2008-2013 University Overview

GOAL 1

ACADEMIC DISTINCTIVENESS AND QUALITY

Enhance our distinctive learning experience to produce talented graduates with the knowledge and skills essential for critical thinking, meaningful civic engagement, international competency, an appreciation for the arts, lifelong learning and the ability to lead and adapt in a rapidly changing world.

Objective A
Ensure the alignment of General Education, the major, assessment, undergraduate and graduate program review, and co-curricular activities with the above goal.

  • During the quarters-to-semesters conversion, curricula from each program were successfully evaluated and refreshed to improve their relevance and effectiveness for contemporary students.
  • During the conversion to semesters, University Learning Outcomes were articulated as part of the development of the Wright State Core. Every course approved for the Wright State Core identified the University Learning Outcomes that the course addressed.
  • The College of Education and Human Services served in a leadership role in Ohio in the implementation of the national Teacher Performance Assessment for pre-service and novice teachers.
  • Undergraduate minors in Chinese Studies, Russian Studies, and Sexuality Studies were created, and certificates in the African American Experience in Education, African American and Gender Experiences, and the History and Philosophy of Science were launched.
  • The Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies (B.T.A.S.) degree at Lake Campus was approved. Six students graduated from the program in April 2013.
  • Walters Kluwer Public Accounting Report August 2013 ranked the undergraduate accountancy program as 15th and the Master of Accountancy program 16th in the U.S. for programs with 15 or fewer full-time faculty.
  • The Graduate School instituted a new systemic process of doctoral program review, including external review, to ensure that doctoral graduates are well prepared for leadership and critical thinking in their fields.
  • The Department of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management developed the Master of Information Systems and Master of Science in Logistics and Supply Chain Management, including over 50 capstone projects that contributed to the region’s economic growth.
  • The M.B.A. program was nationally ranked by Bloomberg Businessweek and was included in Princeton Review’s Top Business Schools from 2010 to 2013.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business has been accredited by AACSB since 1974, a standard of excellence achieved by fewer than one in three U.S. business programs and five percent worldwide.
  • The School of Professional Psychology Psy.D. program and the Doctoral Internship program received the highest level of re-accreditation from the American Psychological Association in 2009 and 2012, respectively.
  • In 2012, Wright State participated in the HLC Academy for the Assessment of Student Learning and is engaged in an ongoing university-wide project to assess student mastery of the University Learning Outcomes in both the Core and the major.
  • The Department of English Language and Literatures’ first-year writing program was one of three programs in 2010 to receive the Liberal Studies’ Exemplary Program Award for accomplishments in creative programs by General Education faculty and administrators.
  • Wright State began distributing The New York Times across campus to enrich student learning inside and outside the classroom, provide an additional resource for students to explore global issues, promote critical thinking and discussion, and engage students in active learning.
  • Raj Soin College of Business began promoting its minor programs to students in the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Science and Mathematics.
  • The College of Education and Human Services engaged in a process of continuous improvement, adjusting its assessment plan to better meet the needs of all programs and to align with the university’s assessment plan. 
  • Multiple College of Education and Human Services programs received national accreditation.
  • Communications and Marketing assisted the Raj Soin College of Business with the production of its accreditation materials.
  • Communications and Marketing worked with the schools and colleges to migrate their websites into a new content management system, providing more consistent presentation of information across all sites.
  • The Department of Physics created the Core General Education course The Physics of How Things Work.
  • Biomedical Sciences faculty have published approximately 200 research papers and received $10–27 million in research funding. 
  • The Biomedical Sciences Program awarded 41 doctorates from 2007 to 2012. Graduates have followed highly successful yet divergent career paths, including postdoctoral fellows/associates at university, medical, and veterinary schools; research scientists in industry or government; practicing physicians/residents; and faculty members in academic settings.
  • The Department of Biomedical Sciences created an exploratory area of concentration to assess the feasibility of a new track on Biomedical Education.
  • The Lake Campus finalized 13 agriculture and graphic design articulation agreements with area local school districts and career centers.
  • The Lake Campus offered the Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing focus.
  • A new Food Science faculty member was hired at Lake Campus to develop the degree.
  • Lake Campus faculty include 30 full-time members, 24 of whom have doctorates in their disciplines.
  • The Lake Campus offered eight bachelor degrees.
  • The College of Education and Human Services reviewed all programs during the 2010–12 academic years, deciding whether to maintain, strengthen, or eliminate each program. CEHS utilized data management systems to make data-driven decisions about programs.
  • The Accounting Leadership Program provided mentoring, enrichment classes, scholarships, and co-curricular activities to support underrepresented students seeking degrees and careers in accounting.
  • Beta Alpha Psi, the accounting honor society, recognized students for academic excellence, professionalism, and leadership.
  • The Human Resources program received the National Superior Merit Award from Society for Human Resource Management annually from 2003 to 2012.
  • The Human Resources program placed first and second in the National Case Competition of the Human Resources Society for the Advancement of Management for 10 consecutive years.
  • The Department of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management developed a joint “Big Data” collaboration with the Department of Computer Science and Kno.e.sis.
  • The Department of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management provided leading-edge courses in Radio Frequency Identification and App technology.
  • Undergraduate Information Systems and Supply Chain Management students conducted over 60 projects with industry partners over the past five years, resulting in innovation and financial value for the various partners.
  • Over 100 students were inducted to the student honorary society Alpha Iota Delta over the past five years.
  • Wright State’s undergraduate business program in Management Information Systems was the first in Ohio to be accredited by ABET. It was reaccredited in 2012.
  • The Ellis Human Development Institute became a certified community mental health agency by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and received CARF, an international accreditor of health and human services agencies, reaccreditation in 2011.

Objective B
Diversify and enrich academic and professional programs, including non-degree.

  • U.S. News & World Report ranked the online master’s in teacher leader program, which trains teachers to be leaders in the field, No. 1 in faculty credentials and training.
  • Wright State’s Institute of Defense Studies and Education unveiled a state-of-the-art professional training program designed to teach students how to defend against cyber attacks and construct computer systems that are more prepared to fend them off.
  • The R.N.-to-B.S.N. program was redesigned to meet the needs of working nurses. The online program also incorporated elements from the Institute of Medicine’s report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing.
  • Wright State launched the Doctor of Education in Organizational Studies, the first doctoral program to be offered by the College of Education and Human Services and the only program of its kind in the region.
  • Wright State was awarded a five-year, $2.86 million National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant to increase the representation of women in STEM fields in the region.
  • Wright State, the University of Dayton, Central State University, and the Air Force Institute of Technology collaborated to start the state’s first master’s program in Clean and Renewable Energy.
  • The Department of Computer Science developed a Master of Science in Cyber Security program, the first of its kind in Ohio.
  • The College of Liberal Arts created a joint M.A. in Social Work with Miami University, providing the first master’s-level education in social work in the Miami Valley.
  • The Department of Neuroscience and Physiology developed an Anatomy Teaching track to meet demand for teachers of anatomy.
  • The Department of Computer Science and Engineering and the College of Liberal Arts collaborated to provide dual majors to students interested in pursuing computer science or computer engineering and philosophy, English, or history degrees.
  • In the wake of devastating disasters like Hurricane Katrina and the earthquake in Haiti, the College of Nursing and Health created the Flight and Disaster Specialization for the Adult-Gero Clinical Nurse Specialist program.
  • The College of Engineering and Computer Science expanded distance learning courses to include computer science and mechanical engineering and to support the Lake Campus Mechanical Engineering program.
  • STEAM3, which combines STEMM disciplines with art and music, was offered to art and music education majors.
  • The Wright State Research Institute provided undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to enrich their academic experience through both paid and unpaid internships and research projects focused on exciting, real-world problems.
  • The Pre-Health Program created the public health minor to provide an understanding of community health and different career opportunities.
  • The Boonshoft School of Medicine was the first medical school in the nation to implement Team-Based Learning, giving students real-world experience by working closely in small groups to master material, applying their knowledge to clinical cases, and defending their diagnosis and treatment plans. Faculty have provided training in Team-Based Learning and curriculum development to more than 40 medical and health profession schools in the United States and more than 10 worldwide.
  • New asynchronous online programs were created in collaboration with Academic Partnerships, including the M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction for Teacher Leaders, M.Ed. in Educational Leadership for Principals, Ed.S. in Curriculum and Instruction with CIPD license, and Ed.S. in Educational Leadership for Superintendents.
  • The university signed a memorandum of understanding with Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an University of Arts and Science, and Xi’an University of Finance and Economics in China.
  • Five tenure-track faculty (Melissa Schen, Ph.D., Jeff Peters, Ph.D., Volker Bahn, Ph.D., Lynn Hartzler, Ph.D., and Kate Excoffon, Ph.D.) joined the Department of Biological Sciences, and three others (Labib Rouhana, Ph.D., Shulin Ju, Ph.D., and Quan Zhong, Ph.D.) were hired in 2013.
  • Biomedical Sciences faculty come from 18 different departments, three colleges, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.
  • The Pre-Health Program developed the MCAT Prep Course to assist students in need and implemented the Post-Bac Certificate for returning/career-changing students.
  • The Department of Leadership Studies formed a partnership with Academic Partnerships to grow online programs.
  • The College of Engineering and Computer Science established the Distinguished Speaker Series.
  • The College of Education and Human Services and the College of Liberal Arts collaborated to develop the Youth and Community Engagement minor.
  • Robert Riordan, Ph.D., conducted archaeological excavations at Fort Ancient each summer, providing students with hands-on archaeological survey and excavation experience.
  • Army ROTC cadets broadened their international cultural knowledge through the Cultural Understanding and Language Program. In the program, students are immersed in a foreign culture while accomplishing a real-world mission, exposing cadets to the Army’s pre-deployment, deployment, and post-deployment requirements.
  • The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences implemented a low-residency program leading the Master of Science Teaching (Earth Science) degree.
  • The Department of Communication established an internship program with the Dayton Daily News
  • Among Ohio’s 54 four-year public and private universities that field men and women athletic teams, Wright State comes the closest to meeting the U.S. Department of Education’s Title IX gender-equity criterion of having the percentage of male and female athletes closely match the school’s general gender population.
  • The College of Education and Human Services established and strengthened global partnerships with universities in England, Taiwan, and China, resulting in student and faculty exchanges.
  • The College of Education and Human Services adapted program offerings to meet the needs of the local, regional, and global economy. New programs created during the past three years include the Ed.D. in Organizational Studies, M.Ed. in Educational Technology for Health Professionals, a minor in Emergency Management (in collaboration with the College of Nursing and Health and Calamityville), certificate in Instructional Design in Online Learning, Computer Information Science Multi-Age teaching license, non-licensure classroom teacher Learning and Motivation M.Ed., German and Latin licensure programs, Early Childhood and Middle Childhood Education generalist endorsements, minor in Youth and Community Engagement, Community Health program, and Teacher Leader endorsement.
  • The College of Education and Human Services offered professional development and continuing education courses for area school districts, educators, and human services professionals through the Division of Professional Development.
  • Undergraduate clinical nursing courses have integrated significant clinical simulation time, and faculty collaborate with the Boonshoft School of Medicine for innovative scenarios for nursing students across the curriculum.
  • Stories about academic programs are published in the online Newsroom and in Community Magazine and Wright State University Magazine.
  • The M.B.A. program developed and offered five foundation courses online with the goal of offering all courses online.
  • Female physics students participated in the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • The Department of Physics developed the Interdisciplinary Applied Sciences and Mathematics Ph.D. Program to address additional synergistic research and educational collaborations in the Dayton area.
  • The M.B.A. program designed new concentrations in health care management; management, innovation, and change; and new venture creation and investments. 
  • The Department of Economics created dual degree programs in Business Economics and in Finance, M.S. in Social and Applied Economics and Master of Public Administration, and undergraduate certificate program in Economics.
  • In response to student interest and community need, the School of Professional Psychology initiated its first formal concentration, the Child Emphasis area, to provide distinctive child generalist training.
  • Janeece Warfield, Psy.D., became a registered play therapist-supervisor in 2013 and was a fellow at the Association of Play Therapy’s Leadership Academy in 2011.
  • The Ellis Institute received a multi-year grant from the Vectren Foundation to create a state-of-the-art playroom for children’s services and student training.
  • Communications and Marketing worked with the schools and colleges to migrate their websites into a new content management system, providing more consistent presentation of information across all sites.

