Not all courses described here are offered every quarter or every year. For a more detailed listing of prerequisites, enrollment restrictions, and specific courses offered in a particular quarter, consult the Wright State class schedule published each fall, winter, spring, and summer.

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Nursing/NUR

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information. All of the following courses require admission to the College of Nursing and Health. Course levels must be taken in sequence.

114-2 Nursing Elective

Special topics.

209-4 Introduction to Professional Nursing

Explores history of nursing, its response to society, and evolution of contemporary nursing. Empha-sizes past, present, and future roles based on selected concepts, models, and theories within the health care systems.

210-2 Introduction to Nursing Informatics

Introduction to trends and issues of informatics in nursing and health care with an emphasis on effective use of hardware and software in information technology. Laboratory experience included.

212-3 Nursing for Health and Wellness Lifestyle

Emphasizes concepts, models, theories, and methodologies consistent with a philosophy of health and wellness. Incorporates self-directed activities to promote maximum health in self and others. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 209.

213-3 Field Experience in Health and Wellness

Explores the impact of cultural, ethical, legal, political, and socioeconomic issues relating to wellness across the lifespan. Promotes the RN student's philosophy of well-being through self-directed field experiences. Prerequisite: NUR 308. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 212.

214-2 Human Diversity in Health Care

Examination of human diversity in relation to health/well-being and health care delivery systems. Both global and future orientations of diversity will be considered. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 209.

217-5 Health Assessment Across the Lifespan

Includes development of a systematic approach to obtaining a health history and appraisal, per-forming physical assessments on individuals throughout the lifespan. Focuses on the well individual in a variety of life settings Prerequisite: NUR 212, 214, ANT 202, P & B 301. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 210 .

218-5 Introduction to Clinical Nursing

Focuses on skills and related concepts basic to clinical practice. Integrates health assessment skills into nursing care and development of nursing diagnosis. Communication for documentation of data base is stressed. Prerequisite: NUR 217, P&B 302, BMB 250. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 306.

304-3 Foundations of Nursing Research

Introduces the basic elements of the research process. Emphasizes the critique and application of research findings to professional nursing practice. Prerequisite: NUR 218, STT 160 or equivalent.

305-3 Legal and Ethical Foundations for Nursing Practice

Examines the theoretical basis of ethical decision making and legal elements of professional nursing practice. Prepares the student for clinical application experience in succeeding courses.

306-3 Concepts of Altered Health States

Focuses on the relationship of normal body functioning and the physiological changes that occur as a result of illness including the body's compensatory mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on alterations in body function and system/organ failure. Prerequisite: ANT 202, P&B 302 or RN status, CHM 102, or equivalent.

307-3 Foundations of Family and Group Nursing

Foundational course in family development from the perspective of family nursing science. Explores impact of environmental influences on family health. Theoretical frameworks guiding the study and practice of group work will be examined. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 218.

308-5 Theories and Concepts of Professional Nursing

Introductory course oriented toward the continued socialization of the professional nurse with synthesis of concepts, theories, processes, and models to facilitate transition into professional nursing. For registered nurses only.

312-10, 313-10 Nursing Process: Human Existence and Health II, III

Clinical nursing courses. Focus on the nursing process and the human ability to adapt to one's environment in relation to an optimum state of health. Learning experiences include a variety of settings within and outside the health-care system. Prerequisite: for 313, NUR 312.

317-2 to 4 Selected Topics

Topics vary.

321-6 Adult Health and Illness

A clinical course which focuses on adults across the lifespan with altered health states. Emphasis is on providing secondary preventive care in a variety of settings. Prerequisite: NUR 218, PHR 340, NUR 307. Pre- or corequisite: PSY 341.

322-6 Nursing Care of Childbearing Families

A clinical course focusing on the understanding and application of selected concepts related to the childbearing family in the maternity cycle. Prerequisite: NUR 321, 304. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 305.

