Wright State University
2009-10
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History

Introduction

The purpose of the Master of Arts program in history is to provide broad but intensive training for students who intend to pursue careers as professional historians, whether in teaching, research, or archival or historical preservation fields, or for those who desire strong historical backgrounds for other vocational or avocational objectives. The program offers opportunities for specialized study and research, but without neglecting the breadth that characterizes historical work at its best. In recognition of the fact that students’ interests and goals are varied, the program provides a choice of three plans (see the following details), all of which lead to a Master of Arts degree. This program is approved by the Ohio Board of Regents.

Admission

Decisions regarding admission to the graduate program of the Department of History, continuation in the program, and dismissal from it will be made by the department’s graduate studies committee. The candidate must meet the requirements of the graduate school, hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, and meet a minimum grade point average (3.0 or better in history and 3.0 overall). Each candidate shall also include a statement of goals, three letters of recommendation, and a writing sample. The GRE is not required. In special cases, a candidate with a grade point average below 3.0 may be admitted on conditional status with the approval of the department’s graduate studies committee. Conditional status may be granted upon a favorable committee recommendation based upon the candidate’s application and interview with a director of the graduate program.

A strong candidate will have substantial undergraduate course work in history, or a major in the field. An applicant without such a background may enter the program but may be required to take deficiency work as prescribed by the graduate studies committee.
A graduate student in any college of the university may take up to three graduate history courses without prior approval of the Department of History. Any student desiring more than 12 credit hours of graduate history courses must secure the approval of a director of the graduate program.

Candidates for admission should abide by the following deadlines: July 30 for admission in the Fall Quarter, November 1 for admission in the Winter, and February 15 for admission in the Spring.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Arts degree can be earned through one of three plans. The Thesis Plan is intended primarily for those students who expect to continue graduate work or who need or desire the full range of professional experience, including intensive research and writing. It assures training in research techniques and the preparation of scholarly papers, culminating in the submission of a thesis. The Course Intensive Plan is intended primarily, but not exclusively, for students not expecting to pursue doctoral studies. The Public History Plan is a program designed for graduate students who are primarily interested in careers in historical or archival administration, or in museum management. It provides students with both theoretical and practical training in these areas.

For the purpose of planning advanced courses and seminars, each student should consult a graduate director regularly. A student receiving two Cs will be placed on academic probation and will be required to appear before the graduate studies committee to justify his or her continued participation in the program. Upon review of the student’s progress, the graduate studies committee may dismiss the student from the program.

Faculty

Professors
Jacob H. Dorn, United States: 20th century, intellectual, religious
Edward F. Haas, United States: South, urban and public history, Civil War
Paul D. Lockhart, Early Modern Europe: Scandinavia
John W. Sherman (Chair), Latin America: Mexico, 20th century, political

Associate Professors
Martin Arbagi (Emeritus), Ancient: Roman, Medieval, and Byzantine
Susan B. Carrafiello, Modern Europe: Italy
Carol Engelhardt, Modern Europe: Great Britain, gender, religious
Nancy Garner, United States: Women’s, West
Barbara Green, United States: African American, South, Reconstruction
Marjorie McLellan, United States: Public History, social
Roy L. Vice, Early Modern Europe: Reformation, Germany

Assistant Professors
Awad Halabi, Middle East
Noeleen McIlvenna, United States: colonial, revolution
Timur Pollack-Lagushenko, Europe: Medieval, France
Sean Pollock, Europe: Russia, empires
Harvey M. Wachtell (Emeritus), United States: colonial, Jacksonian Era, Ohio
Jonathan Winkler, United States: diplomatic, military

Financial Assistance

The Department of History awards a limited number of tuition scholarships and assistantships annually to qualified students. Assistants are usually assigned to faculty members to aid in research, class preparation, grading papers, and for a variety of other services. Assistants in Public History are often assigned to Archives. Assistantships may be renewed for a second year. Ordinarily, an assistant can complete requirements for a degree in two academic years. Most assistantships begin in the fall quarter, though some occasionally open up in Winter or Spring. Applicants for an assistantship for the fall should submit their application by no later than April 15 in order to assure consideration.

