Wright State University
2006
2004-2006 Graduate Catalog
Table of Concents
about wsu
Resources








 
 

Graduate Programs

Back to Program List | Program Website

Education and Human Services—General

Introduction

The College of Education and Human Services offers programs leading to graduate degrees in the following areas: educational leadership, with programs in curriculum and supervision (M.A., M.Ed., Ed.S.) and school administration (M.A., M.Ed., Ed.S.); teacher leader (M.Ed.); the M.A., M.Ed. in student affairs in higher education, educational technology, library media, and Ed.S. in adult and higher education; human services with programs in counseling (M.A., M.S.), rehabilitation counseling (M.R.C.), and student personnel services (M.A., M.Ed.); and teacher education, with a classroom teacher program (M.A., M.Ed.) that includes a variety of concentrations and specialized areas in K–12 such as art, physical education, reading, and special education/intervention specialist. Concentrations in these programs are listed in the Graduate Degrees, Programs, and Credit section and are described in detail in the following pages.

In order to accommodate increased academic requirements by the state of Ohio, Wright State offers graduate initial licensure programs for Middle Childhood, Adolescent to Young Adult, and Multi-Age which lead to Master’s of Education (M.Ed.) degree. Wright State also offers a post-master’s degree program leading to the educational specialist (Ed.S.) degree.

Admission

In addition to meeting requirements for admission established by the School of Graduate Studies (these requirements can be reviewed at this Web site http://www.wright.edu/academics/catalog/grad/admissions/), candidates for these degrees who do not meet the minimum cumulative GPA requirement to waive the GRE or MAT, must submit satisfactory Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) scores, unless otherwise noted (see Admission Standards). The Adolescent Young Adult, Multi-Age, and Middle Childhood initial teacher licensure programs require passing scores on the state of Ohio’s mandated Praxis II Specialty (Content) Area Exam(s). Contact the college’s Office of Student Services or visit their Web site at www.cehs.wright.edu/ss/ to learn more about the Praxis II exams.

All students considering graduate-level courses in education and human services should do so with the understanding that graduate study differs in quality from undergraduate study. Graduate study requires that students be increasingly self-directed. Students are not guaranteed a master’s degree by attending and completing courses. Exit requirements must be met in all programs.

Admission to the College of Education and Human Services is based on the candidate’s written statement of purpose, consideration of undergraduate and/or graduate cumulative grade point average, submission of satisfactory scores on either the MAT, GRE, or other required examination, and in some cases, letters of reference and a personal interview (see Admission Standards).

Technology Policy
For admission to the college, all College of Education and Human Services students, graduate and undergraduate, part-time and full-time, will be expected to certify that they own or have access to a computer and the Internet.

In order to meet the mission of the college “…to prepare professionals to meet the educational and human services needs of a diverse, democratic society,” it is necessary for our students to play an active role in the technological environment the college and Wright State University are creating to assist in the completion of this mission. An increasing number of classes and options will become available to students using a variety of distributed learning formats; library resources are available in a growing number of full-text formats, and global connections via telecommunications will be part of daily operations. Students preparing to become professionals in education and human service areas must demonstrate appropriate and effective skills and knowledge in technological aspects of their work.

Currently, minimum equipment requirements recommended by Wright State University’s Computing and Telecommunications Services (CaTS) are Macintosh: G4 800mHz or greater, RAM: 512 mb, or Windows PC: 1gHz or greater; MacOS X 10.4 or Windows XP. Please check the following Web Site http://www.wright.edu/cats/purchase/pcguidelines.html for current information about minimum equipment requirements.

The college supports Macintosh computers in faculty and staff offices and maintains a computer lab. Wright State University has purchased a site license for most Microsoft software (see the Web page for Wright State’s Computing and Telecommunications Services, http://www.wright.edu/cats/ for details).

Accreditations
The College of Education and Human Services meets the standards of, and has been approved by, the Ohio State Board of Education and is a member of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. The college's teacher education programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The college's community counseling, community mental health counseling, and school counseling programs are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), and the Rehabilitation Counseling programs carry the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accreditation.