Objective C
Recruit and retain a nationally/internationally recognized diverse, learning centered faculty and staff.

  • The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant, by professors and award-winning filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar, was nominated for an Academy Award.
  • In 2008, James Dobbins, Ph.D., was the third School of Professional Psychology faculty member to become president of National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology, and chaired its mid-winter conference Advancing the Multicultural Agenda: From Aspiration to Actualization.
  • Wright State Research Institute neuroscientist Michael Weisend, Ph.D., has been featured in Newsweek, Business Week, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Scientific American, and the Science Channel series Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman for his non-invasive brain stimulation techniques.
  • The vice president for multicultural affairs and community engagement in collaboration with the Office of Human Resources and the Office of Equity and Inclusion implemented standardized search committee training.
  • The Department of Psychology hired two new joint Wright State/Air Force Human Resources Laboratory faculty in human factors psychology.
  • Army ROTC provided networking opportunities for cadets pursuing civilian degrees due to their service in the National Guard or Army Reserve upon commissioning.
  • Charlotte Harris, Ed.D., dean of the College of Education and Human Services, was recognized by the American Educational Research Association Research on Women and Education special interest group for significant contributions to the association on behalf of women, girls, and education. She was also inducted into the Girl Scouts of Western Ohio Dayton Region’s Hall of Fame.
  • Larry James, Ph.D., served as president of the Health Psychology Examining Board of the American Board of Professional Psychology.
  • The College of Science and Mathematics instituted diversity/equity issues training sessions for all search committee chairs.
  • Diversity is exemplified among the 11 university deans as the deans council includes six female members, three men of international birth, and two African Americans.
  • Joseph Slater, Ph.D., received the Affiliates Societies Council Outstanding Engineering Educator Award, and Thomas Hangartner, Ph.D., received the Fulbright Scholar Award.
  • Classical humanities students received hands-on experience excavating ruins and working in museums with Bronze Age material in Greece.
  • Ann Burke, M.D., was named to the American Board of Pediatrics and the ABP Foundation in 2012.
  • Joseph Keferl was the recipient of the Excellence in Leadership Award for the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (ARCA) and the Educator of the Year Award for the National Council on Rehabilitation Education. He was also elected president of ARCA.
  • William Mosier, Ed.D., was elected treasurer of the National Association for Early Childhood Teacher Educators.
  • Karen Wonders, Ph.D., was the recipient of the fellowship distinction of the American College of Sports Medicine.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology hired five tenure-track faculty: Christopher Wyatt, Ph.D., Barbara Kraszpulska, Ph.D., Ashot Kozak, Ph.D., David Ladle, Ph.D., and Sherif Elbasiouny, Ph.D. The department implemented successful mentoring initiatives for its junior faculty relating to NIH grant funding and tenure track progression.
  • Paula Bubulya, Ph.D., served as chair of the Midwest regional RNA Society, and Lynn Hartzler, Ph.D.,  served as president of the Ohio Physiological Society.
  • Judy Jagger-Mescher served as a national trainer for the National Health Education Standards.
  • Ron Helms, Ph.D., served on a number of National Council for the Social Studies committees and program reviews.
  • Communications and Marketing promoted Wright State and its Ohio Centers of Excellence, which cut across traditional boundaries to solve problems and create innovative solutions.
  • In 2010, Cheryl Meyer, Ph.D., was named University Professor.

Objective D
Enhance the quantity and quality of dialogue with our various communities to ensure our academic relevance and distinctiveness.

  • Wright State conducted the Diversity and Inclusion Project, a cultural assessment survey accompanied by a new website dedicated to the initiative. Following the survey, several campus Diversity and Inclusion Town Hall Meetings were held to engage students and staff in discussions about diversity on campus.
  • Wright State was recognized by G.I. Jobs magazine and Military Advancement Education magazine and as a “Military Friendly School.”
  • Wright State continues to foster and explore innovation through diversity on campus with the Diversity in the Multicultural Millennium Conference, whose 2013 theme was Affirmative Action: 52 Years of Debate.
  • Wright State was named among the top disability-friendly universities in College Success for Students with Physical Disabilities, which was published in 2012.
  • The Division of Multicultural Affairs and Community Engagement was created, and Kimberly Barrett, Ph.D., was hired as the vice president for multicultural affairs and community engagement.
  • Every college created a Dean’s Student Advisory Board to advocate on behalf of student communities. Initiatives included establishing programs of study, increasing supplemental instruction, and resolving technical issues that students face.
  • Environmental Health and Safety collaborated with a Libyan pharmacologist to develop safety-related training materials for his university.
  • The College of Nursing and Health launched a marketing and recruitment campaign that aligned its curriculum to match current standards of the accrediting body.
  • Communications and Marketing produced Community magazine, and in 2011, redesigned it as the Wright State University Magazine, highlighting news from alumni, students, faculty, and staff.
  • The 2011 Regional Summit, “Wright State Means Jobs,” was an online event featuring numerous videos about Wright State programs. Communications and Marketing created the website and produced many of the videos displayed online.
  • The Honors Institute created a scholarly conference setting integrating classroom learning and service-learning for students and faculty, saving $2,250.
  • The Department of Physics established educational collaborations with the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Boonshoft Museum of Discovery, and Dayton Regional STEM School.
  • Wright State’s official Twitter account, managed by Communications and Marketing, has grown to 3,500 followers. The president’s Twitter account has over 1,000 followers, since it was started in September 2013.
  • Wright State’s Facebook account, managed by Communications and Marketing, has over 14,000 followers. Posts have reached a total number of 2,293,530 people, with 27,642 click-throughs to posted content.
  • Boonshoft School of Medicine hosted the national M.D./M.B.A. conference Physician Leadership in the 21st Century in 2009.
  • The College of Nursing and Health forged a strong relationship with nursing leadership at the Dayton VA Medical Center and started a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program to care for veterans returning from conflicts.
  • Communications and Marketing started producing a “Legislative Newsletter” using student editors.
  • The University Honors Program served as the administrative home of the Mid-East Honors Association, a regional honors subsidiary of the National Collegiate Honors Council. The University Honors Program coordinated the annual MEHA conferences in 2011 and 2012.
  • College of Engineering and Computer Science alumnus Eric Graham spearheaded the creation of Advaretech, a for-profit company focused on commercializing Wright State–developed technologies.
  • The College of Education and Human Services revised its agreement with nine local school districts to align with the agenda of the National Network for Educational Renewal and the design principles for Clinically Based Teacher Preparation.
  • The Department of Physics collaborated with faculty and students at the Air Force Institute of Technology.
  • Jeffery Allen, Ph.D., served as a member of the Interdisciplinary Group, which also includes Allied, Health, Medicine, Social Work, and Nursing.
  • The Ellis Institute increased the number of clients served in Dayton by 40 percent in 2011, and by 23 percent in 2013.
  • Counseling and Wellness Services started an Active Minds chapter to reduce the stigma of mental illness on campus and beyond.
  • In 2011, Victor McCarley, Psy.D., became the first School of Professional Psychology faculty member to serve on the State Board of Psychology.
  • Environmental Health and Safety earned the Golden Spoke award from Disability Services for promoting independence and full participation for people with disabilities as a result of an internship provided to a student from the Office of Disability Services.
  • Environmental Health and Safety participated in a partnership alliance to design a Scientific and Industrial Laboratory Management Operations and Safety Certification process for the Nigerian government.
  • The College of Nursing and Health collaborated with area partners, including Sinclair Community College, Miami Valley Hospital, and Graceworks, to re-launch the Nursing Institute of West Central Ohio.
  • The College of Education and Human Services created and strengthened collaborations and partnerships with community organizations and local school districts, providing the college with ample opportunities for applied learning, research, and professional development.
  • The College of Education and Human Services established lines of communication with local school districts through the Educator Preparation Advisory Council, which brings educators and representatives from CEHS and the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Science and Mathematics together to discuss issues affecting education and teacher preparation.
  • In 2013, the College of Education and Human Services held its first Network for Educational Renewal Conference, which allowed Wright State faculty and staff to engage with the teachers and administrators from the partnership school districts.
  • Communications and Marketing assisted with the Day of Innovation, which featured a daylong online discussion on regional development.
  • The Department of Human Services held an alumni and clinical supervisors conference in 2013.
  • The College of Nursing and Health established an Academic Community Advisory Board composed of representatives of industry, nonprofits, local nursing schools, hospitals, health departments, and long-term care facilities.
  • Since July 2011, Communications and Marketing has posted roughly 2,100 stories or links to stories in the online Newsroom. The Wright State News Twitter feed has 2,600 followers.
  • In 2013, Communications and Marketing developed a Social Media Managers Group with 99 campus members representing 77 divisions, departments, units, or organizations. The group’s goal is to provide strategy to all Wright State social media channels.
  • Emergency Management and Communications and Marketing developed a Crisis Communications Plan for the university and participated in a functional exercise for the policy group in 2012.
  • Enrollment Management and Communications and Marketing developed an orientation communications plan in which the university communicates monthly with prospective students who have applied for admission.
  • Communications and Marketing developed a poster series to communicate H1N1 information to the campus community.
  • Enrollment Management and Communications and Marketing developed the “Parents as Partners” newsletter.
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology graduate students received numerous honors: Khadijeh Alnajjar, Student Research Achievement Award at the International Biophysical Society Annual Meeting; Madhu Mahankali, American Heart Association Predoctoral Fellowship to research the connection between phospholipase D, reactive oxygen species, and the basis for arterial damage; and Christopher Vaiana, Air Force Director’s Military Award.
  • The University Honors Program promoted civic-minded and creatively engaged students through its annual Honors Institute, offering courses and an annual symposium on topics such as sustainability, free speech, and exploring the oceans.

