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2007
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Music

Introduction

The Department of Music offers three graduate degree programs, all accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. These include the Master of Music in Music Education, the Master of Music in Performance, and, in conjunction with the College of Liberal Arts Master of Humanities Program, the Master of Humanities with an emphasis in music.

The Master of Music in Music Education degree is a professionally oriented program. It is designed to serve music educators from primary to postsecondary levels. Though all courses are pertinent to terminal degree programs, they are equally valuable for students who plan to study at the doctoral level. A variety of program options allows students to design programs that suit their professional goals and take into account their backgrounds and experience.

The Department of Music offers three major options in program planning that lead to the Master of Music in Music Education degree. The options include the Thesis Option, the Project Option, and the Recital Option. Each contains requirements in music education, music history and literature, and music theory, as well as opportunities for performance. For the Thesis Option, the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of the thesis director; the Project Option requires one project under the supervision of a project director; and for the Recital Option, the student presents a full-length public recital and a research paper.

The Master of Music in Performance is a degree program designed to prepare graduates for professional careers as performing musicians and/or those who seek to pursue further study in music at the doctoral level. Areas of study include solo performance in the instrumental or vocal areas, and either instrumental or choral conducting. Each program of study includes requirements in music history, music research, and music theory, plus intensive study in the designated applied area. The required thesis comprises a public performance recital of approximately one hour's length, with an accompanying scholarly research document related to the recital. Requirements also include a one-year residency of three consecutive quarters of full-time enrollment, beginning in the Fall quarter (i.e., Fall-Winter-Spring quarters), and an oral comprehensive examination at the completion of the program.

The Master of Humanities degree is a flexible degree program within the College of Liberal Arts. The course of study may be designed to serve the needs of the student interested in pursuing a career in a variety of areas, including musicology, theory, composition, performance areas, and others. Courses are equally valuable for students who plan to study at the doctoral level. A variety of curricular options allows students to design programs that suit their professional goals and take into account their backgrounds and experience. Several options are available including a thesis, recital, or creative project.

Students interested in the Master of Humanities program should also consult that program entry in the catalog.

Admission

In addition to meeting the admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, applicants for admission to any of the three degree programs of the Graduate Studies in Music program (Master of Music in Music Education, Master of Music in Performance, or Master of Humanities with an emphasis in music) must present an undergraduate major in music from an accredited college or university with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in undergraduate course work in music. In addition to the application and transcripts sent to the School of Graduate Studies, the applicant must submit the following to the Department of Music: resume; three recommendations from teachers, administrators, or colleagues; and other supporting material the applicant may deem appropriate.

In addition to the requirements in the preceding paragraph, applicants for the Master of Music in Performance program must complete a successful performance audition in the intended emphasis (Choral Conducting, Instrumental Conducting, Instrumental Performance, Piano Performance, or Vocal Performance), which places the student at the equivalence of an undergraduate senior recital in the intended emphasis area. Additional materials (portfolio, letters of recommendation, repertoire lists, etc.) appropriate to the specific emphasis may be required in each emphasis by the appropriate program specialist and applied committee.

The applicant must also schedule an admissions interview with the director of Graduate Studies in Music prior to admission.

Upon admission, placement examinations in Music Theory and Music History must be taken no later than the third week of the first quarter of study and passed prior to enrollment in the applicable courses.

Students admitted to the Graduate Studies Program in Music will be classified as regular, conditional, probationary, or non-degree seeking, as defined in the WSU Graduate Catalog. Moreover, any changes in status will be in accordance with policies outlined in the Graduate Catalog. In addition to the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, removal of the conditional status requires achieving a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in the first 12 hours of academic study in the program. Only regularly organized academic classes at the 700 level may be included in this average. Applied music, ensembles, chamber music, workshops, and independent study of any type may not be counted in the 12 hours needed to remove conditional status.

Students who wish to apply to study applied music must audition for the appropriate Applied Music Board.

Students in the Master of Music in Music Education degree program who do not hold a standard teaching licensure at the time of admission will be required to earn Ohio licensure.

Exceptions may be made for reasonable cause; such exceptions may require action by the Department of Music Graduate Committee.

Advising

No student will take graduate work in music without departmental advising. Full- and part-time students enrolled in the program must consult with their advisors each quarter. Students who are not candidates for the degree must have departmental permission as outlined for the particular area of study.

Each regularly enrolled student will be assigned an advisor appointed by the director of Graduate Studies in Music. The advisor will be assigned according to the student’s program emphasis. Full- and part-time students enrolled in graduate courses must consult with their advisor each quarter. The advisor, the director of Graduate Studies in Music, and the student will plan the student’s program. The plan will be made and filed with the School of Graduate studies no later than mid-term of the second quarter of the student’s enrollment in the program.

The student will be assigned a committee of three faculty members who will design and evaluate the oral comprehensive examination.