Initial Teaching Credential
Students seeking to enroll in a Teacher Education program designed to deliver an initial teaching credential (license) are required to pass the Praxis II specialty/content area exam(s) as defined by current state of Ohio standards. Candidates to these programs must contact the college’s Office of Student Services for assistance in identifying the appropriate exam(s) for his/her desired teaching field. Students unable to achieve a passing score as defined by state of Ohio standards will not be admitted to a Teacher Education program. Students seeking to enroll in a Teacher Education program designed to deliver an initial teaching credential will not be required to take the GRE or MAT exams. An exception to this rule is the Intervention Specialist programs. Applicants to these programs must take the GRE or MAT exams, unless eligible to waive testing requirement based on cumulative GPA (see Admission Standards).

Admission Standards
Admission into regular status requires an overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 (based on a 4.0 grading system) or an overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.5, but with a 3.0 or better for the last 90 quarter hours (60 semester hours) earned toward the undergraduate degree. Admission into this status also requires approval by a degree program.

Candidates with a grade point average of less than 2.3 on a 4.0 grading system are not ordinarily admitted to graduate school. A petition process is available to formally request admissions not having met an admission standard. Candidates for admission to the Department of Human Services must meet additional requirements, which include three letters of reference, a personal interview, and a writing sample. Candidates for admission to certain programs in the Departments of Educational Leadership and Teacher Education must meet additional requirements, which include letters of reference, a personal interview, a writing sample, a self-assessment instrument, and Praxis II specialty area exams.

Waiver of GRE/MAT
Candidates to Educational Leadership master’s degree programs, Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (HPR) programs, and select Teacher Education programs (including special education/intervention specialist) may not be required to submit passing GRE or MAT scores if their cumulative undergraduate GPA is a 3.0 or higher (graduate level GPA must be 3.0 or higher.) Candidates to Teacher Education programs requiring a passing score on a PRAXIS II specialty area exam(s) must submit passing Praxis scores regardless of undergraduate GPA.

Candidates to Human Services programs may not be required to submit passing GRE or MAT scores if their cumulative undergraduate GPA is a 3.3 or higher.

Provisional
Under certain conditions, a student may be admitted provisionally (for one quarter only), pending receipt of credentials. If admission requirements are not met during the quarter in which a student was admitted provisionally, registration for future quarters will be denied and the student will lose graduate credit for any graduate courses completed during the quarter.

Conditional
Students who have an undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 or better, or who have an average between 2.3 and 2.5 with 2.7 or better in the last half of undergraduate work, may be granted conditional admission.

Regular admission to the College of Education and Human Services is granted after successful completion of 12 hours of course work with a grade of B or better in each course.

Teaching Licensure Candidate
Students who wish to complete licensure requirements at the graduate level but do not wish to pursue a graduate degree may be admitted as licensure candidates with the permission of the department in which the programs are housed. Persons pursuing a teacher licensure program are required to complete the Ohio Department of Education prescribed Praxis II exams for their intended area(s) of licensure.

Nondegree Status
Persons who have a bachelor’s degree may enroll in nondegree status for graduate courses without being admitted to a graduate program. If you are accepted into degree status at a later date, a maximum of one half (50 percent) of th graduate hours required for completion of degree requirements may consist of applicable graduate courses completed in nondegree status. The exception is that the Department of Human Services, allows only 12 hours of nondegree credit to be applied to one of its degree programs.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in education may be obtained in almost all of the programs offered by the College of Education and Human Services. The M.A. degree requires a minimum of 45 credit hours including a thesis. A maximum of nine hours of thesis credit will be counted toward the M.A. degree. The M.A. degree requires a thesis with a minimum of 45 credit hours, including a maximum of nine hours of thesis credit. An oral defense is required for students writing a thesis. The examining committee will consist of three members of the graduate faculty selected by the student and advisor.

Each graduate student will be assigned an advisor upon admission as a degree student. The student is required to consult with the advisor to plan the program of study during the first quarter of graduate study and to review the procedure for admission to candidacy.

Master of Education

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree may be obtained by completing one of two patterns: (a) a minimum of 45 credit hours of course work, (b) a minimum of 40 credit hours of course work, plus five credit hours of a research project.

Each graduate degree student will be assigned an advisor upon admission to the college. The student is required to consult with the advisor to plan the program of study during the first quarter of graduate study and to review the procedure for admission to candidacy.

A program of concurrent degree and licensure work typically will require more course work than the standard master’s degree program, and may require the individual to take undergraduate courses. These undergraduate courses apply to licensure requirements, but do not apply as graduate credit toward a master’s degree.

An exit requirement must be successfully completed at the end of the program of study in all CEHS departments.

