Not all courses described here are offered every quarter or every year. For a more detailed listing of prerequisites, enrollment restrictions, and specific courses offered in a particular quarter, consult the Wright State class schedule published each fall, winter, spring, and summer.

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Biomedical Engineering/BME

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information.

155-4 Adaptive Computer Technology

Presented for physically impaired students for the purpose of familiarizing them with adaptive computer usage. It is structured to teach necessary skills related to each student's rehabilitative needs.

300-0 Honors Program Seminar

An orientation course intended for juniors who have demonstrated exceptional academic ability and desire to conduct meaningful independent research or solve unique engineering design projects during their senior year. Meets 5 times during quarter. Graded pass/unsatisfactory.

402-2 Biomedical Engineering Design II Laboratory

Design project teams will meet with their advisor(s) on a weekly basis to review progress, make assignments, and further incubate students with design methods. Prerequisite: BME 440, 461, 491; concurrent enrollment in BME 492 is required.

403-2 Biomedical Engineering Design III Laboratory

Design project teams will meet with their advisor(s) on a weekly basis to review progress, make assignments, and further incubate students with design methods. Prerequisite: BME 492; concurrent enrollment in BME 493 is required.

419-3 Biomedical Engineering Systems I

Derivation and use of the basic conservation laws underlying the fluid mechanical behavior of the cardiopulmonary system. Includes applications to the flows of blood, pulmonary air, and extra-corporeal fluids. Prerequisite: ME 212, 315, MTH 233.

420-3 Biomedical Engineering Systems II

Introduction to transport phenomena in biomedical engineering and physiological systems. Energy and mass balances together with constitutive and empirical relationships are used in quantifying such topics as body heat loss by the various modes, diffusion mass transport, and heat/mass transport in applicable technological systems. Prerequisite: BME 419.

422-3 Engineering Biophysics

Application of mathematical and engineering techniques toward describing biophysical systems. Topics include cellular transport, electrical properties of membranes, and biophysics of muscle contraction. Prerequisite: EE 321 or permission of instructor.

428-3 Biomechanics and Biothermodynamics

Application of solid mechanics and thermodynamics toward describing physiological systems. Topics include mechanics of the skeletal, cardiac, and pulmonary systems, and analysis of the biothermal regulation system. Prerequisite: ME 212, 315 or permission of instructor.

439-4 Biotransport and Artificial Organs

Introduction to transport processes vital to the design of medical devices for artificial intervention into living systems. Topics include circulatory system dynamics, mathematical modeling of physiological systems, membrane transport, and biological/artificial organ design. Prerequisite: BME 420.

440-4 Biomaterials

Application of properties of materials and solid mechanics to problems and design of medical implants, external prostheses, and living tissues. Topics include mechanical properties of biologic and synthetic materials, stress-strain analysis, viscoelasticity, tissue response to implants and vice versa, and implant materials for interfacing with hard and soft tissues and blood. Prerequisite: ME 213, EE 321.

461-4 Bioinstrumentation I

Principles of design and analysis of electronic instrumentation for medical applications. Topics include various electrodes/transducers for physiological measurement, imaging modalities, systems, and electrical safety. Prerequisite: EE 401, 402, 413, 414.

462-4 Bioinstrumentation II

Continuation of principles of design and analysis of electronic instrumentation for medical applications. Topics include various electrodes/transducers for physiological measurement and electrical stimulation, biological signal acquisition and processing, various medical imaging modalities/systems, and electrical safety. Prerequisite: BME 461.

463-2 Biomedical Computers I

Digital computer applications in biomedical related fields. Use of software to solve biomedical problems and display the results. Prerequisite: CEG 220, EE 301.

464-4 Biomedical Computers II

Principles, hardware structure, and programming techniques of microprocessors. Applications of microprocessor-based systems in hospitals, rehabilitation engineering, and medical research. Prerequisite: BME 463.

470-3 Photon Radiation

Basic introduction to generation, effects, and detection of ionizing radiation and its application to medicine. Successful completion of this course entitles students to be registered users of radio-active isotopes. Prerequisite: PHY 242, 244, BIO 279.

471-3 Medical Imaging

Overview of the various methods used in generating images in medicine. Basic principles of the image-forming process and the physical properties of the resultant image are discussed. Prerequisite: BME 470.

491-3 Biomedical Engineering Design I

Individualized design projects allowing students to make use of design and analytical skills. Prerequisite: BME 420. Corequisite: BME 440, 461.

492-1 Biomedical Engineering Design II

Individualized design projects allowing students to use design and analytical skills. Prerequisite: BME 440, 461, 491; concurrent enrollment in BME 402 is required.