The Department of Music publishes the Wright State University Graduate Studies in Music Handbook, which provides detailed information about all aspects of the graduate program in music. All graduate students in music should obtain a copy from the departmental office.

In addition to a Department of Music advisor, students in the Master of Humanities program will also be assigned an advisor in the Humanities Program of the College of Liberal Arts. Given the flexible nature of this degree program, it is essential that Master of Humanities students meet at the beginning of their program with both advisors. It is also critical that Master of Humanities students meet regularly (at least once per quarter) with their assigned advisors. In addition to policies and procedures outlined in the Department of Music Graduate Studies in Music Handbook, students in the Master of Humanities Program must also follow policies and procedures in the Master of Humanities Handbook provided by the Humanities Program. Students interested in the Master of Humanities program should also consult that program entry in this catalog.

Faculty

Professors
Leland D. Bland, music theory, music history and literature
Henry N. Dahlman (director), music education, music history and literature, choral conducting
Herbert Dregalla (chair), music education
Charles S. Larkowski, musicology, music history and literature, music theory

Associate Professors
David M. Booth, instrumental conducting, music education
Brenda Ellis, music education
Shelly M. Jagow, applied saxophone, music education \
Francis H. Laws, III, applied euphonium and trombone
Jackson Leung, musicology, music history and literature, applied piano
Sharon H. Nelson (associate dean, College of Liberal Arts), music education
Randall S. Paul, music education, applied clarinet/saxophone
James W. Tipps, music education
Kimberly J. Warrick, applied voice

Assistant Professors
In-Hong Cha, applied violin
Christopher L. Chaffee, applied flute
Drew Collins, music education, choral composition and arranging
Daniel Zehringer, trumpet

Faculty Associates
Lucy Firlie, applied viola
Deborah Netanel, applied cello, music theory
J. Ritter Werner, applied organ, music theory, music history

Course of Study

Master of Music in Music Education
Program of Study45

MUS 601, 602, 665, 704 15
Music Theory (600-700 level)6
Music History and Literature (600-700 level)6
Elective Courses in Music (600-700 level)12-18
Thesis, Recital, or Project Option*1-6

*For a culminating experience, the candidate may choose one of three options. These include a traditional thesis, a performance recital in the candidate's applied area with supporting written document, or a creative project. Further details are outlined below and in the Department of Music Graduate Studies in Music Handbook.

During the last quarter in the program, a candidate for a degree must pass an oral comprehensive examination covering the areas of music education, music history, and music theory. The student who elects the thesis option will also be prepared to defend the thesis. The examination will be designed and evaluated by the candidate's committee.

Thesis Option

Course work will be distributed in the areas of music education, music history and literature, music theory, performance (12 to 18 credit hours), and thesis (maximum of 6 credit hours), for a minimum total of 45 credit hours. Students will prepare a thesis under the supervision of a thesis director, who is approved by the director of Graduate Studies in Music. The thesis will be read and approved by the candidate's committee.

Recital Option

Course work will be distributed in the areas of music education (24 to 30 credit hours), music history and literature, music theory, and performance (15 to 21 credit hours), for a minimum total of 45 credit hours. If approved by the appropriate Applied Music Board for the recital option, the student will present a full-length public recital. The recital performance will be heard and judged on a pass-fail basis by the appropriate Applied Music Board. For specifications as to length, content, and procedures for the graduate recital, students should consult the departmental Applied Music Policy Statement, Section IX, "Graduate Study in Applied Music." This policy statement is available in the office of the Department of Music.

In addition, students will present a research paper related to the recital literature. The paper, equivalent in scope to a term paper, will be read and approved by a permanent member of the music history and literature or music theory faculty

Master's Project Option

Course work will be distributed in the areas of music education (24 to 30 credit hours), music history and literature, music theory, and performance (15 to 21 credit hours), for a minimum total of 45 credit hours. In addition, students will present a project. Students may revise, refine, and extend a paper written for a course, or may elect to present a new paper. The project paper will be read and approved by the student's project director and a second reader.

Note: In any of the options the student may, with the approval of the director of Graduate Studies in Music and the advisor, elect a maximum of two courses outside the Department of Music. The courses may be substituted for music electives if the student can show the courses are in cognate areas that contribute substantially to the preparation of a teacher in the arts.

Master of Music in Performance
Program of Study48

MUS 6014
Music Theory (600-700 level)6
Music History and Literature (600-700 level) 6
Other Courses in Music (600-700 level)6-9
Applied Study in Area of Specialization*(700 level)12
Performance Requirement (Ensemble)**3-6
Approved Electives (600-700 level) 2-6
Thesis (MUS 799)3

*Choral Conducting, Instrumental Conducting, Instrumental Performance, Piano Performance, or Vocal Performance.