Master of Science

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree in counseling offers concentrations in five specialties: *mental health counseling, c*ommunity counseling, business and industrial management counseling, marriage and family counseling, and counseling exceptional children. The M.Ed. in *school counseling is also offered.

*Note:These three programs are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Program (CACREP). These programs require the completion of a practicum and/or internship.

Admission requirements include a completed graduate application submitted to the School of Graduate Studies. In addition to the application, candidates must also submit a writing sample and three letters of recommendation, and participate in a group interview. The Master of Science degree may be obtained by completing all requirements outlined in the student’s program of study. The program of study is the student’s contract with the School of Graduate Studies (SGS), which outlines required courses and electives, department and SGS academic standards, and any modifications agreed on by the student’s academic faculty advisor.

Each graduate degree student will be assigned an advisor upon admission to the college. The student is required to consult with the advisor to plan the program of study during the first quarter of graduate study and to review the procedure for candidacy.

Successful completion of a written departmental comprehensive examination is required at the end of each program of study.

Master of Rehabilitation Counseling

The Master of Rehabilitation Counseling (M.R.C.) program offers training and course work designed to develop skills in the holistic counseling process. The program prepares students for work within a wide variety of settings, and students may choose to specialize in either the rehabilitation of persons with severe disabilities or the rehabilitation of individuals who are chemically dependent. M.R.C. students must successfully complete a 600-hour internship. These programs are accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).

Each graduate degree student will be assigned an advisor upon admission as a degree student. The student is required to consult with the advisor to plan the program of study during the first quarter of graduate study and to review the procedure for admission to candidacy.

Successful completion of a written departmental comprehensive examination is required at the end of the degree program.

Educational Specialist

The Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) program is an advanced (post-master’s) degree program in educational leadership for individuals who have career interests in higher education, administration, and adult continuing education. Successful thesis defense constitutes the comprehensive examination for this degree.

Final Evaluation for Programs

For students in the M.A. programs, the oral defense of the thesis constitutes the major emphasis of the final evaluation. The examining committee will consist of three members of the graduate faculty selected with the student’s advisor.

Students in the M.Ed., M.S., M.R.C., and M.A. programs must successfully complete a departmental comprehensive exit requirement. Should the student fail to pass the final comprehensive requirement, the student and advisor will plan a remedial program of study in preparation for reevaluation. Such a program could include independent study, further course work, or both. As a result, the quarter hour requirements for the degree may also be increased. Students may retake the comprehensive exit requirement a maximum of three times.

Thesis and/or Project Procedures
(for M.A. Candidates)

Students planning to write a thesis or do a research project in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master’s degree should do the following:

1. Upon completion of EDL 751, EDL 852 and EDL 988 (consult with your advisor), register for one of the following to receive thesis credit:
ED 899 1–9 hours or
EDT 899 1-9 hours or
EDL 999 1–9 hours.
2. Prepare a preliminary thesis or project proposal following the college or departmental outline for proposals. This proposal is to be developed with the assistance of the faculty advisor.
3. Establish a thesis or project committee. It is customary, although not required, for a student’s advisor to be a member of the committee. The remainder of the committee may include persons in the College of Education and Human Services or other disciplines and should be chosen as resource persons relative to the research. The function of the committee is to facilitate the student’s progress toward completing the proposal, conducting the study, and preparing the final report or thesis. Further, the committee serves as the primary source of evaluation of the student’s oral defense.
4. Upon completion of the oral defense, submit an electronic copy of the final project or thesis to the School of Graduate Studies. The outline for thesis and project proposals may be obtained from the college’s Office of Student Services. The Graduate Thesis/Dissertation Handbook may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies.

Faculty

Professors
Gregory R. Bernhardt (dean), education, counselor education
Donna Cole, teacher education
Colleen Finegan, early childhood education, intervention specialist
Diane E. Frey, counselor education
G. William Gayle, health and physical education
T. Stevenson Hansell, reading, language arts
Jan La Forge, rehabilitation counseling
Ron Helms, teacher education
Bonnie K. Mathies, educational technology
Charles W. Ryan, educational leadership, counselor education

