Frequently Asked Questions

Air Force ROTC is very different from the stereotype of a military recruitment and training program. This page is dedicated to answering many of the questions potential applicants, and their parents, have about the program as well as attempting to dispel the misconceptions the general public has about the program.

1. How do I visit Detachment 643?
2. How do I enroll/register in AFROTC?
3. I'm not a Wright State University student; can I enroll in the AFROTC program?
4. What does it mean to be "on contract" in Air Force ROTC?
5. Am I committed to the government once I join?
6. If I enroll and don't like ROTC, can I quit?
7. Do I have to be on scholarship to enter AFROTC?
8. Can I apply for a scholarship after I join Air Force ROTC?
9. What is the difference between AFROTC and enlisting in the Air Force?
10. Do I have to wear a uniform?
11. What is my weekly time commitment in AFROTC?
12. What summer programs and travel opportunities are available in Air Force ROTC?
13. Can I participate in intercollegiate athletics while a member of the Air Force ROTC program?
14. What is Leadership Laboratory (LLAB)?
15. How much physical training do I do as an AFROTC cadet?
16. Are there special Air Force ROTC activities during the school year?
17. What is Field Training, when and how often must I attend it?
18. How long is my commitment to the Air Force after graduation and commission?
19. What are the benefits of being an Air Force Officer?
20. I want to be a pilot or a navigator. How can I become one?
21. Do I need perfect 20/20 vision to fly in the Air Force?
22. Can I continue my education beyond the baccalaureate level before entering active duty?
23. Can I pursue graduate education after I'm commissioned and on active duty?


1. How do I visit Detachment 643?

Before you visit Detachment 643, please give us a call so that we know you are coming and we can plan to meet you. You can contact us at (937) 775-2730. For directions to the detachment, our directions page.


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2. How do I enroll/register in AFROTC?

If you plan on enrolling in AFROTC, please call our Recruiting Flight Commander at (937) 775-2730. In addition, most Dayton-area universities have AFROTC course listings in their course bulletin. You register for AFROTC like you would any other college course. However, please call us so we can ensure you are registering for the correct AFROTC section.

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3. I'm not a Wright State University student; can I enroll in the AFROTC program?

Yes, Detachment 643 has agreements with 14 local Dayton universities allowing you to pursue and complete academic opportunities available at your school while simultaneously enrolled in AFROTC at Det 643. You can usually register for AFROTC through your own university just as you would for any other course.

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4. What does it mean to be "on contract" in Air Force ROTC?

Being on "contract" means that you have signed a contract with the U.S. Government either for a scholarship (as a freshman or sophomore) or have successfully completed Field Training (as a junior or senior). Once you sign the contract, if you do not maintain AFROTC standards (i.e. military, academic, etc.) you can be subject to disenrollment from the program and related consequences.


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5. Am I committed to the government once I join?

You can leave AFROTC at any time. However, if you are on contract, you could be subject to disenrollment, recoupment of monies paid, and/or be called to extended-active duty.

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6. If I enroll and don't like ROTC, can I quit?

You can leave AFROTC at any time. However, if you are on contract, you could be subject to disenrollment, recoupment of monies paid, and/or be called to extended-active duty.

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7. Do I have to be on scholarship to enter AFROTC?

No. In fact, many students do not start with a scholarship but earn one eventually. Still, at any given time about 80% of AFROTC students country-wide receive financial assistance.


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8. Can I apply for a scholarship after I join Air Force ROTC?

Although you do not need a scholarship to join the AFROTC program, two-, three- and three-and-a-half year scholarships are available to qualified undergraduate and graduate students who join the Air Force ROTC program. Scholarships pay up to $18,000/year towards tuition, plus $900 for books/year and a tax-free monthly allowance that ranges from $300-500/month during the academic year. Contact your local detachment for more information on scholarships.



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9. What is the difference between AFROTC and enlisting in the Air Force?

AFROTC produces officers for the United States Air Force. To be an officer you must have a bachelor's degree and graduate from an officer commissioning program. An officer fills the management positions in the Air Force, and their salary reflects this. In addition, you must be an officer to be a Pilot or Combat Systems Officer. Enlisted members must have a high school diploma or GED equivalent and attend basic military training (i.e. boot camp). Enlisted members are technically trained and fill technical hands-on positions. Officers lead and manage the enlisted positions.

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10. Do I have to wear a uniform?

Yes. All first term cadets will be required to pass the USAF Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) prior to receiving the USAF Physical Training Uniform. Until the USAF PT uniform can be worn, cadets will wear conservative shorts or sports pands in a solid black or blue color. Shirt will be a solid black or gray without designm logos, printing or markings of any kind.

AS100 or AS250 cadets will receive their remaining uniform items in January of hte current academic year. Until a cadet receives his or her reamining uniform items, the dress attire for class will be business casual. Males will wear a collared shirt with slacks. Femailes will wear a conservative blouse with slacks or skirt not higher than the top of the knee.