**Ensemble related to area of specialization, assigned by program advisor.

Thesis

The thesis is comprised of a full-length public performance recital in the area of specialization and an accompanying scholarly research paper related to the recital literature. The recital will be heard and judged on a pass-fail basis by the appropriate Applied Music Board. For specifications as to length, content, and procedures for the graduate recital, students should consult the departmental Applied Music Policy Statement, Section IX, "Graduate Study in Applied Music," available in the Department of Music office.

In addition, students will present a scholarly research paper related to the recital literature. The paper will be read and approved by a permanent member of the music history and literature or music theory faculty.

During the last quarter in the program, a candidate for a degree must pass an oral comprehensive examination covering the areas of the applied performance specialization, music history, and music theory.

Further details are outlined in the Department of Music Graduate Studies in Music Handbook, which may be found at www.wright.edu/music/grad/handbook/.

Master of Humanities with an Emphasis in Music

All students in the Master of Humanities program may take advantage of the resources of the Department of Music. Students with a primary interest in music may design a specialized program of study in consultation with the director of Graduate Studies in Music and the director of the Humanities Program. Students choosing to concentrate in music are required to follow the general parameters of the Master of Humanities degree; within these parameters they may design a program of study with a focus in music history, theory, composition, performance, or other musical specialty.

Program of Study48

HUM 700 and 7208
HUM 710 or MUS 6014
Music Theory (600-700 level)6
Music History and Literature (600-700 level)6
Other Studies in Music (600-700 level)8
Electives8
Project (HUM 730)8

The culminating project may be either a traditional thesis or a creative project. This project must follow the same general guidelines required of all Humanities projects. As a third option, students concentrating in music may give a recital as their culminating project. Those choosing the recital option must follow the guidelines specified by the Department of Music. Further details are outlined below, in the Department of Music Graduate Studies in Music Handbook, and in the Master of Humanities Handbook.

During the last quarter in the program, a candidate for a degree must pass an oral comprehensive examination covering the areas of music history, music theory, and the student's area of musical emphasis. The student who elects the thesis option will also be prepared to defend the thesis. The examination will be designed and evaluated by the candidate's committee.

A student handbook detailing the policies and requirements of the Master of Humanities degree with an emphasis in music is available in both the Department of Music and the Humanities Office.

Thesis Option

Course work will be distributed in the areas of music theory, music history and literature, research in music, the humanities, performance, and thesis (maximum of eight credit hours) for a minimum total of 48 credit hours. Students will prepare a thesis under the supervision of a thesis director, who is approved by the director of Graduate Studies in Music and the director of the Humanities program. The thesis will be read and approved by the candidate's committee.

Recital Option

Course work will be distributed in the areas of music theory, music history and literature, research in music, the humanities, and performance for a minimum total of 40 credit hours. In the case of the recital option, the final recital and paper described below fulfills the thesis requirement (maximum of eight credit hours) of the Master of Humanities curriculum.

If approved by the appropriate Applied Music Board for the recital option, the student will present a full-length public recital. The recital performance will be heard and judged on a pass-fail basis by the appropriate Applied Music Board. For specifications as to length, content, and procedures for the graduate recital, students should consult the Music Department's Applied Music Policy Statement, Section IX, "Graduate Study in Applied Music." This policy statement is available in the office of the Department of Music.

In addition, students will present a research paper related to the recital literature. The paper, equivalent in scope to a term paper, will be read and approved by a permanent member of the music history and literature or music theory faculty. Master's Project Option

Course work will be distributed in the areas of music theory, music history and literature, research in music, the humanities, and performance for a minimum total of 40 credit hours. In the case of the master's project option, the final project described below fulfills the thesis requirement (maximum of eight credit hours) of the Master of Humanities curriculum.

For the project, students may revise, refine, and extend research done during the course of study or may elect to present a new paper. Projects may also be approved in creative activity such as musical composition, conducting, and other areas. In such cases the student will present a research paper related to the project. The paper, equivalent in scope to a term paper, will be read and approved by the student's committee, including one full-time member of the music faculty.

Students Not Enrolled in the M.Mus. Program

A graduate student enrolled in another degree program (e.g., Master of Arts, Master of Humanities, or Master of Education) or a nondegree graduate student may, with the approval of his or her department, elect certain graduate courses in music. The requirements for courses in each area of music are listed below.

Music Education

All courses in music education require an undergraduate degree in music. Permission of the director of Graduate Studies in Music and permission of the instructor are required.

Theory of Music, Music History and Literature

All courses in music theory, and music history and literature require a substantial background in music. Permission of the director of Graduate Studies in Music and permission of the instructor are required.

Performance

Ensembles require an audition and approval of the instructor. Private study in any area of applied music requires a successful audition before the appropriate Applied Music Board.

For further information, consult the departmental Applied Music Policy Statement, Section IX, "Graduate Study in Applied Music." This policy statement is available in the office of the Department of Music.


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