323-6 Nursing Care of Childrearing Families

A clinical course focusing on children and adolescents in families with a variety of health states in various health care settings. Prerequisite: NUR 321, 304. Pre- or corequisite: NUR 305.

324-6 Nursing Care of Aging/Aged Families

Examines theories, trends, and research in gerontological nursing. Examines the aging self, holistic health and independent function, hospitalization, and nursing management of illness in the aged. Explores advocacy for vulnerable aged. Prerequisite: NUR 307. Pre- or corequisite: 321.

405-3 Theory of Aging/Aged Families

Examines theories, trends, and research in gerontological nursing. Examines the healthy aged, holistic health and independent function, hospitalization and nursing management of illness in the aged. Explores advocacy for vulnerable aged. Prerequisite: NUR 210, 214, 304, 307, 308, 318. For RNs only.

406-2 to 3 Contemporary Nursing Issues and Health Policy

Examines global aspects of the social, political, legal, ethical, and environmental issues influencing health care, health policy, and advancement of the nursing profession. Professional issues confronting contemporary nursing are emphasized. Prerequisite: NUR 322, 323, 324.

407-2 to 3 Nursing Leadership and Management in Health Care

Examination of theories and strategies of leadership and management in the realm of health care. Prerequisite: NUR 322, 323, 324.

411-10 Nursing Process: Human Existence and Health IV

Uses the nursing process with individuals and families adapting to long-term health impairments. Emphasizes the effect of political, social, and environmental forces on accessing the health care system. Related clinical experiences are provided. Prerequisite: NUR 304 and 313.

412-10 Nursing Process: Human Existence and Health V

Uses the nursing process with individuals and families across the life span who are experiencing depleted health states with healthy and impaired communities. Learning opportunities emphasize interdependent and collaborative activities in a variety of settings. Prerequisite: NUR 411 or 318.

413-10 Nursing Process: Human Existence and Health VI

Emphasizes leadership in caring for individuals, families, and communities with multiple health states. Learning opportunities focus on leadership in a variety of settings. Prerequisite: NUR 412.

414-1 to 4 Nursing Elective

Topics vary. Prerequisite: NUR 218.

415-1 to 4 Independent Study

Faculty-directed, individualized study on student-selected topics. Permission of faculty required. Prerequisite: NUR 218.

421-6 Nursing in Mental Health Systems

Focuses on primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of mental health problems with individuals, families, and groups. Foundations of psychosocial nursing practice are developed. Cultural, biosocial, and sociopolitical forces affecting mental health systems are analyzed. Prerequisite: NUR 322, 323, 324.

422-6 Nursing in Community Health Systems

Clinical course integrating nursing and public health concepts/trends to assess community health needs. Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention for health of individuals, families, groups, and communities affected by social, political, and environmental forces are stressed. Prerequisite: NUR 322, 323, 324.

423-6 High Acuity Nursing in Complex Health Systems

A clinical course focusing on individuals experiencing life-threatening physiological crises. Integrates physiological, family, and community knowledge with concepts of high acuity care in a variety of settings. Prerequisite: NUR 322, 323, 324.

424-7 Synthesis Practicum in Professional Nursing

Clinical course which assists students in integration of theory and practice with emphasis on complexity of design and management of nursing care for individuals, families, and groups. Provides concentrated clinical practice in selected clinical areas. Graded pass/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: NUR 421, 422, 423. Corequisite: NUR 408.

425-3 Synthesis Practicum in Professional Nursing

Integration of theories and concepts for transition into professional practice with the evolution of a personal philosophy of nursing. May be taken for letter grade or pass/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: NUR 406, 407, 422. For RNs only.

462-2 to 3 Advanced Health Assessment

Expands RN's knowledge of history taking and physical assessment as it relates to clients across the lifespan and in a variety of settings. RNs admitted to completion program only.

498-3 Nursing Honors Seminar

Students discuss selected problems, issues, and special topics related to nursing that are not covered in depth during the usual curriculum. Students identify an area of interest and develop a project proposal for in-depth study. May be taken for letter grade or pass/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: NUR 304, 321.