GOAL 2

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Enhance student access to and successful participation in higher education through quality and innovative instruction and student life programs that increase graduation and career placement for a diverse student body.

Objective A
Improve the enrollment and retention of direct-from-high-school, graduate and nontraditional student populations.

  • RaiderConnect, students’ single point of contact for Enrollment Services, was opened in Fall 2013, providing integrated, student-centric enrollment services, streamlining their experiences in support of retention.
  • From Fall 2008 to Fall 2010, Wright State’s total enrollment grew more than 12 percent to a record of nearly 20,000 students. Despite a declining number of high school graduates in Ohio, the university saw a 10.7 percent increase in the number of direct-from-high-school students.
  • By Fall 2010, Wright State had more than 6,300 students over the age of 24. These nontraditional students make up 32 percent of the university’s student body.
  • The Multicultural Centers expanded the Pathways new student success program to include more sessions on academic success for a larger range of students, including first-generation students, students of color, and student’s families.
  • The university increased the number of international students from 605 to 788 between 2008 and 2012 and doubled the number of Chinese students, from 70 to 142.
  • Established in 2009, the Wright State Graduation Fund provides scholarships to help financially needy students complete their degrees.
  • Student Government created an associate director of veterans’ affairs position to improve the university experience for nontraditional veteran students and their spouses.
  • Student Government, Rainbow Alliance, the Office of Student Activities, the Women’s Center, and Counseling and Wellness Services created the GLBTQA Resource Room and trained nearly 400 people in the Safe Space Program to enhance diversity appreciation.
  • The Ph.D. in Engineering program celebrated its first 100 graduates in Fall 2011.  The program, a unique interdisciplinary collaboration between the Departments of Biomedical, Industrial, and Human Factors Engineering; Electrical Engineering; and Mechanical and Materials Engineering, is set to realize unprecedented growth and is recruiting top students from around the world.
  • A total of 1,330 student events were planned over the past five years.
  • The College of Science and Mathematics hosted the first Direct Connect to encourage increased enrollment of direct-admission high school students into the college and demonstrate the university’s commitment to research.
  • The Office of Financial Aid created a need-based grant program to better serve students with high levels of financial need. This program is modeled annually to serve students who have need and to address enrollment/retention efforts.
  • A weekend M.B.A. program was established at Sinclair’s Courseview Campus in Mason.
  • Retention activities in the College of Engineering and Computer Science, under the leadership of Dean Nathan Klingbeil, Ph.D., have become a national model.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology expanded its master’s programs in anatomy, physiology, and neuroscience to admit approximately 120 students. 
  • The College of Engineering and Computer Science created new articulation and partnership agreements with community colleges in Ohio.
  • Raj Soin College of Business met regularly with Dayton Early College Academy students to discuss college preparedness, college student life, and careers in the business field.
  • The Physics Graduate Program graduated the most students in Ohio during the 2011–12 academic year.
  • Following the implementation of several recruitment and student success strategies, the number of physics majors increased by 40 percent over the previous four-year average.
  • The university hosted Pathway to Health Professions for high school students intending to study in pre-health fields.
  • The Department of Physics increased from 14 majors in Fall 2007 to 51 majors in Fall 2013.
  • Biological Sciences faculty and students traveled to the rainforests of Peru, Ecuador, and Suriname during Amazon Ecology courses.
  • The Department of Biology had the most students complete departmental honors research on campus.
  • University College implemented a study coach program that matches highly trained student peers with students to enhance their learning strategy skills.
  • The Rinzler Student Sports Complex and Mulhollan Field opened, enhancing the quality of life for all students.
  • Enrollment Management and Communications and Marketing developed an orientation communications plan in which the university communicates monthly with prospective students who have applied for admission.
  • Enrollment Management and Communications and Marketing developed the “Parents as Partners” newsletter.
  • Communications and Marketing created a new design for Admissions recruitment materials aimed at high school juniors and seniors.
  • The university's Changing Lives image campaign continued in 2012 with new testimonials from students and alumni whose lives have been changed by their time at Wright State.
  • The first-year physics seminar for incoming majors won a Wright State Learning Communities Award and has increased physics majors’ success.
  • Communications and Marketing created new displays in the Student Union to bring life and Wright State branding to common areas used by visitors and faculty, staff, and students.
  • Web-based preparation is created for college transition for students with disabilities, parents, teachers, and counselors.
  • In 2008, the Boonshoft School of Medicine’s Horizons in Medicine program celebrated its 13th anniversary of providing science and health care instruction to local students, mostly from disadvantaged or minority backgrounds.
  • The College of Education and Human Services changed its admission procedure for transfer students, increasing enrollment and improving the admission experience.
  • Cameos of Caring increased to 18 the number of participating health care agencies. The event has raised thousands of dollars to support student scholarships, with over $162,000 awarded since 2008.
  • New Semesters and Semesters Advising websites were created, assisting students with the quarters-to-semesters transition.
  • Communications and Marketing developed the Take 5 campaign to educate students on the semesters conversion, resulting in increased MAP submissions and a surge in advisor appointments for fall registration.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program received more than 65 applications for its Ph.D. program each year, and approximately 75 percent of applicants accepted offers.
  • The Department of Psychology increased its grant funding from $1 million to $3 million.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program conducted a favorable five-year self-study review.
  • New direct-from-high-school freshmen are more prepared than ever, with an average ACT score of 22 and average high school GPA of 3.2.
  • New transfer student enrollment increased more than 18 percent in the past five years.
  • New Hispanic student enrollment increased more than 27 percent in the past 5 years.
  • The College Readiness program delivered important content to high school students, including academic enrichment, non-cognitive skills, financial aid and literacy, application process, and cultural enrichment.
  • The Division of Enrollment Management introduced new technology to streamline processes to better serve students.
  • The Office of Financial Aid moved the university to Direct Lending before it became a federally mandated requirement, better positioning the office to enrich processing capabilities and streamline loan processing.
  • The Office of Financial Aid enhanced the automation of packaging and loan processing in Banner to expedite service.
  • The WINGS Express Portal was enhanced to allow students to finalize financial aid processing and to allow quicker disbursement of financial aid.
  • The Office of Financial Aid expanded student service capabilities, including new online processes, extended hours of operation, and better customer service training for staff.
  • During Fall 2012, the Academic Performance Scholarship Program was enhanced to better serve students who meet certain aspects of academic merit.
  • The Deans’ Scholarship Program was created to recruit high-quality academically prepared students.
  • The Choose Ohio First Program, which is fully funded by the state, attracted additional students to Wright State University for STEM disciplines, students with disabilities, and graduated/professional students. This program grew in scope and has assisted with the recruitment and retention of high-quality Ohio students in various disciplines across campus.
  • Orientation delivered student-focused activities, peer connections, information about transitioning to college, academic success resources, and tools to foster adjustment to the physical campus environment. New students are also introduced to opportunities for service-learning, study abroad, diversity, and career development.
  • Freshmen Convocation attracted well-known and inspirational guest speakers: Rocsi Diaz, 2013; John Legend, 2012; Eric Klien, 2011; Ishamel Beah, 2010; and Chris Sacca, 2009.
  • The Division of Enrollment Management hosted nationally recognized enrollment management expert David Kalsbeek of DePaul University, who shared best practices in financial-aid leveraging, in 2011 and 2012.
  • The Wright State Research Institute supports full-tuition scholarships for Dayton Regional STEM School students attending Wright State.