493-3 Biomedical Engineering Design III

Individualized design projects allowing students to use design and analytical skills. Prerequisite: BME 492; concurrent enrollment in BME 403 is required.

499-1 to 5 Special Problems in Engineering

Special problems in advanced engineering topics. Topics vary.

Business/BUS

100-3 Horizons in Business

Covers the range of activities, challenges, opportunities, and career paths in the world of U.S. and global business. Includes an overview and introduction to such diverse areas as the economic setting, international business, the structure of business, management of American business, human resources, marketing, information systems, accounting, finance, and ethics in business.

480-3 to 6 Special Topics in Business

Topics vary. May be taken for letter grade or pass/unsatisfactory.

481-1 to 6 International Trade Internship

Practical application in international trade. Integrates academic learning with work experiences. Students apply classroom learning in an organizational setting. Limited to International Business majors with senior status. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

486-3 International Trade Management

Overview and application of the concepts and principles required to conduct import and export operations within the firm. Students apply inter-national trade management concepts through participation in an international trade team project. Prerequisite: MGT 302; MKT 302; FIN 302; EC 441.

Chemistry/CHM

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information.

101-4.5 Introduction to Chemistry

Historical approach to the fundamentals of chemistry: composition and structure, properties and transformations of matter. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.

102-4.5 Elementary Organic Chemistry with Applications

An elementary discussion of the structure of hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, and a few selected reactions. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab. Prerequisite: CHM 101 or 121.

105-4 Chemistry of Our World: Living Things

Examination of the principles of covalent bonding, structures, and reactions of molecules important to living things, with attention to the technological, regulatory, and social complexities of problems related to them. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

106-4 Chemistry of Our World: Materials

Examination of the bonding of metals and nonmetals to explain the nature of familiar materials of industrial importance. Attention to the risk/benefit implications of these materials and technologies for consumers. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab. Prerequisite: 3 units of high-school science or equivalent; or CHM 101; or CHM 105.

107-4 Chemistry of Our World: Energy and the Environment

Examination of gaseous and liquid states and thermochemistry as a basis for understanding air and water quality and fossil and nuclear fuels. Attention to the chemistry of the solar system. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Prerequisite: 3 units of high school science or equivalent; or CHM 101; or CHM 106.

121-5 Submicroscopic Chemistry

Structure and properties of atoms and molecules and the macroscopic consequences thereof. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 1 hour recitation. Prerequisite: High school chemistry or CHM 101; and MTH 127 or level 4 on math placement test.

122-5 Macroscopic Chemistry

Physical and chemical behavior of large collections of atoms and molecules. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 1 hour recitation. Prerequisite: CHM 121.

123-5 Reaction Dynamics

Quantitative aspects of chemistry; emphasis on computational and experimental estimation of the composition of chemical systems. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 1 hour recitation. Prerequisite: CHM 122; MTH 128 or 129 or level 5 on math placement test.

191-5 Modern General Chemistry I: Organic

Organic chemistry with its applications is presented with fundamental chemical concepts introduced as they are necessary to explain the subject. Prerequisite: High school chemistry or CHM 101; and MTH 127 or level 4 on math placement test.

192-5 Modern General Chemistry II: Materials

Useful materials are presented from a chemical point of view with fundamental concepts introduced as needed. Prerequisite: CHM 191.

193-5 Modern General Chemistry III: Energy

The relationships between energy and matter are explored with fundamental chemical concepts introduced as needed. Prerequisite: CHM 192 and MTH 128 or 129 or level 5 on math placement test.

211-4, 212-4, 213-4 Organic Chemistry

Principles, theories, and applications of the chemistry of carbon compounds. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation. Prerequisite: for 211, CHM 123; for 212, CHM 211; for 213, CHM 212. Corequi-site: for 211, CHM 215; for 212, CHM 216; for 213, CHM 217.

215-2 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

Laboratory illustrations of CHM 211 lecture material and techniques of preparative organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 123. Corequisite: CHM 211.

216-2 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

Laboratory illustrations of CHM 212 lecture material and techniques of preparative organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 215. Corequisite: CHM 212.

217-2 Organic Chemistry Laboratory III

Laboratory illustrations of CHM 213 lecture material and techniques of preparative organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 216. Corequisite: CHM 213.

245-4.5 Concepts in Chemistry

An accelerated treatment of fundamental concepts and applications of chemistry for elementary education majors. Those concrete observable topics most appropriate for presentation to elementary and middle school students will be emphasized. Demonstrations and activities are used extensively. For Elementary Education majors. Integrated lecture/lab. Prerequisite: MTH 127 or level 4 on math placement test and MTH 145.