Course of Study

Thesis Plan Requirements
Students must meet all requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, show a reading knowledge of a foreign language when deemed necessary for thesis research as determined by their thesis advisor, and successfully defend a thesis. Students select two fields of concentration, totaling 40 credit hours. Each field of concentration will have a minimum of 16 hours of course work, with a minimum of two 700-level courses. A minimum of 20 hours must be 700-level course work, including the required HST 700 (Historical Methods). In addition, near the end of their studies, and after submitting a prospectus approved by the student's thesis committee, students will register for 4-12 hours of HST 799 (Thesis). HST 799 will conclude with a successful oral defense of the thesis before a panel of three professors, chaired by the thesis advisor. Students may petition the graduate studies committee to grant exceptions to field of concentration or 700-level course requirements
Possible fields of concentration are as follows:
1. United States to 1877
2. United States since 1877
3. Ancient World and Europe to 1600
4. Europe since 1600
5. Africa, Asia, and Latin America
History Courses Numbered 700-709 20 (minimum)
History Courses Numbered 600 20
History 799 Thesis 4-12
Total 52
Course Intensive Plan Requirements
Students must meet all requirements of the School of Graduate Studies. Students select two fields of concentration (see above), totaling 52 hours. There must be a minimum of 20 hours in each field of concentration; there should be a minimum of 12 hours of 700-level courses in each field of concentration as well as the required HST 700 (Historical Methods). Students must seek the consent of a graduate director before taking course work outside their fields of concentration. Students may petition the graduate studies committee to grant exceptions to field of concentration or 700-level course requirements. The student will submit a revised paper that incorporates primary sources, between 25 and 30 pages in length, in the final quarter of their studies as an exit project under this plan.
History Courses Numbered 700-709 28 (minimum)
History Courses Numbered 600 24
Total 52

Public History Plan Requirements
The Public History Plan Program at Wright State University integrates a traditional American history curriculum with courses taught by professionals in archives, museum studies, and historic preservation, an internship, and a project leading to a Master of Arts degree in history with a specialization in public history.
Required Academic Core Courses (24 credits)
Public historians are historians who apply their skills and knowledge outside of academic or classroom settings. Public history students are required to complete 24 hours of American history courses including at least 12 hours of seminar and 12 hours of 600-level courses in American history. Students completing a public history program must complete a course that introduces historical research methods (HST 700). Public history students will complete 56-58 credit hours.
Required Public History Courses 18
Public history students must complete the following core requirements:
HST 725 Introduction to Public History 4
HST 710 Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts 4
HST 712 Museum Administration and Collections 4
HST 715 Historical Management Internship 5
HST 720 Project 1
Advanced Public History Course Requirements 8
Students must complete eight credit hours in advanced Public History courses. Students may choose breadth over specialization by taking four credits each in Museum Studies and Archives and Records Management. Students will also have the option to specialize and take eight advanced credit hours in either Archives or Museum Studies.
HST 714 Advanced Problems in Archival Work 4
HST 730 Archival Records Technologies 2
HST 740 Information Management 2
HST 713 Museum Interpretation and Exhibits 4
HST 727 Topics in Public History: Decorative Arts 4
Electives 6-8
Students may select from additional public history or academic history courses including the following Public History electives. With the approval of the Public History Program director, students may take courses in an outside discipline such as art, anthropology, urban and geography, English, education, and business.
HST 711 Local History Research 2
HST 685 Historic Preservation 4
HST 727 Topics in Public History: Architectural History 4
HST 717 Practica: Archives and Museums 1-2
HST 688 History and New Media 4
Total 56-58

Certificate in Museum Studies or Archives and Records Management
Students admitted to selected graduate programs at Wright State University and students who have received a graduate degree in history or in selected disciplines may choose to complete a certificate in either museum studies or archives and records management. Students who have previously earned a graduate degree must be admitted to the School of Graduate Studies with nondegree status. Students wishing to pursue either certificate program must fill out a certificate application with the director of public history.
Required Courses for a Certificate in Museum Studies
HST 687 Introduction to Public History 4
HST 712 Museum Administration and Collections 4
HST 713 Museum Interpretation and Exhibits 4
HST 725 Topics in Public History: Decorative Arts 4
HST 715 Historical Management Internship 5
HST 720 Project 1
Total 22

Required Courses for a Certificate in Archives and Records Management
HST 687 Introduction to Public History 4
HST 711 Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts 4
HST 714 Advanced Problems in Archival Work 4
HST 730 Archival Records Technologies 2
HST 740 Information Management 2
HST 715 Historical Management Internship 5
HST 720 Project 1
Total 22


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