Objective B
Enhance the academic success of students.

  • Undergraduate research is promoted via the annual Research Celebration and online publication of scholarly articles.
  • The university developed the Wright State Academy, a five-week intensive course designed to give at-risk students the writing and study skills necessary to succeed in college courses.
  • The Math Studio opened, transforming developmental math into an emporium, mastery learning model yielding a 13 percent increase in student pass rates.
  • University College developed the Math Academy, a five-week intensive summer course designed to remediate student math skills to be college-ready by fall semester.
  • For the last 34 years, the Model United Nations team achieved the highest recognition possible at the National Model UN Conference in New York City.
  • In 2010, Raj Soin College of Business students placed in the top three for the ninth consecutive year at the Society for Advancement of Management Annual National Case Competition.
  • The National Survey of Student Engagement graded Wright State as showing improvement in its level of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, and support for success and enrichment.
  • Among 259 student-athletes, 135 have had an average GPA of 3.0 or above for 30 consecutive quarters.
  • Undergraduate Admissions, the College of Education and Human Services, the United Latin American Citizens, and the Hispanic Catholic Ministry collaborated on a recruitment initiative to tutor elementary Hispanic students.
  • School of Professional Psychology students achieved 100 percent placement for their fifth-year doctoral internship. Students compete nationally for these slots. This achievement comes in spite of increasing disparity in the number of accredited placements and the number of students applying.
  • A physics teaching innovation grant focused on active learning methodologies for students and implementing lesson study for faculty development. 
  • Environmental Health and Safety staff helped develop curriculum for the Ohio Department of Health’s general X-ray machine operator course offered through the Biomedical Engineering Department.
  • The research group of Ivan Medvedev, Ph.D., was selected to present their research “Diagnostic Chemical Analysis of Exhaled Human Breath using a Novel Terahertz (THz) Spectroscopic Approach” in Washington, D.C., at the Council on Undergraduate Education Posters on the Hill 2013.
  • Boonshoft School of Medicine’s innovative community-based medical education program produced graduates who are accepted into the nation’s top residency programs, including Harvard’s Cambridge Health Alliance, Stanford, Cleveland Clinic, Duke, and Mayo Clinic.
  • In Fall 2013, the Department of Physics awarded three $1,000 Undergraduate Research Scholarships to incoming direct-admit students.
  • The Biomedical Sciences Program re-implemented and revitalized the M.D./Ph.D. Dual Degree Program.
  • Carla Benton, a junior physics major, received a 2009 Presidential Commendation for Excellence in Co-curricular Activities and presented her research at the annual Undergraduate Poster Session on the Hill.
  • The Biomedical Sciences curriculum was reorganized to better reflect the faculty’s research strengths. By reducing 11 areas of concentration to four more-focused tracks, the curriculum is more effective and efficient.
  • The number of Wright States students who were accepted into medical school was 10 to 15 percent above the national average.
  • Pre-health student organizations received more than $6,000 in grants.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business supported direct-from-high-school students and parents throughout their college decision-making process with four new seminars.
  • Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology faculty published 146 publications, including in top tier journals like Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Human Factors.
  • Communications and Marketing developed the on-campus Take 5 campaign to educate current students on the semesters conversion, resulting in increased MAP submissions and a surge in advisor appointments for fall registration.
  • In 2011 Zach Gault, an undergraduate physics major, presented at International Optical Terahertz Workshop in Santa Barbara.
  • The College of Nursing and Health hired a student success coordinator to focus on program assessments for students and address outcomes.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program received the Teaching Innovation Grant in 2013.
  • Twenty-four students graduated from the Ph.D. in Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program.
  • The Psychology Undergraduate Program Office was established in 2007.
  • An undergraduate student in the behavioral neuroscience concentration in psychology was awarded a SMART scholarship.
  • The Division of Multicultural Affairs and Community Engagement presented data to the president’s cabinet and deans’ council on campus culture and the relative success of students of color to identify opportunities to improve student success.
  • The Department of Physics connected undergraduate students to summer and academic year research opportunities.
  • In 2012, the Diversity Inclusion Committee offered student scholarships for products addressing the impact of diversity on their professional development.
  • In memory of Betty Yung, Ph.D., a faculty member who died in 2012, the Health Path Foundation of Ohio endowed a fund to support dissertation work and students working in violence prevention, in addition to supporting student travel and research.
  • Department of Environmental Health and Safety staff served as adjunct professors or guest lecturers in the Departments of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Chemistry, Community Health, and Pharmacology.
  • Medical student Colleen McCormick was one of 18 rising students across the nation to receive an American Medical Association Foundation 2012 Physicians of Tomorrow Award.
  • Medical student Jason E. Thuener received the American Medical Association Foundation's 2011 Leadership Award, which recognizes outstanding non-clinical leadership skills in advocacy, community service, and education.
  • Environmental Health and Safety provided training to hundreds of university faculty and staff on safety topics ranging from animal handling to hazardous materials.
  • Human Resources, in partnership with Organizational Development and Learning, provided a variety of trainings for employees and supervisors.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs invited a group of finance students to participate in a bond pricing and sale to provide a unique experiential learning opportunity.
  • Introductory Mathematics for Engineering Applications, which is funded by the National Science Foundation, provided students with the necessary math skills to begin their fundamental engineering and physics courses. This course has received national recognition for its success in achieving high student retention.
  • All first-year students are advised by College of Engineering and Computer Science academic advisors, who help students register for classes and learn about scholarship opportunities.
  • The College of Education and Human Services was instrumental in the selection Student Success Collaborative, an early warning system to identify and help students struggling academically.
  • Nursing students continue to support the Student Mentoring Retention Team, which serves the academic and emotional needs of pre-nursing and nursing students through mentoring, education, and resource support.
  • In the last five years, 69 adult gerontological acute care nurse practitioner students and 93 family nurse practitioner students passed the national certification exam in their specialty area on the first try.
  • The university developed the Wright State Academy, a five-week intensive course designed to give at-risk students the writing and study skills necessary to succeed in college courses.
  • The Learning English for Academic and Professional Purposes Program grew significantly. Students from around the world have honed their linguistic, academic, and social skills before enrolling in credit-bearing courses and programs.
  • Wright State created military-only classes for students who are veterans or currently serving in the U.S. military. The classes offer a safe space for those returning from combat situations and a comfortable atmosphere for veterans.
  • The College of Liberal Arts and the College of Education and Human Services began offering the African American Experience in Education certificate program to help future educators relate to African American students, making them more effective teachers in urban public schools.
  • The Department of Modern Languages expanded offerings in foreign language instruction.
  • The College of Liberal Arts continues to offer the majority of Summer Ambassador Programs, with recent courses in South Africa, France, Spain, Germany, Costa Rica, and China.
  • Communications and Marketing developed an online-only university catalog with new semesters content.
  • A new display system for posters across campus was created by Communications and Marketing in order to eliminate posters on easels that were an obstruction to people with disabilities.
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology student Valery Lozada Fernandez won two National ABRCMS Biomedical Research awards for her poster presentation at the National ABRCMS Biomedical Research Conference.
  • Larry Ream, Ph.D., received the Robert J. Kegerreis Distinguished Professor of Teaching Award.
  • Nick Ritucci, Ph.D., and Larry Ream, Ph.D., received Teaching Excellence Awards from the Boonshoft School of Medicine.
  • University Honors Program students achieved an average four-year graduation rate of 77 percent and an average six-year graduation rate of 83 percent.
  • The number of University Honors Program students graduating with an Honors degree designation increased from 80 in 2009 to 145 in 2012.
  • Lake Campus increased enrollment in direct-from-high-school students.
  • Over 100 students enrolled in the Lake Campus’ Mechanical Engineering program in three years.
  • Seven Lake Campus engineering students will graduate in May 2014 and all have full-time positions with local companies.
  • Lake Campus offers post-secondary enrollment options and dual enrollment in Ohio transfer module courses.
  • Enrollment at Lake Campus is steady, with 83 percent of students seeking bachelor’s degrees.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business finalized semester articulation agreements with Sinclair and Clark State Community Colleges.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business developed a four-year business degree at Lake Campus.
  • Finance and Financial Services developed an online video library of lectures and problem solutions to assist students in introductory finance classes.
  • The Department of Management and International Business tripled the number of individually endowed scholarships.

Objective C
Develop effective educational processes to assist students in meeting post-graduate career and educational goals.

  • The Women’s Center and Career Services offered $tart $mart, a workshop that educates women about the wage gap and trains them to negotiate better salaries.
  • Each year, Career Services offered an Etiquette Luncheon to teach students about the finer points of business dining and networking.
  • The College of Engineering and Computer Science offered an assistantship program to provide scholarships, internships, and a path to employment for 30 undergraduate students at the Air Force Research Laboratory.
  • The College of Liberal Arts and the College of Education and Human Services began offering an African American Experience in Education certificate program, and the College of Liberal Arts and the Boonshoft School of Medicine began offering a Certificate in African American and Gender Experiences in Medicine.
  • The Department of Communication established an internship program with the Dayton Daily News.
  • College of Nursing and Health faculty agreed to require that 14 percent of undergraduate clinical courses include a simulation.
  • The College of Nursing and Health utilized the Living Laboratory at Bethany Village, high-fidelity mannequins, and standardized patients to provide students top-tier simulation experiences.
  • The Department of Environmental Health and Safety and the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences created internship opportunities for students.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business established an internship and scholarship program through the Speedway Executive Education Program.
  • The Organizational Leadership program implemented a new internship/service-learning program.
  • Wright State was a lead institution in piloting edTPA, a national performance assessment for teacher licensure candidates to evaluate their performance in the classroom. The experience of edTPA provides the foundation that a candidate will need as a new teacher.
  • The B.S. Environmental Health Sciences program includes a mandatory internship, with cooperation from environmental health agencies and industries.
  • The Psychology Undergraduate Program Office was established in 2007.
  • The University Honors Program established the National Scholarship Resource Center to provide support to students applying for prestigious national scholarships. Honors students won nine nationally competitive scholarships/fellowships between 2008 and 2012. 
  • In 2011, the School of Professional Psychology expanded its Professional Development Group for first-year students to a yearlong experience that includes coverage of the school’s history and training model, faculty scholarship areas, and presentations by alumni and community psychologists on psychology careers.
  • In 2013, SOPP reinstituted its Post-Doctoral Fellow training program.
  • The Aerospace Professional Development Center helps match students and workers with jobs in the Ohio aerospace and defense industry.