302-4 Environmental Chemistry

(Also listed as CHM 502.) Water, air, and soil chemistry including pollutants added to these environments and how they interact to create environmental problems. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab. Prerequisite: CHM 123 or 193.

310-3 Issues in Science

(Also listed as BIO 310, PHY 310, MTH 310, and GL 310.) A writing-intensive course dealing with issues in science. Prerequisite: ENG 101, 102; a first-year science course.

312-3 Quantitative Analysis

Introduction to chemical methods of analysis covering traditional as well as modern techniques and equipment; emphasis on calculations and the interpretation of analytical data. Prerequisite: CHM 123. Corequisite: CHM 314.

314-4.5 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

Experimental methods of analysis. Practical applications of lecture material presented in CHM 312. Prerequisite: CHM 123. Corequisite: CHM 312.

361-4 The Organic Chemistry of Engineering Materials

Molecular structure, stereochemistry, properties, and reactivities of selected organic substances of industrial importance, including fuels, lubricants, solvents, coatings, plastics, dyes, and naturally occurring engineering materials. Not open to students with credit for CHM 212. Prerequisite: CHM 122.

402-4 Advanced Environmental Chemistry and Analysis

(Also listed as CHM 602.) Environmental sampling and analysis using instrumental techniques. Chemical fate prediction by measurement and examination of physical and chemical properties. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab. Prerequisites: CHM 312/314 and 213; or permission of instructor.

410-3.5 Environmental Chemistry I: Air

Study of the Earth's atmosphere including its normal composition and atmospheric reactions; emphasis on nature, causes, effects, detection, and abatement of various types of air pollution. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, or field project. Prerequisite: CHM 213, 312; or permission of instructor.

411-3.5 Environmental Chemistry II: Water

Study of the Earth's fresh and saline water including its normal composition and aquatic reactions; emphasis on nature, causes, effects, detection, and abatement of various types of water pollution. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab or field project. Prerequisite: CHM 213, 312; or permission of instructor.

412-3.5 Environmental Chemistry III: Solids

A survey of the problems of solid wastes, pesticides, food additives, and radioactive materials including their chemical composition, effects, detection, disposal, and natural breakdown. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab or field project. Prerequisite: CHM 213, 312; or corequisite CHM 416.

417-3 Applied Chemical Spectroscopy

The practical applications of various spectrophotometral techniques (mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance) are integrated for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. A problem-solving approach is used. Prerequisite: CHM 213, 312, 452 or permission of instructor.

419-3 Chemical Literature and Composition

Literature searching of journals, handbooks, abstracts, and patents. Writing of literature reports, abstracts, papers, and reports. 3 lectures. Prerequisite: CHM 212, 451. (Previously listed as CHM 319.)

420-3, 421-3 Inorganic Chemistry

Principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry including the periodic table, atomic structure, chemical bonding, coordination compounds, and an introduction to group theory. Prerequisite: CHM 453 or permission of instructor.

425-3 Advanced Inorganic Synthesis and Characterization

Advanced synthesis and characterization of representative inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 417, 420 or permission of instructor.

435-3 Instrumental Analysis

Introduction to the theory and practice of modern chemical instrumentation. Elementary electronics, spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, electro-chemical techniques, chromatography, and other instrumental techniques. Prerequisite: CHM 312, 452. Corequisite: CHM 436.

436-4.5 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

Introduction to experimental instrumental analysis. Practical experience in the operation of chemical instrumentation; emphasizes applications of material presented in CHM 435. Prerequisite: CHM 312, 452. Corequisite: CHM 435.

440-3, 441-3 Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry I, II

Covers various chemical aspects of drugs including synthetic design, mode of action, and uses of various pharmaceuticals. Topics include cardiovascular agents, antibiotics, anti-tumor agents, and central nervous system drugs. Prerequisite: CHM 213.

443-3, 444-3 Chemical Toxicology I, II

Study of the basic principles of chemical toxicology. Chemicals that have the greatest incidence of abuse are discussed in detail with regard to their chemical-biological interactions, symptomatology of toxicity, clinical chemistry tests, and treatment. Prerequisite: CHM 213, 312.

445-3 Advanced Organic Synthesis and Characterization

Advanced synthesis and identification of organic compounds. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab. Prerequisite: CHM 213, 217, 417.

451-3, 452-3, 453-3 Physical Chemistry

Theoretical aspects of chemistry including thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, molecular structure and spectra, and the structure of solids and liquids. Prerequisite: for 451, CHM 123, MTH 231, and PHY 242 or 113; for 452, CHM 451; for 453, CHM 452; or permission of instructor.