499-1 to 3 Nursing Honors Independent Study

Provides an opportunity for development and completion of an honors project using theories and concepts from the humanities, sciences, and nursing. With guidance of a faculty member, students focus on an area of individual study. May be taken for letter grade or pass/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: NUR 498.

Office Administration/OA

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information.

201-3 Beginning Shorthand

Development of a vocabulary/writing skill in Gregg shorthand. Permission of instructor required for students with shorthand skills.

202-3 Intermediate Shorthand

Continued vocabulary and writing skill development in Gregg shorthand. Emphasis on dictation and ability to transcribe accurately. Prerequisite: OA 201 or equivalent proficiency; OA 211 or equivalent.

203-3 Advanced Shorthand

Emphasis on dictation, transcription skills and speed building in Gregg shorthand. Prerequisite: OA 202 or equivalent proficiency and permission of advisor.

210-3 Keyboarding

Basic instruction in keyboarding and document formatting with word processing software.

211-3 Beginning Typewriting

A mastery of the basic skills in touch typewriting. The typing of letters, reports, short tabulations, themes, manuscripts, and office memoranda.

212-3 Intermediate Typewriting

Mastery of the basic skills in keyboarding using word processing software. Typing of letters, reports, short tabulations, themes, manuscripts, and memoranda. 2 lab hours per week required. Prerequisite: OA 211 or permission of instructor.

213-3 Advanced Typewriting

Acquired skills and knowledge in keyboarding, word processing, and document formatting are reinforced on an advanced level in the mailable production of a variety of business communication. Instruction and practice are provided in the use of office dictation/transcription equipment. 2 hours lab per week required. Prerequisite: OA 212.

220-3 Introduction to Word/Information Processing

Introduction to word/information processing through the study and application of word processing software. Prerequisite: OA 212.

221-3 Intermediate Word/Information Processing

An introduction to the Windows environment with advanced word and information processing applications, including tables, columns, merging, sorting, macros, styles, graphics, and basic desktop publishing. 2 lab hours per week required. Prerequisite: OA 220.

222-3 Advanced Word/Information Processing with Desktop Applications

Basic typography and design principles supplement advanced WordPerfect techniques in desktop applications. 2 lab hours per week required. Prerequisite: OA 221.

301-3 Beginning Transcription

Advanced dictation, speed building, and introduction to machine dictation in the transcription of mailable documents using word processing software. Prerequisite: OA 203, 212.

305-3 Office Information Systems I

Course designed to acquaint students with the use of computers, telecommunications, LAN (Local Area Network) technology, electronic calculations, printers, FAX machines, and reprographics.

401-1 to 4 Office Practicum

Gives students work experience in an actual office environment while being supervised/directed by a college coordinator of business education.

411-3 Office Management and Administration

Provides a solid foundation in the theory and practice of administrative office systems. There is an emphasis on the roles of effective leadership and human relations skills in office administration and supervision. Prerequisite: ED 214 through 221 or equivalent.

Pharmacology/PHR

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information.

340-3 Pharmacology

Introduction to general principles of pharmacology, drug classification, and the sites and mode of action of selected drug agents. Prerequisite: CHM 102; P&B 301, 302.

410-3 Introduction to Pharmacology

Covers basic principles of pharmacology, including dose-response relationships, mechanisms of drug action and resistance, the concept of drug receptors and specific binding, and biological transport and distribution of drugs. Prerequisite: BIO 112; CHM 211.

495-2 to 5 Honors Research in Pharmacology

Experiential learning for honors program students interested in basic biomedical research. Tutorial with laboratory.

499-2 to 4 Undergraduate Research

Experiential learning in which students participate in ongoing research projects. Tutorial with laboratory.

Philosophy/PHL

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information.