You will be issued a complete uniform, at no cost to you. You are responsible for keeping the uniform clean and presentable. Normally, you are required to wear your uniform all day on Wednesdays, at Leadership Laboratory, and to your Aerospace Studies class. There are also certain social events scheduled throughout the year, such as Dining-Out, where the wear of the uniform is required.


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11. What is my weekly time commitment in AFROTC?

Your weekly time commitment depends on your cadet rank, cadet position, and optional extracurricular involvement. However, on average Freshman/Sophomores devote 5-6 hours a week, while Juniors/Seniors devote 8-9 hours a week to AFROTC, which include time in your ROTC class.

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12. What summer programs and travel opportunities are available in Air Force ROTC?

You have the option to compete for many of the exciting optional summer training programs AFROTC offers. You can shadow a junior officer in a career field of your interest, attend a Foreign Language Immersion in several countries throughout the world, complete Army Airborne Training, or experience Combat Survival School. Also, you can return to field training as a cadet training assistant, work at NASA as a research assistant, visit the Pentagon to see how the Air Force operates, or even go to England under the Royal Air Force's British Exchange Program. Whichever activity you choose, the Air Force provides your transportation, meals, lodging, and a daily expense allowance.

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13. Can I participate in intercollegiate athletics while a member of the Air Force ROTC program?

Yes, we highly encourage participation in your school's activities outside of AFROTC.


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14. What is Leadership Laboratory (LLAB)?

LLAB is a cadet organized and run lab taken each year with your AFROTC classes. You will spend two hours each week using the leadership and followership skills and management theory acquired in class. You also have the opportunity to take orientation flights, listen to military speakers, visit Air Force bases, view films and take part in social functions.

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15. How much physical training do I do as an AFROTC cadet?

You are required to participate in at least two one-hour sessions of Physical Training each week. These sessions are cadet-led, and are intended to help you maintain excellent physical condition and pass the required AFROTC Physical Fitness Assessment. Some flexibility in scheduling exists for distant cross-town school students.

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16. Are there special Air Force ROTC activities during the school year?

Throughout the year, activities take place to help students learn more about the Air Force and to have fun. These activities may include a visit to an active-duty Air Force base, aircraft orientation rides, paint ball, rock climbing, a Dining Out (a formal ball, rich in Air Force tradition), and many more. Some are optional and some mandatory, but all activities are scheduled well in advance to help you schedule your time.


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17. What is Field Training, when and how often must I attend it?

Field Training is an intensive, four-week long program you attend the summer after your second year (typically between your sophomore and junior year) which gives you a first-hand look at the active-duty Air Force and develops your military leadership and discipline. You will participate in sport competitions, junior officer education, marksmanship, survival skills, and physical fitness training. When you finish, you will be ready to return to your school and assume a leadership position within AFROTC. You only attend Field Training once as a cadet.

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18. How long is my commitment to the Air Force after graduation and commission?

You commitment depends on your career field. Most officers have a four-year commitment. However, pilots incur a ten-year commitment after completing pilot training, and navigators incur six years after training. Air Battle Managers have a six-year commitment.

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19. What are the benefits of being an Air Force Officer?

While there are many benefits, here are a few highlighted benefits:

1) Starting salary of around $40K, increasing to over $64K in four years (take-home pay varies depending on location and dependent status)
2) 30 days paid vacation each year
3) Free medical and dental care
4) $400,000 low-cost life insurance
5) Up to 100% of postgraduate tuition paid
6) Worldwide travel opportunities
7) Full retirement benefits after 20 years of service


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20. I want to be a pilot or a Combat Systems Officer, how can I become one?

First, you can major in ANY academic major and qualify as a pilot or Combat Systems Officer. However, to compete for a pilot or Combat Systems Officer position, you should have a competitive grade point average, be in excellent physical condition, and score well on the AFOQT. To compete for the pilot or Combat Systems Officer categories, you must be able to complete your bachelor's degree and be commissioned before you are 29 years old.

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21. Do I need perfect 20/20 vision to fly in the Air Force?

Not usually, but vision requirements change every year based on number of applicants, available slots, etc. Call Det 643 at (937) 775-2730 for any specific qualification questions and for updated vision requirements.

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22. Can I continue my education beyond the baccalaureate level before entering active duty?

Yes. The Air Force offers several opportunities to do so. In many cases you can request an educational delay. This delay between the time of commissioning and reporting for active duty will be of sufficient length to allow you to fulfill the requirements for a professional or master's degree. You will normally assume all financial obligations.


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23. Can I pursue graduate education after I'm commissioned and on active duty?

The Air Force is education-oriented and financially supports graduate studies. You can apply for the Air Force Institute of Technology to earn an advanced, medical, or law degree on full scholarship. Additionally, most bases have graduate college programs, and you may apply for the tuition assistance program that pays up to 100 percent of the tuition cost.

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