GOAL 3

RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

Expand our scholarship in innovative and targeted ways to address regional, national and global needs.

Objective A
Build a national and international research reputation

  • Wright State has been designated by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a research university with high research activity and ranked fifth among Ohio’s public universities in federal research expenditures for the last fiscal year (2011) for which figures were available.
  • Wright State and Premier Health formed the Clinical Trials Research Alliance to combine the biomedical research expertise of the Boonshoft School of Medicine with the clinical resources of the hospital system to increase medical research opportunities for physicians and clinicians. The alliance will increase patient access to research studies in the Dayton region by more efficiently linking investigators to study sponsors and streamlining the infrastructure to speed the entire process.
  • CELIA, the Ohio Center of Excellence in Collaborative Education, Leadership, and Innovation in the Arts, launched research initiatives. The CELIA fellows program supports innovative projects in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Each semester, a team of fellows collaborates on original compositions, performances, presentations, courses, and/or scholarly writings. The CELIA Distinguished Visiting Artist Program brings an internationally renowned artist to the campus for performances, exhibitions, and master classes. CELIA Seed Grants support pilot projects relating to collaborative and innovative projects and approaches to education and leadership in the arts.
  • The Wright State University and Premier Health Partners Neuroscience Institute and the Wright State Research Institute are partnering with the Air Force and a regional consortium of companies to solve human performance challenges in the areas of neuroscience and medical imaging, intelligence analyst performance, autonomous systems, and other domains.
  • The Neuroscience Engineering Collaboration (NEC) Building, which will be completed in 2015, will serve as a collaborative research location for Wright State’s neuroscience and engineering scholars from a number of departments from the Boonshoft School of Medicine, the College of Science and Mathematics, and the College of Engineering and Computer Science. Researchers in the NEC Building will focus on translational neuroscience research, neuroimaging, and device development.
  • The new Center for Manufacturing Sciences will focus on knowledge-based manufacturing and best practices, enabling students and manufacturers to connect through co-op and internship programs as well as web-based interactions. Larry Dosser, Ph.D., the center’s senior fellow for technology advancement, will bring in researchers from institutions such as Harvard and Notre Dame to present seminars and lectures on technical areas of advanced manufacturing.
  • The Air Force awarded $6.4 million in contracts to a regional consortium of companies led by the Wright State Research Institute for research to improve human performance in dealing with terrorist threats, combat fatigue, and other defense issues.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology faculty received a prestigious NIH Program Project Grant in Neuroscience.
  • Several serve on national review panels, including Thomas L. Brown, Ph.D., for an NIH study section, and Dawn Wooley, Ph.D., on the distinguished NIH Biosafety Panel.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology expanded its research endeavors by developing collaborative new research areas, including stroke, neuroimmunology, and neurodegeneration.
  • Ten faculty held individual National Institutes of Health or American Heart Association grants. 
  • Jeffery Allen, Ph.D., received funding from 2008 to 2011 from the Alzheimer’s Association to examine education as a predictor variable of cognitive decline and dementia in African American elders.
  • In 2009, Larry James, Ph.D., received the Booz-Black Award for Outstanding Research and Practice in Counseling Health Psychology from the American Psychological Association
  • The Wright State Research Institute portfolio has grown to more than $20 million and features innovative programs in neuroimaging, remotely piloted aircrafts, and more.
  • Wright State is home to seven Centers of Excellence, six of them designated as the state’s leading university center for its area of research. These centers partner with businesses and the military, generating new jobs and millions of dollars in economic impact. They focus on neuroscience, medical readiness, human-centered innovation, the arts, computing, micro-aerial vehicles, and product testing.
  • Ties between Wright State’s Aerospace Medicine Residency program and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are expanding and flourishing under the Base Realignment and Closure-directed consolidation.
  • The College of Engineering and Computer Science is home to four Centers of Excellence: Product Reliability and Optimization, Human-Centered Innovation, Knowledge-Enabled Computing, and Micro Air Vehicles. These centers drive innovation through cutting-edge research and strategic industrial and government collaborations.
  • Research by Chad Hammerschmidt, Ph.D., on the distribution of mercury in the ocean has been supported by National Science Foundation grants, resulting in one of the “Top-50 Most Cited Articles” in the prestigious journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta.
  • The Terahertz Research Cluster collaborated with numerous institutions, including Notre Dame, Virginia Tech, and the Air Force Institute of Technology, and industry partners like Samsung.
  • Wright State, Indiana University, the University of Tennessee, and Redondo Optics Inc., received a three-year $625,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop this new sensor technology with a focus on ultra-high sensitive protein and virus detection.
  • Wright State researchers, in conjunction with the University of Texas at Dallas and Samsung, are developing a disease-detecting exhalation device based on Terahertz Spectroscopy techniques.
  • Jane Fox, Ph.D., served as a scientific co-investigator on the NASA mission Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission.
  • More than 25 percent of physics faculty served on editorial boards of professional journals. 
  • College of Engineering and Computer Science students built an incubator to be used in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and created a design to improve artificial limbs for military veterans.
  • Elliott Brown, Ph.D., a pioneering physicist and engineer from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was named the endowed chair in experimental sensor physics.
  • Wright State received a $5 million contract from the Air Force for research related to unmanned aerial vehicles.
  • Boonshoft School of Medicine increased grant awards by nearly $700,000 to more than $27 million.
  • In 2011, the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology hosted Sir Paul Nurse, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate and president of the Royal Society, for the 2011 Varandani Lecture.
  • Communications and Marketing publicized Tom Hanks’ endorsement of CELIA and the College of Liberal Arts. A brochure featuring a cover photo of Tom Hanks was produced and mailed to university presidents and provosts across the country.
  • An advertising campaign, entitled Ahead of the Curve, which includes a Tom Hanks ad, was developed by Communications and Marketing for the Chronicle of Higher Education.
  • Work continues on the Fels Longitudinal Study, the world’s largest and longest-running study of human growth and body composition, thanks in part to more than $13 million in NIH funding.
  • In 2009, Katherine Cauley, Ph.D., was selected to serve on the World Health Organization’s Expert Advisory Group for Innovative Technologies for the “Global Initiative on Health Technologies” project.
  • In 2010, the Boonshoft School of Medicine and Miami Valley Hospital announced the formation of the Wright State and Premier Health Neuroscience Institute to speed the transfer of research discoveries from bench to bedside, improving the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders such as stroke.
  • The Wright State and Premier Health Neuroscience Institute presented its inaugural symposium Selected Topics in Translational Neuroscience in 2012.
  • In 2012, Dawn Wooley, Ph.D., was selected to serve on the prestigious 21-member Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.
  • In 2012, the Boonshoft School of Medicine partnered with the Wright State Research Institute and Premier Health to create the Wright State University and Premier Health Clinical Trials Research Alliance to increase medical research opportunities for physicians and clinicians and boost access to clinical trials in the Dayton region.
  • In 2013, Boonshoft School of Medicine researchers were awarded a $4.6 million National Institutes of Health grant to improve the movement of badly injured limbs.
  • Medical student Matias Iberico received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program scholarship in medical sciences to research pediatric tuberculosis among impoverished populations in Peru.
  • Environmental Health and Safety, Engineering and Construction, and Facilities Planning and Development regularly participated in the Dayton Regional STEM School’s job shadowing activities.
  • Environmental Health and Safety student internships led to discovery and improvement of unsafe conditions.
  • Environmental Health and Safety collaborated on a grant proposal to work on scientific and technological breakthroughs for the world’s most pressing health problems.
  • The College of Education and Human Services faculty have been involved with the Ohio Education Research Center, a network of six Ohio universities and four research organizations developing a longitudinal data archive for Ohio and conducting research projects for Ohio’s Race to the Top initiatives.
  • College of Education and Human Services faculty have received more than $8 million in state and national grants over the past five years. 
  • CEHS and the Mental Health and Recovery Board of Clark, Greene, and Madison Counties sponsored a national PAX/GBG training that brought teachers, school counselors, and social workers from around the United States.
  • The College of Nursing and Health received $1.08 million from Health Resources and Services Administration to support graduate students studying to become nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse educators, nurse administrators, and school nurses.
  • The Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology; and Biological Sciences launched a cell signaling cluster to establish a critical mass of biomedical researchers engaged in research examining cell pathways impacting various human diseases.
  • Robert E. W. Fyffe, Ph.D., was named a University Professor and Timothy Cope, Ph.D., received the Brage Golding Distinguished Professor of Research Award.
  • The Medical Mentoring program connected pre-med students with Boonshoft School of Medicine students.
  • More than half of pre-health students are involved in research or community service.
  • The Department of Psychology co-sponsored the International Symposium on Aviation Psychology with the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Human Effectiveness Directorate in 2007, 2009, and 2011.
  • The Department of Psychology increased its grant funding from $1 million to $3 million.
  • Three psychology faculty members had sabbaticals or summer research fellowships in universities and research institutes in France, Germany, and Australia.
  • Psychology faculty served on NIH and NIMH grant review panels.
  • Scott Watamaniuk, Ph.D., was named top reviewer in 2008 in Vision Research.
  • Human factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology faculty published 146 publications, including in top tier journals like Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Human Factors.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program conducted a favorable five-year self-study review.
  • An undergraduate student in behavioral neuroscience concentration in psychology was awarded a SMART scholarship.
  • The Department of Psychology hired two new joint Wright State/Air Force Human Resources Laboratory faculty in human factors psychology.
  • Dan Krane, Ph.D., served as an expert witness on the science of DNA profiling in trials in the United States, Europe, and Australia.
  • Research by Kate Excoffon, Ph.D., contributed to the approval of the first gene therapy protocol for human use in Europe to treat the fat-metabolism disorder lipoprotein lipase deficiency.
  • The Biomedical Sciences curriculum was reorganized to better reflect the faculty’s research strengths. By reducing 11 areas of concentration to four more-focused tracks, the curriculum is more effective and efficient.
  • The Department of Biomedical Sciences created an exploratory area of concentration to assess the feasibility of a new track on Biomedical Education.
  • Over the last two academic years, the Lake Campus Dean’s Office awarded more than $70,000 to faculty for research and professional development projects.
  • Chuck Ciampaglio, Ph.D., appeared on the Discovery Channel during Shark Week in 2012 and 2013.
  • Lake Campus students participated in undergraduate research projects, led by Dave Hochstein, Ph.D. (psychology); Martin Kich, Ph.D. (English); Guy Vandegrift, Ph.D. (physics), and Chuck Ciampaglio, Ph.D. (earth and science).
  • G. Thomas Sav, Ph.D., received the 2013 Raj Soin College of Business Outstanding Faculty Scholarship Award.
  • Hee-Young Shin, Ph.D., received the 2013 In-Ho You Commemorative Scholarship Award.
  • Zdravka K. Todorova, Ph.D., received the Outstanding Academic Titles of 2010 by Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries.
  • Rudy H. Fichtenbaum, Ph.D., received the 2010 Sternberg Award from the American Association of University Professors.
  • John P. Blair, Ph.D., received the 2009 Brage Golding Distinguished Professor of Research.
  • Evan W. Osborne, Ph.D., received the 2008 William Fulbright Fellowship Award.
  • Arijit Sengupta, Ph.D., developed a database-driven tool for assessing the learning outcomes of academic programs. It was cited by ABET and AACSB as a best practice and was recommended for further adoption in the university and other academic institutions.
  • James Hamister, Ph.D., and Pratik Parihk, Ph.D., received two research grants from WinWholesale to develop improved methods and tools for product pricing.