124-3 Social Ethics and Values

Investigation of fundamental ethical issues in our society. Includes such issues as power, law, race, war, population, ecology, violence vs. pacifism, and punishment vs. rehabilitation.

204-3 Great Books: Philosophy

Introduction to selected great books in the history of Western philosophy chosen from each of three eras (ancient/medieval, modern, and contempo-rary) and examined both within their respective historical frameworks and as an exercise in critical thinking.

211-3 Introduction to Ethics

Survey of the important theories concerning the nature of moral value and obligation.

212-3 Introduction to Metaphysics

Survey of the important theories concerning the nature of reality, mind and body, and freedom and determinism.

213-3 Theories of Knowledge

Survey of the important theories concerning the origin, structure, methods, certainty, and validity of knowledge.

215-4 Inductive Logic

Introduction to the techniques of inductive and probabilistic reasoning with emphasis on the problems encountered in attempting to justify those techniques.

223-4 Symbolic Logic I

Introduction to the techniques of deductive logic including truth-table analysis, the prepositional calculus, and predicate logic.

280-3 Philosophy of Religion: Faith and Reason

(Also listed as REL 280.) Selected cross-disciplinary issues arising from philosophy and religion: Judeo-Christian concept of God, grounds for belief and disbelief, revelation and faith, religious language, verification, immortality and resurrection, and karma and reincarnation. Issues are discussed on the basis of selected texts on faith and reason.

281-3 Philosophy of Religion: Contemporary Western Survey

(Also listed as REL 281.) Cross-disciplinary perspective on philosophical and religious schools of thought in the early twentieth century. Absolute and personal idealism, spirit, value, positivism and naturalism, history and culture, modernism and pragmatism, religious consciousness, and phenomenology.

301-4, 302-4, 303-4 History of Philosophy

301: pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato and Aristotle; Epicureanism, stoicism, skepticism, neo-Platonism, and early medieval philosophy. 302: medieval and Renaissance philosophy; Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. 303: Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, logical positivism, process philosophy, and existentialism.

323-4 Symbolic Logic II

Standard notations, principles of inference, formal systems, and methods of proof. Focus on first-order predicate logic. Prerequisite: PHL 223 or instructor permission.

341-4 Aesthetics

Study of theories concerning the nature of the work of art, aesthetic experience, the arts, and beauty.

371-4 Business Ethics

(Also listed as REL 371.) Case study and discussion of ethical issues involved in business transactions and management.

378-4 Ethics and Medicine

(Also listed as REL 378.) Examination of ethical issues confronting society in the areas of medicine and health care, from the perspective of philoso-phical and theological ethics. Examples include ethics of abortion, euthanasia, experimental medicine, and behavior control.

382-4 Philosophy of Religion: Process

(Also listed as REL 382.) Realism and the revolt against idealism. Cross-disciplinary analysis of major contemporary philosophers and the impl-ications of their thoughts for religion. Focus on Alfred North Whitehead.

383-4 Philosophy of Religion: Secular

(Also listed as REL 383.) Cross-disciplinary analysis of modes of human awareness through which religious meaning is expressed (sensation, morality, beauty, reason, and human relations). Examination of presuppositions of contemporary secular religion in existentialism.

394-4 Existentialism

(Also listed as REL 394.) Representative writers of the existentialist movement.

399-1 to 4 Studies in Selected Subjects

Problems, approaches, and topics in the field of philosophy. Topics vary.

401-3 Major Philosophers

Introduction to the major writings of outstanding philosophers. Involves presentation and critical examination of the philosophers' views.

414-4 Philosophy of Law

Survey of the important theories concerning the nature and justification of law, liberty, justice, responsibility, and punishment. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

415-4 Philosophical Problems

Detailed examination of one of the outstanding philosophical problems-ancient, medieval, and/or contemporary.

431-4 Classical and Medieval Political Philosophy

(Also listed as PLS 402.) Critical examination of political ideas from 500 b.c. to a.d. 1500 with special attention to Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, and Machiavelli.