457-3 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

Experimental methods of physical chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 312, 314. Corequisite: CHM 452.

458-3 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II

Experimental methods of physical chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 457. Corequisite: CHM 453.

461-3 Synthetic Polymer Chemistry

Step-growth and chain-growth polymerization in homogeneous and heterogeneous media; properties of commercial polymers. Prerequisite: CHM 213 and 451; or CHM 361; or permission of instructor.

465-3 Physical Polymer Chemistry

Introduction to the structural and physical aspects of macromolecules; emphasis on the relationship of polymer structure to physical and mechanical properties. Prerequisite: CHM 213 and 451; or 361; or permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHM 467.

467-1 to 2 Physical Polymer Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory illustrations of CHM 465 lecture material and techniques of polymer science. Corequisite: CHM 465.

468-1 to 2 Polymer Synthesis Laboratory

Laboratory illustrations of CHM 461 lecture material and techniques of polymer science. Pre- or corequisite: CHM 461.

469-4 Engineering Plastics: Materials, Processes,

and Design (Also listed as ME 489.) Properties and manufacturing processes of engineering plastics, and effects of these factors on plastics design. Illustrative laboratory projects are included. 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab. Prerequisite: CHM 465.

479-4 Materials Corrosion

(Also listed as ME 479.) Survey of principles of corrosion processes with application to metallic and nonmetallic materials. Principles of electro-chemistry are included. Prerequisite: ME 315, 371, or corequisite CHM 453, or permission of instructor.

488-1 to 3 Independent Reading

499-1 to 5 Special Problems in Chemistry

Chinese/CHI

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information.

111-4 Essentials of Chinese

Introduction to Chinese with emphasis on speaking the language.

Classics/CLS

Note: See quarterly class schedule or departmental advisor for further enrollment restrictions, requirements, or special course information. Courses under this heading do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

100-4 Latin and Greek Roots in English

Builds English vocabulary through a study of Latin and Greek roots. Emphasis on words used commonly in higher education rather than on specialized terminology.

101-4 Medical and Scientific Terminology

Spelling, recognition, and understanding contemporary specialized medical and scientific vocabulary that is based on the Latin and Greek languages. Emphasis on terminology of the medical sciences.

150-3 Greek and Roman Culture

Survey of the development of classical culture from prehistoric Greece to the fall of the Roman Empire. A broad view of the interrelated political, economic, and social conditions, and philosophy, religion, mythology, literature, art, and architecture.

160-3 Introduction to Classical Mythology

Survey of the myths and legends of ancient Greece and Rome that are an important part of the Western literary and cultural tradition. Emphasis on story patterns and characters. CLS 150 is strongly recommended, but not required, as a prerequisite for all advanced courses.

300-4 How We Know about Antiquity

How do we know what we think we know about classical antiquity? Study of the different types of evidence and of ways in which this evidence is analyzed, handled, and interpreted by scholars.

310-4 The Golden Age of Greece

Greek experience in fifth and fourth centuries b.c. with emphasis on Athenian democracy and the Golden Age of Athens: drama, history, oratory, and philosophy.

320-4 Rome: Republic and Empire

Emphasis on Late Republic and Early Empire, particularly the Augustan Age. The idealism of Virgil and Lucretius; the realism of Cicero, Sallust, and Tacitus. The following courses offer a variety of topics; they may be repeated for credit by number, although not by content. Students should consult the department for the scheduled subjects.

330-4 Studies in Ancient Literature

Drama, epic, and lyric poetry; prose; selected themes in ancient literature; and literary criticism.

340-4 Studies in Ancient Art and Archaeology

(Also listed as ART 411.) Greece in the Bronze Age; classical Greece and Rome; and selected areas of Greek and Roman archaeology.

350-4 Studies in Ancient Culture and Society

Greek and Roman civilization with evidence from art, literature, archaeology, law, and other sources.

360-4 Studies in Ancient Mythology

Greek and Roman mythology; aspects and approaches to the study of myths; and archaeological and nonliterary sources.

370-4 Studies in Ancient Law, Government,

and Politics Law and legal systems of Greece and Rome; government and administration; and political problems of the ancient world.

399-1 to 4 Studies in Selected Subjects

Course of variable content dealing with problems, approaches, and topics in the field of classics.

481-4 Independent Reading

Directed studies in literature, mythology, archaeology, law, and government. For classical humanities majors only.

499-2 Senior Comprehensive Review

Required of majors in the classics, Greek, or Latin. Independent study and review leading to comprehensive examination based on the course work undertaken by each individual student. For classics, Greek, or Latin majors only.

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