Objective B
Enhance Research and Sponsored Programs infrastructure, leading to more external funding.

  • Wright State’s Office of Technology Transfer is fully staffed with the hiring of a director and licensing associate. University researchers/inventors/entrepreneurs (both faculty and staff) were given the opportunity to showcase their innovative and potentially commercializable research at the Office of Technology Transfer’s first Technology Roundtable. Participants presented their ideas to a panel of business and technology leaders and were provided feedback to help push their respective technologies and ideas to the next step in the commercialization process.
  • A director of compliance was hired to oversee research compliance activities, including compliance with federal regulations related to the research enterprise as well as providing training to faculty and staff.
  • The leadership team of the Office of the Vice President for Research and the division directors of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs attend and participate in the monthly meetings of the university’s Research Council to provide guidance and expertise related to research administration.
  • The leadership team of the Office of the Vice President for Research regularly meets with Wright State Research Institute management to foster collaboration and develop strategy.
  • The total revenue received by the university in support of research and educational grants and contracts, including financial aid awards, increased from $61.6 million to $90 million annually over the past five years.
  • The Office of the Vice President for Research and its reporting units are overhauling their websites, structuring them so that potential collaborators find an easy “Pathway to Yes” when searching for key components of the office. Boilerplate agreements, process maps, and Frequently Asked Questions will be easily accessible to partners, both inside and outside the university community.
  • The Boonshoft Center for Genomics Research provides state-of-the-art technical assistance and facilities to support Wright State researchers, as well as industry partners and collaborations with the 711th Human Performance Wing at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.
  • Wright State led an initiative with industry to grow Ohio’s aerospace and defense workforce, capturing $11.4 million in state funding. The Wright State Research Institute worked with its sister institutions to build an aerospace curriculum that links education and training, research, technology commercialization, and job creation.
  • The National Institutes of Health awarded Thomas L. Brown, Ph.D., a grant of more than $1.5 million to investigate preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related disorders leading to premature births.
  • The university contracted with Hanover Research for proposal development services, successfully linking potential investigators with grant-writing specialists.
  • Wright State and nine partners received a $3.8 million award from the Ohio Department of Education to establish a center to conduct education research.
  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs implemented an integrated database solution to handle pre-award and research compliance functions. It enables the office to automate the proposal routing process, streamline electronic proposal submission to the federal government, provide more efficient interaction with the research compliance committees, and effectively search for funding opportunities.  
  • The National Institutes of Health awarded Madhavi Kadakia, Ph.D., a grant of more than $1.3 million to investigate non-melanoma skin cancer.
  • The National Institutes of Health awarded Michael Leffak, Ph.D., a $1.45 million grant to identify genes that regulate the inheritance and progression of human neurodegenerative disorders.
  • The Department of Environmental Health and Safety was granted renewal of the university’s radioactive materials use license, fulfilling required major revisions and updates to the program.
  • College of Engineering and Computer Science research proposals and funding have grown at historically high levels.
  • Research and Sponsored Programs and the College of Education and Human Services sponsored a research initiation grant for Jason Fruth, Ph.D., to infuse evidence-based PAX/GBG training in the college’s teacher preparation programs.
  • Research and Sponsored Programs supported CEHS faculty’s work with Hanover Consulting to apply for a federal IES $5 million grant to expand PAX/GBG in 53 classrooms.
  • In 2007, physics grad student Gian Guzman-Verri discovered that a single-layer sheet of silicon can have electronic Dirac cones, a property that has made graphene world-famous and led to the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics. The flat sheet of silicon was named “silicene” in a paper published by Guzman-Verri and his advisor, Lew Yan Voon, Ph.D., in the prestigious Physics Review B.
  • The Department of Psychology hired two new joint Wright State/Air Force Human Resources Laboratory faculty in human factors psychology.

Objective C
Foster discovery at all levels in the educational pipeline (K–16+)

  • Nearly 2,000 high school students from around the United States traveled to Wright State to participate in the National Science Olympiad Tournament, which features science and engineering competitions involving everything from astronomy and fossils to balsa structures and battery-powered vehicles. Leading up to the national tournament, the university hosted two Science Olympiad Invitationals.
  • Communications and Marketing designed a Science Olympiad logo to promote Wright State as host of the 2013 Science Olympiad and produced a video feature about the university that was shown at the national tournament.
  • Summer enrichment courses attracted students in grades K–9 to campus.
  • The Upward Bound precollege program enhanced the academic skills of eighth-, ninth- and 10th-grade students from first-generation college and low-income families.
  • The student organization Black Men on the Move operated a mentoring program at Thurgood Marshall High School in Dayton.
  • Wright State hosted the 2012 Ohio Mathematics Contest for students in grades four through 11.
  • Vibrant student-produced poster sessions for undergraduate and medical student research attracted more than 125 presentations.
  • In 2010, the Boonshoft School of Medicine received $2.1 million from National Institutes of Health to support two innovative programs that prepare students to pursue careers in biomedical science: the STREAMS and GRAD-PREP programs. STREAMS encourages college students who are members of underrepresented minority groups and students with disabilities to choose careers in cardiovascular-related research. GRAD-PREP provides research and academic training in the biomedical/behavioral sciences for post-baccalaureate students from underrepresented groups and those with disabilities who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree.
  • Communications and Marketing produced the initial promotion of the Dayton Regional STEM School.
  • The Department of Physics supported experiential programs like the Air Force Research Laboratory Discover Lab, where students participate in collaborative teams from academia, government labs, and industry.
  • The Lake Campus engineering program worked with area schools in “Project Lead the Way.”
  • Cheryl Meyer, Ph.D., directed students who are teaching lifespan development to women serving life sentences at the Ohio Reformatory for Women.
  • The Wright State Research Institute supported the Wright Scholar Program as well as Discovery Lab that provides paid and unpaid internships for high school students conducting summer research with Air Force Research Lab mentors

GOAL 4

COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION

Provide leadership to promote and support social, cultural and economic development within the region through our collaborations with local, state, national and global partners.

Objective A
Increase the opportunities within the curriculum for community engagement.