432-4 Modern Political Philosophy

(Also listed as PLS 403.) Critical examination of political ideas from 1600 to 1900, with special attention to Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Hume, Burke, Hegel, Bentham, Marx, and Mill.

442-4 Philosophy and Literature

Examination of philosophical ideas found in literature, philosophical interpretations of literature, and evaluation of theories and aesthetics of literature.

443-4 Asian Religious Philosophy

(Also listed as REL 443.) Perennial themes in Asian cultures (such as individual, society, and cosmos; appearance and reality; time and history; and karma, freedom, and responsibility) as they have been treated in the philosophical traditions of these cultures.

471-4 Philosophy of Physical Science

Analysis of views concerning scientific explanation, the logic of theory testing, and the ontological status of theoretical entities; philosophical examination of the concepts of space, time, matter, and motion from classical physics to contemporary relativity.

472-4 Philosophy of Social Science

Analysis of views concerning concept and theory formation in the social sciences, problems in objectivity and value, justification of Verstehen, mechanism vs. teleological explanations, and reductionism.

481-3 to 4, 482-3 to 4, 483-3 to 4 Independent Reading

Faculty-directed readings in philosophic literature.

Physics/PHY

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information.

101-1, 102-1, 103-1 Principles of Physics Laboratory

Introductory-level laboratory problems. Corequisite: for 101, PHY 111; for 102, PHY 112; for 103, PHY 113.

105-3 Sounds and Colors

Study of wave motion with an orientation toward phenomena experienced by our senses, such as musical sounds, noise, and the colors occurring in nature. Corequisite: PHY 115.

106-3 Revolutions in Physics

Introduction to astronomy with emphasis on the solar system. Topics include the earth-moon system, other planets and their satellites, space exploration, and theories for the origin of the solar system. Corequisite: PHY 116.

107-3 Stars, Galaxies, and the Cosmos

Introduction to astronomy with emphasis on the universe of stars and galaxies. Covers stellar evolution, astrophysics, and cosmology. Corequisite: PHY 117.

111-4, 112-4, 113-4 Principles of Physics

Introduction to fundamental phenomena, principles, and laws of physics. Prerequisite: for 111, MTH 128 or 129, or equivalent; for 112, PHY 111; for 113, PHY 112. Corequisite: for 111, PHY 101; for 112, PHY 102; for 113, PHY 103.

115-1 Sounds and Colors Laboratory

Experiments to illustrate the physical aspects of what we see and hear. Laboratory component of PHY 105 for students using the course to meet the General Education science requirement.

116-1 Revolutions in Physics Laboratory

Astronomical observations and experiments. Laboratory component of PHY 106 for students using the course to meet the General Education science requirement.

117-1 Stars, Galaxies, and the Cosmos Laboratory

Astronomical observations and measurements, laboratory experiments, and a visit to a plane-tarium. Laboratory component of PHY 107 for students using the course to meet the General Education science requirement.

122-3 Revolutions in Physics

Microscopic structure of matter from the atomistic theory applied to gases and crystals to the underlying structure. Topics include electricity-atomic glue, quantum theory and atoms, the nucleus and nuclear energy, and fundamental particles. Laboratory is listed as PHY 132.

123-3 Suns, Moons, and Planets

Introduction to astronomy with emphasis on the solar system. Topics include the earth-moon system, other planets and their satellites, space exploration, and theories for the origin of the solar system. Laboratory is listed as PHY 133.

125-3 Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe

Introduction to astronomy with emphasis on the universe of stars and galaxies. Topics include stellar evolution, galaxies, origin and evolution of the universe, and astrophysics. Laboratory is listed as PHY 135.

132-1 Revolutions in Physics Laboratory

Experiments stress the relationship of everyday phenomena to basic physical principles. Laboratory component of PHY 122 for students wishing to use course to meet General Education science requirements.

133-1 Suns, Moons, and Planets Laboratory

Astronomical observations and experiments. Laboratory component of PHY 123 for students wishing to use course to meet General Education science requirements.