Associate Professors
Beth Basista, science education/physics
Angela Beumer-Johnson, English education
Thomas Diamantes, educational leadership
Stephen B. Fortson, counselor education
Stephen D. Frederick, health and physical education
Scott Graham, educational leadership/organizational leadership
Charlotte Harris, teacher education
Phyllis A. Henderson, counselor education
Mary Ann Jones, counselor education
Burga Jung, teacher education
Jill Lindsey, educational leadership
Susann Mathews, mathematics education
Richelle O’Connor, teacher education
June A. Ovington, educational leadership
D. Drew Pringle, health and physical education
Timothy Rafferty, educational leadership
Linda Ramey, teacher education
Patricia R. Renick, intervention specialist
Doug Roby, educational leadership
William Slattery, science education/geology
James Tomlin, science education/biology
Carol Wagner Williams, rehabilitation counseling
Richard A. Wantz, counselor education

Assistant Professors
Kathy Adams, educational leadership
Mary Ellen Bargerhuff, intervention specialist
Freida Bennett, educational leadership/organizational leadership
Jacqueline Collier, literacy education
Roger Carlsen, educational leadership
Stephanie Davis, educational leadership/workforce education
James Dunne, intervention specialist
Rochelle Garner, educational leadership/organizational leadership
Grant Hambright, educational leadership
Deborah Hess, early childhood education
Doris Johnson, teacher education
Joseph Keferl, rehabilitation counseling
Marietta Langlois, health education
Will Mosier, early childhood education
Joanne Risacher, educational leader/student affairs in higher education
Tracy Rusch, mathematics education
Ken Schatmeyer, literacy education
Eileen F. Self, counselor education
Donna Tromski-Klingshirn, counselor education

Lecturers
Rebekah Bower, athletic training
Glenn Graham, educational leadership
Donna Hanby, gifted education
Catherine Keener, intervention specialist
Greta Knigga, american sign language
Marguerite Veres, educational leadership
Tony Ortiz, athletic training

Program Description


The programs within educational leadership are designed primarily for those who want to prepare for leadership roles in educational settings. All of the programs lead to licensure except the Teacher Leader Program. Completion of a professional, reflective portfolio is the exit requirement for all graduate programs in this department. The programs are:

Educational Administrative Specialist: Curriculum, Instruction, and Professional Development (This program is currently not accepting new students). This master’s degree program leads to licensure in the state of Ohio in this area.

Principalship. (Ages 3–14 and Ages 8–21). The Principalship master’s degree program leads to the Educational Administrative Specialists Principal Licensure. This master’s degree program leads to principal licensure in the state of Ohio in the same level (elementary, middle, or secondary) as the individual’s teaching certificate or license. Initial licensure requires 68 quarter hours of course work and two years of teaching experience under a valid teaching certificate
or license.

Educational Administrative Specialist: Superintendent (This program is being realigned to meet national standards). This program leads to licensure as Superintendent in the state of Ohio. Initial licensure requires 84 quarter hours of course work and three years of administrative experience under a valid administrative license.

Educational Administrative Specialist: Curriculum, Instruction, and Professional Development: Technology (This program is currently not accepting new students). This program leads to licensure in the state of Ohio in this area. Initial licensure requires two years of teaching experience under a valid teaching certificate or license. This program is designed for individuals wishing to perform in a district-level leadership role in technology.

Curriculum & Instruction Teacher Leader. This master’s degree program is designed primarily for teachers who wish to remain in the classroom and combine an instructional improvement focus with leadership and curriculum development skills. The program is offered off campus to cohort groups. Forty-eight quarter hours are required for the M.Ed. Successful completion of a professional portfolio is also required. This program may be used as a basis for further work in educational leadership.

Student Affairs in Higher Education–Administration. This master’s degree program was developed to provide education and training for individuals interested in careers in student services. The emphasis of this program is student affairs and development from an administrative perspective.

Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) in Educational Leadership. This program is an advanced degree program for individuals who have career interests in school administration, higher education, and adult development. It leads to the Educational Specialist degree. A planned program of study requires a minimum of 45 quarter hours of graduate work beyond the master’s degree. The Ed.S. degree is an intermediate degree between the M.Ed. and the Ph.D. degree.

Classroom Teacher: Library Media. This program leads to the Multi-Age License in library media for teachers who wish to work in Pre-K–12 school library media centers.

Classroom Teacher: Computer/Technology Education. This program leads to a computer/technology endorsement that can be added to a teaching credential. It is designed for teachers who wish to focus on current and emerging technologies for instruction.

Graduate School
E344 Student Union
Voice: (937) 775-2976
Fax: (937) 775-2453
E-mail: wsugrad@wright.edu