  • For the last four years, Wright State has been named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for its support of volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. The university is listed on the Honor Roll with Distinction for its strong institutional commitment to service and campus-community partnerships that produce measurable results for the region.
  • During the 2011–12 academic year (the last year for which numbers currently are available), 5,999 Wright State University students completed service-learning projects in the community.
  • The Office of Student Activities created “Take Flight,” a leadership retreat in which students learn how to become effective social and community leaders.
  • The Robert and Elaine Stein Art Galleries offered a robust schedule of exhibitions of contemporary art as well as a permanent collection.
  • Service-learning projects have been incorporated into 60 service-learning or service-learning-intensive courses.
  • The College of Education and Human Services established formal professional development school relationships with the Dayton Regional STEM School and the Dayton Boys Prep Academy.
  • The College of Nursing and Health added a clinical component to its assessment course.
  • The Department of Environmental Health and Safety staff, working with the American Society of Safety Engineers Kitty Hawk Chapter, created a Wright State student chapter to help students develop professional skills and prepare them for careers in the safety field.
  • The Boonshoft School of Medicine introduced a service-learning requirement in 2008 for first- and second-biennium students.
  • The university offered a “pay it forward” class in which students learn how nonprofits manage resources through fundraising, volunteering, and grant writing.
  • The College of Education and Human Services is a leader in service-learning curriculum, and its students have donated thousands of hours at community organizations and nonprofit agencies, as well as at lower-performing schools in urban and rural district.
  • The College of Nursing and Health offers an International Service Learning option to Tanzania, working and living in Dar es Salaam, where students are immersed in the culture, engaged in daily reflection, and involved in community-based nursing.
  • Since 2011, Army ROTC cadets have coordinated with clubs and students on campus an annual Earth Day Campus Spring Clean-Up, collecting trash from the woods.
  • In 2012, Army ROTC participated in National Recycle Day, obtaining over 1,000 pledges from students, faculty, and staff to recycle.
  • The Pre-Health Program sponsored a clinical panel of local physicians who discussed careers in family medicine.
  • For the past five years, School of Professional Psychology students volunteered at Hospice of Dayton’s Pathways weekend grief camp for children.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs involved faculty, staff, administration, students, alumni, and community member in a $25 million bond sale.
  • An Engaged Citizenship Studies Certificate and a Youth and Community Engagement Minor were created.
  • Lake Campus held three Regional Summits with a fourth, “For the Health of It,” planned for February 28, 2014.
  • The Business Enterprise Center at Lake Campus engaged with organizations and employers to match curriculum with regional needs.
  • Lake Campus led regional workforce development efforts to attract, retain, and educate qualified students to meet the needs of the manufacturing sector in the region.
  • Lake Campus assisted with the Mercer County Economic Development Office’s career website, Hometown Opportunities.
  • Environmental Health and Safety participated in the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership Program as a panel participant with an Arabian Gulf delegation focused on public wellness programs.

Objective B
Enhance the university’s presence with the Dayton/West Central Ohio regions, and beyond, in ways that benefit communities.

  • A program designed to provide college scholarships over 10 years for up to 500 academically promising local high school students from low-income families was launched by Wright State and Sinclair Community College. Wright State will provide financial support from privately raised funds for 20 students a year, beginning in 2017.
  • The Wingerd Dog Park, the country’s first service dog facility on a college campus, was constructed. The park received a President’s Award for Innovation.
  • Students spent spring break participating in service projects in rural Appalachian communities near Athens, Ohio, assisting low- or fixed-income seniors and people with disabilities.
  • The vice president for multicultural affairs and community engagement in collaboration with the Wright State Foundation created a Social Entrepreneurship Fund to support the implementation of creative, paradigm-shifting ideas to address some of our communities’ most significant needs.
  • Staffers from The Guardian made a relief trip to Joplin, Missouri, after it was ravaged by a massive tornado.
  • The National Center for Medical Readiness Tactical Laboratory was selected as the alternate site for the state of Ohio’s state emergency operations center.
  • Wright State embedded a faculty member in the Mound Laser & Photonics Center, Inc., as part of an agreement to speed the commercialization of research and overcome roadblocks that often keep businesses and universities from working closely together.
  • The Wright State Research Institute supports the state’s Unmanned Aerial Systems initiatives, and Calamityville is one of six sites in the Ohio/Indiana UAS Center and Test Complex.
  • Greek organizations gave 5,136 hours of community service in 2010–11.
  • More than 15 College of Liberal Arts faculty members collaborate each year with the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, serving on committees and as first readers of nominated fiction and nonfiction works, and organizing campus readings and panels.
  • The School of Professional Psychology partnered with Wright-Dunbar Neighborhood for community transformation in Dayton through collaborative research measures.
  • One hundred faculty and students from the Departments of Music and Theatre, Dance, and Motion Pictures collaborated with the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra to mount Leonard Bernstein’s MASS: A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players, and Dancers.
  • Staff members created We Serve U, an organization that encourages staff, faculty, and students to donate their time and skills to engage in significant community service opportunities. In its first year, We Serve U hosted events to benefit Hospice of Dayton, Ronald McDonald House, Westwood PreK–8 School, Saville Elementary School, Blue Star Mothers, Relay for Life, and March of Dimes.
  • Graduate students in the Public History Program created an Open the Toybox exhibit at the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery featuring homemade heirlooms, hand-painted antiques, and mass-produced icons.
  • Student organizations were recognized by the Community Blood Center as Silver Partners for the Lifesaving Ambassador’s Club for hosting eight blood drives on campus in a year
  • The Center for Urban and Public Affairs is a valued resource in the region and state for its research on workforce and economic development, education, community development, housing, and health.
  • More than 160 STEM teachers from 77 schools participated in the College of Science and Mathematics’ “Lesson Study” model.
  • Biology professor Don Cipollini, Ph.D., gave public talks on invasive species to arboretums and the Ohio State University Extension.
  • Accountancy master’s students used their auditing skills to help Huber Heights schools gauge the effectiveness of several programs.
  • Student Anthony Powers’ art show “Why Are the Walls Screaming” was on display at the Yellow Springs Arts Gallery.
  • The Rainbow Alliance raised $8,000 for AIDS Resource Center through its Drag Revue.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business served as the lead center for a nine-county region of the Small Business Development Center in Ohio, providing business management and education services, as well as establishing the International Trade Assistance Center for small businesses seeking interested in pursuing import/export opportunities.
  • The College of Education and Human Services established professional development school agreements with two regional schools to address issues and foster improvements for K–12 schools and teacher candidates.
  • Three major events held at the Nutter Center, the Air Force Marathon, the Jehovah’s Witnesses Conference, and Winterguard International, had a $41 million impact on the local economy.
  • In 2012, Hunt Brown received the Faculty Award for Excellence in Service Learning and Civic Engagement for the course Environmental and Social Sustainability in Appalachia.
  • Since 2011, Army ROTC cadets have visited with and brought gifts to children at Dayton Children’s Hospital.
  • The University Honors Program sponsored several innovative service-learning courses including alternative spring break service trips to New Orleans and Appalachia/Southwestern Ohio.
  • The College Readiness program assisted community schools with increasing students’ educational access, opportunities, and readiness, providing a successful transition to college. This project promotes Wright State’s position as an innovative community-engaged institution by partnering with other community and state organizations.
  • Wright State partnered with Springfield City Schools, St. Marys Memorial High School, Jefferson Township Local Schools, Fairborn High School, and Dayton Public Schools.
  • The College of Education and Human Services awarded 16 mini-grants in 2011–12 to support faculty involvement in partnership efforts.
  • A high-fidelity simulator provided training to Kindred Hospital–Dayton staff and clinical experience to Wright State nursing students.
  • Wright State On the Road, which featured President David R. Hopkins visiting alumni and friends in various Raider Country settings, was successfully promoted by Communications and Marketing and Alumni Relations.
  • A “This is Raider Country” logo and campaign was designed and implemented.
  • Environmental Health and Safety received Ohio EPA Water and Wastewater Continuing Education Provider status for its Understanding the Hazard Communication Standard and Laboratory Safety training programs.
  • James Amon, Ph.D., received the Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce Environmental Service Award for his work preserving and restoring wetlands with the Beaver Creek Wetlands Association. He also consulted with zoning boards and other entities about local wetlands and wetlands restoration in Costa Rica, and served as editor of The Spotted Turtle, a newsletter for Beaver Creek Wetland Association.
  • The Dayton Regional STEM School moved from Beavercreek to a permanent building in Kettering.
  • Raider Road was constructed, connecting University Boulevard with Kauffman Road between the Wright State Physicians building and the Rinzler Student Sports Complex.
  • The Wright State Physicians building opened, offering an array of care, including neurology, sports medicine orthopedics, family medicine, geriatrics, and dermatology.
  • St. John Bosco Chapel, the new home of the Catholic Campus Ministry, was constructed on campus.
  • The Wright State University Foundation served as the financial backer for the Dayton Regional STEM School, Wright State Physicians, and Miami Valley Research Park Foundation, helping to secure financing for capital projects.
  • Wright State started the first alumni network/society to engage alumni and raise money for scholarships. The group includes the African American Alumni Society, Nonprofit Leadership Alliance, Washington, D.C., Alumni Network, Boonshoft School of Medicine Alumni Society, Greater Cleveland Alumni Network, Greater Cincinnati Alumni Network, Greater Columbus Alumni Network, Greater Dayton Alumni Network, Greater New York City Alumni Network, Indianapolis Alumni Network, International Alumni, Lake Campus Alumni Network, Tampa Alumni Network, Social Work Alumni Society, and Student Alumni Association.
  • The Advancement Division engaged alumni and friends in events like ArtsGala, Heritage Society, and the Katharine Wright Legacy Society.
  • The Boonshoft School of Medicine’s Center for Interventions, Treatment, and Addictions Research collaborated with area school districts on the Dayton Area Drug Survey, which provides estimates of non-medical drug use by school-aged teenagers in the Dayton area.
  • In 2012, Larry Lawhorne, M.D., began a geriatric study of the Patient-Centered Medical Home for People Living with Dementia, providing 30 households with access to both electronic health records and an interdisciplinary team for medical care.
  • The Center for Interventions, Treatment, and Addictions Research continued to advance the scientific understanding of substance abuse and its treatment through a wide array of programs including Weekend Intervention Program; Substance Abuse Resources and Disability Issues and Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Drugs and Disability; the Opioid Use Trajectories and HIV Risk Among Young Adults in Ohio study; and the Wright Health Study.
  • The Boonshoft School of Medicine partnered with Reach Out to provide medical care to Montgomery County’s poor and uninsured.
  • In an effort to expand substance abuse care in Ohio, the Boonshoft School of Medicine partnered with the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services to expand technology-assisted care to people with disabilities or mental illness and their families.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs collaborated with the Ohio Department of Transportation and the Cities of Fairborn and Beavercreek to centrally locate road salt storage.
  • The university engaged in a dialogue with Central State University, Cedarville University, Clark State Community College, Cleveland State University, and the University of Virginia about Wright State’s recycling program, green floor care program, hospital grade disinfect general cleaning program, and training materials.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs helped prepare campus for the 2013 Science Olympiad National Tournament, including preparing pedestrian way finding and signage.
  • The College of Education and Human Services positively affected the region by preparing excellent educators, leaders, and human services professionals. New programs, including Youth and Community Engagement, Community Health, and Emergency Management, have expanded the traditional reach of education, leadership, and human services programs. 
  • The College of Education and Human Services partnered with high-need community organizations, schools, and neighborhoods, including the Initiatives in Rural and Urban Education program, science education outreach in the rural communities, and partnerships with community mental health and recovery boards. 
  • The College of Education and Human Services participates in the National Network for Educational Renewal and with the Educator Preparation Advisory Council.
  • The College of Education and Human Services established professional development school agreements with a number of school settings to enhance educator preparation and K–12 student achievement.
  • College of Education and Human Services Dean Charlotte Harris, Ph.D., participated in the monthly meetings of the State University Education Deans and in 2013 became the organization’s chair. She also participated in the Ohio Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Day on the Square, meeting with Ohio legislators.
  • The Educational Resource Center is home to the Dayton Holocaust Resource Center, the region’s largest collection of Holocaust and modern genocide-related materials.
  • Communications and Marketing is involved in the planning and execution of the Wright State Regional Summits, which encourage and enable conversation between the university and the region regarding economic development.
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology faculty present at international venues: Michael Leffak, Ph.D., and Yong-jie Xu, Ph.D., presented at the Cold Springs Harbor for the Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Genome Maintenance; Leffak presented at an EMBO Conference Series on Nuclear Structure and Dynamics in France; Madhavi Kadakia, Ph.D., presented and chaired a session at the International p63/p73 workshop in Japan, and at the University of Mumbai; and Julian Gomez-Cambronero, Ph.D., presented at the International Symposium on Biological Regulation and Enzyme Activity in Normal and Neoplastic Tissues in Bologna, Italy, and at the Center de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa and University of Madrid.
  • The Clinical Lab Science program was the only four-year program in the region for training students, meeting a critical need for area hospitals.
  • The Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement partnered with 12 pre-K–8 schools and seven after-school programs in racially and ethnically diverse low-income neighborhoods to increase students’ academic achievement.
  • Students in the foundation course for the certificate in Engaged Citizenship Studies were placed in organizations throughout area communities to meet needs identified by those communities and organizations.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business designed a three-day residential program the Professional Business Institute, for 25 area high school students to enhance college readiness and business skills in the region.
  • The Center for Economic Education and Financial Literacy held the K–12 Teachers Academy for Financial Literacy.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business conducted financial literacy projects with low- to moderate-income schools in Dayton.
  • The Young Business Scholars Program was held annually for Dayton Early College Academy students.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business created collaboration with universities in Turkey, China, Panama, and India.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business signed memorandums of understanding with Shanghai Finance University to create a 2+2+1 program for undergraduate programs and with Shandong Province for an executive M.B.A. program.
  • Through the Organizational Effectiveness Lecture Series and its predecessor, the Human Resource Lecture Series, Human Resources provided successful lectures for human resource management professionals in the Miami Valley.
  • During a trip to New York, Finance Club students helped victims of Hurricane Sandy.
  • The International Business program conducted annual study-abroad programs to France and Japan in collaboration with local and international businesses.
  • The International Business program continued its international business exchange programs and developed new programs in France, Chile, Germany, and China.
  • School of Professional Psychology practicum students provided over 45,000 hours of clinical services a year to agencies in Dayton, Cincinnati, and Columbus.
  • In 2013, the Montgomery County Commission appointed Mary Ann Drewry, executive director of the Ellis Institute, to the Montgomery County Family and Children’s Service Board.