135-1 Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe Laboratory

Astronomical observations, laboratory experiments, and a visit to a planetarium. Laboratory component of PHY 125 for students wishing to use course to meet General Education science requirements.

200-1 General Physics Laboratory

Introductory physics laboratory problems in mechanics. Corequisite: PHY 240.

202-1 General Physics Laboratory

Introductory physics laboratory problems in electricity and magnetism. Corequisite: PHY 242.

204-1 General Physics Laboratory

Introductory physics laboratory problems in heat, sound, mechanics, and optics. Prerequisite: PHY 240 and 200. Corequisite: PHY 244.

210-3 General Physics

Selected topics in mechanics; introduces use of calculus in interpretation of physical phenomena. Prerequisite: PHY 112, 113; MTH 230.

211-3 General Physics

Selected topics in electricity and magnetism; introduces use of calculus in interpretation of physical phenomena. Prerequisite: PHY 112, 113; MTH 230. After successfully completing PHY 111, 112, 113, 210, and 211, students may take courses that have PHY 240, 242, and 244 as prerequisites.

215-4 Introduction to Lasers

An elementary introduction to lasers including basic theory, properties of laser light, construct of a laser, types of lasers, measurement of laser emission, laser safety, and laser applications. Primarily for nonphysics majors. Prerequisite: MTH 128 or MTH 129, and PHY 113 or CHM 122.

240-4 General Physics

Introductory survey of mechanics for science and engineering students. Introduces the use of calculus in interpreting physical phenomena. Topics include vectors, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotation, and statics. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation. Prerequisite: MTH 229 or permission of department. Corequisite: PHY 200, MTH 230.

242-4 General Physics

Introductory survey of electricity and magnetism. Uses calculus in interpreting physical phenomena. Topics include electric field and potential, currents, DC circuits, magnetic fields, and Faraday's law. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation. Prerequisite: PHY 240, MTH 230. Corequisite: PHY 202.

244-5 General Physics

Introductory survey of thermodynamics, oscillations and waves, sounds, fluids, gravity, and optics. Calculus is required in interpreting physical phenomena. Prerequisite: PHY 240 and MTH 230; or permission of department. Corequisite: PHY 204.

245-4.5 Concepts in Physics

An accelerated treatment of fundamental concepts and applications of physics for elementary education majors. Practical observable topics appropriate for presentation to elementary and middle school students will be emphasized. Includes laboratory experiences, demonstrations, and projects. Elementary education majors only. Integrated lecture/lab. Prerequisite: MTH 143, ENG 102, SM 145.

260-4 Introduction to Modern Physics

Introduces phenomenology and theoretical concepts of modern physics, such as special theory of relativity and quantum theory; atomic and molecular structure and spectra; x-rays and solid state physics; nuclear structure, reactions, and natural radioactivity; and instrumentation for nuclear physics research. One hour is devoted to demonstrations and recitations. Prerequisite: PHY 210, 211, or 244; MTH 230.

310-3 Issues in Science

(Also listed as BIO 310, CHM 310, MTH 310, and GL 310.) A writing-intensive course dealing with issues in science. Prerequisite: ENG 101, 102; a first-year science course.

315-3 Physics Instrumentation Laboratory I

Physics laboratory experiments with an emphasis on electrical measurements and electronic instruments. Lectures on circuit theory, experiment design, and electronic instruments. 1.5 hours lecture, 3 hours lab. Corequisite: PHY 260 or permission of instructor.

316-3 Physics Instrumentation Laboratory II

Experiments emphasizing electronic instruments applied to areas such as mechanics, atomic physics, and nuclear physics. Lectures on applications of integrated circuits to experimentation, data analysis, and data presentation. 1.5 hours lecture, 3 hours lab. Prerequisite: PHY 315.

322-4 Applied Optics

(Also listed as EP 322.) Study of optical instruments by means of both geometrical and physical optics. Theory and application of interferometry and light detection devices. Brief introduction to lasers and holography. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Prerequisite: PHY 244 or equivalent; MTH 253.

