross Anatomy
Advanced Human Embryology
6
3

Combination 2:

Semester
Course Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Fall
ANT 7210
Human Microanatomy
Human Neurobiology
5
4
Spring
ANT 7150
Advanced Human Embryology
3

Combination 3:

Semester
Course Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Fall
ANT 7310
Human Neurobiology
4
Spring
ANT 7110
ANT 7150
Human Gross Anatomy
Advanced Human Embryology
6
3

 

Core Course Descriptions:

ANT 7110: Human Gross Anatomy
Although three 1-hour lectures are given each week, the focus and concentration of the course is dissection of the human body. Three 3-hour laboratories are scheduled per week for a total of 12 class hours per week. Substantial unscheduled time is required to complete the scheduled work. Additionally, students are expected to explore human cross sectional and radiographic anatomy using computer-based technology. A team of four students assigned to a single donor typically accomplishes the dissection.

ANT 7150: Advanced Human Embryology
The course addresses the development of the human body, including gametogenesis and early development, development of all major organ systems, and the function of the placenta. A major portion of the course is comprised of descriptive embryology. Mechanisms and clinical relevance of developmental abnormalities are also incorporated into the course. In addition, the experimental techniques of modern developmental biology are discussed.

ANT 7210: Human Microanatomy
Microanatomy is concerned with the functional morphology of cells, the chemical composition of cellular components, the origin of specific cell types, and the histological and ultrastructural survey of the tissues and organs that comprise the human body. Approximately 4 weeks are devoted to cell biology; the remaining 10 weeks focus on the histology of tissues and organs. The cell biology portion is entirely a lecture format, while the histology portion includes laboratory sessions with the lectures.

ANT 7310: Human Neurobiology
The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to the structure and function of the human nervous system. Neuroanatomical and neurophysiological principles are presented within the framework of current research strategies aimed at investigating common clinical neurological dis orders. Students are exposed to diverse learning experiences that include neuroscience laboratories and case problem-solving sessions in addition to traditional lectures and conferences.

 

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