371-3, 372-3 Analytical Mechanics

Intermediate problems in statics, kinematics, and dynamics; equilibrium of forces, rectilinear motion, curvilinear motion, central forces, constrained motion, energy and moments of inertia, and the Lagrange method. Prerequisite: PHY 210, 211, or PHY 244; MTH 232. Corequisite: MTH 233.

400-3 Properties of Semiconductor Materials

(Also listed as EP 400.) Crystal structure, energy bands, charge carriers, and carrier motion in semiconductors. Electrical and optical properties. P-N junction diodes. Equilibrium, dc, ac, and transient characteristics. Metal-Semiconductor junctions. Device design. Prerequisite: PHY 240, 242, and 244 and CHM 121. (Previously listed as PHY 300.)

401-3 Semiconductor Device Physics

(Also listed as EP 401.) Structure and characteristics of bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and other selected devices. Design and computer modeling of devices. Prerequisite: PHY 300/EP 300. (Previously listed as PHY 301.)

402-3 Semiconductor Device Processing

(Also listed as EP 402.) Survey of the individual processes used in fabricating semiconductor devices. Integration of these processes to produce MOS and bipolar structures. Computer design aids. Prerequisite: PHY 300, 301, or EP 300, 301, or ME 370, or permission of instructor. (Previously listed as PHY 302.)

420-3 Thermodynamics

First and second laws of thermodynamics; general thermodynamic formulas with applications to matter. Prerequisite: PHY 210, 211 or 244.

421-3 Statistical Thermodynamics

Topics include kinetic theory of gases, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, and an introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: PHY 420.

422-5 Introduction to Geophysical Prospecting

(Also listed as GL 422.) Introduction to principles of gravity, magnetic, seismic, electrical, and radioactive prospecting. 4 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Prerequisite: MTH 229.

424-4 Gravity and Magnetic Exploration

(Also listed as GL 424.) Study of the theory of the earth's gravitational and magnetic fields and the application of these principles to resource exploration. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Prerequisite: PHY 422 or permission of instructor.

432-3 Lasers

(Also listed as EP 432.) Introduction to the physics of lasers including emission and absorption processes in lasing, the factors controlling laser gain, the properties of optical resonators, and a survey of salient features for principal types of lasers. Prerequisite: PHY 260, MTH 233 or permission of instructor.

450-3, 451-3, 452-3 to 4 Electricity and Magnetism

Fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism from viewpoint of fields. Maxwell's equations, transient and steady state currents, electric and magnetic properties of matter, and electromagnetic radiation. Prerequisite: PHY 210, 211, or 242; MTH 232, 233.

460-4 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

Mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. Applications to selected one- and three-dimensional problems with emphasis on atomic structure. Prerequisite: PHY 260, 372; MTH 333.

461-4 Introduction to Solid State Physics

Selected properties of solids and their quantitative explanation in terms of simple physical models. Applications of quantum mechanics to solids. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Prerequisite: PHY 316, 460.

462-4 Nuclear and Particle Physics

Nuclear properties and models, radioactive decay, nuclear applications, elementary particle properties and interactions, the standard model. Prerequisite: PHY 460.

470-3 Selected Topics

Selected topics in physics. Prerequisite: PHY 372.

480-4, 481-3, 482-3 Introduction to Theoretical Physics

Introduction to classical theoretical physics. Emphasis on mechanics, electromagnetic field theory, and mathematical techniques. Prerequisite: PHY 372, 452; MTH 333. Departmental approval required.

488-1 to 3 Independent Reading

Prerequisite: PHY 240, 242, 244; or equivalent.

494-3 Senior Projects

Selected problems in experimental and theoretical physics with critical analysis of results.

499-3 Special Honors Research Problems

Special research in a recognized branch of physics, usually related to research carried on by the department. Critical analysis of results required.

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