Objective C
Offer degree and other education programs consistent with regional and state needs.

  • The Department of Computer Science and Engineering offered Ohio’s first Master of Science in Cyber Security, providing students the knowledge and skills needed to protect computer systems and computer networks.
  • The College of Engineering and Computer Science received a $1.3 million grant from the State of Ohio that was paired with matching funds from 30 area businesses to create new internship opportunities for students in STEM fields.
  • Students taking Philanthropy as Citizenship awarded mini-grants to the House of Bread, the Linda Vista Project, and the Children’s Hunger Alliance.
  • The Aerospace Professional Development Center worked closely with the aerospace and defense industry and government, higher education institutions around Ohio, and on STEM initiatives in the Dayton region to offer career coaching, match employees with job openings, identify skills gaps in the workforce, and assist students in finding internships.
  • The new Master of Social Work program admitted its first students in Fall 2012. It was created to respond to a community need for more social workers with advanced degrees.
  • The College of Education and Human Services initiated the new Instructional Design for Online Learning certificate program.
  • The R.N.-to-B.S.N. program was created in response to community needs.
  • Lake Campus, along with the Dayton Campus, received an Ohio Means Internships and Co-Ops grant to assist local and regional companies and businesses to invest in our students.
  • The College of Liberal Arts’ STEAM3 program trains future educators to use art and music to teach science. Students work with K–12 master teachers to deliver their lesson plans in local classrooms.
  • In conjunction with the American Association of University Women, the Women’s Center developed Running Start, a seminar that teaches female students how to successfully campaign for student government positions.
  • The Boonshoft School of Medicine Center for Global Health worked to improve the quality, efficiency, and access to health care in the local community while helping develop national models through its Global Health Systems Program.
  • In 2012, Wright State and the Dayton VA Medical Center partnered to provide graduate medical education to nearly 160 residents and fellows, including 59 active duty military personnel.
  • In 2009, the Boonshoft School of Medicine created the new Division of Tactical Emergency Medicine, which is part of the school’s Department of Emergency Medicine.
  • Capstone projects in Information Systems and Supply Chain Management undergraduate and graduate programs led to economic development opportunities in the region.
  • To prepare students for informed, engaged participation in our democratic society, the Engaged Citizenship Studies Certificate was created and opened to students in all majors.
  • Julie Gentile, M.D., served as project director for two grant-funded statewide projects: Ohio’s Coordinating Center of Excellence in Mental Illness/Intellectual Disability, which provides educational programs, comprehensive psychiatric assessments to patients with mental illness and intellectual disability, and Dual Diagnosis Intervention Teams in 55 counties; and Ohio’s Telepsychiatry Project for Intellectual Disability, which serves low-income individuals with mental illness/intellectual disability in 75 counties. In 2009, Gentile received the National Association for the Dually Diagnosed Award for Clinical Practice, and in 2010, she received the American Psychiatric Association’s Frank J. Menolascino Award for her work with patients with developmental disabilities.
  • In 2009, the Boonshoft School of Medicine and Fairborn broke ground on the National Center for Medical Readiness Tactical Laboratory at Calamityville.
  • Through its new minor in Emergency Management, the Department of Kinesiology and Health partnered with National Center for Medical Readiness at Calamityville.
  • The College of Nursing and Health partnered with the VA to develop and operate a psych/mental health nurse practitioner program.
  • The College of Education and Human Services addressed high-needs areas in the community with off-site programs and other initiatives, including the Science and Math Teacher Imperative, which seeks to increase the number of highly qualified and diverse science and math teachers in the U.S., and the intervention specialist teacher cohorts in Washington Court House and Celina.
  • Many course offerings and programs are going online in response to the call for easier access and more flexibility. New programs have been added each year to address specific community needs. 
  • The College of Nursing and Health collaborated with the National Center for Medical Readiness to develop the country’s first flight/disaster nursing certificate.
  • The Department of Physics established a dual-course enrollment for the college physics sequence with the Dayton Regional STEM School.
  • The Biomedical Sciences Program re-implemented and revitalized the M.D./Ph.D. Dual Degree Program.
  • The Youth and Community Engagement minor was created through a collaboration among the College of Education and Human Services, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement to improve the academic achievement of students in urban schools by attracting more students into urban education as a career field, by better preparing teacher education majors for work in urban settings, and by promoting a sense of civic responsibility among K–16 students.
  • Wright State conducted environmental scan market studies and competitive and geo-demographic analysis to ensure the university is meeting supply and demand.
  • Accounting students consistently achieved the top three CPA examination pass rates among public universities in Ohio.
  • The finance major became a recognized program within the CFA Institute.
  • The Raj Soin College of Business created an investments concentration at the M.B.A. level, meeting needs of graduate students sitting for CFA exams and interesting in working in the investments arena.
  • The Human Resources program prepared approximately 200 working professionals to take the Society of Human Resources Professional and Senior Professional Human Resource Management Certification examination.
  • The School of Professional Psychology provided continuing education programs to meet the professional development needs of Wright State and community mental health professionals.

GOAL 5

VALUED RESOURCES

Develop and sustain the human, financial and physical resources required to accomplish the university’s strategic goals.

Objective A
Encourage and support the professional development and wellness of faculty and staff.

  • Wright State’s Research Council conducts an annual internal funding competition providing the opportunity for faculty to garner support for pursuit of scholarly activities related to their professional development goals. 
  • The Leadership Academy provides staff with the tools necessary to improve performance.
  • Human Resources organizes an annual Health and Benefits Fair for all Wright State employees. The fair includes free blood pressure and cholesterol screenings, flu shots, and presentations by retirement providers.
  • In 2012, Wright State Physicians opened its new building on campus, providing a convenient place for students, faculty, and staff, as well as residents of Clark, Montgomery, and Greene Counties, to receive medical care.
  • Each year, President David R. Hopkins honors outstanding faculty, staff, and units with Presidential Awards for Excellence.
  • Human Resources developed PeopleAdmin, single portal online entry for all Wright State faculty and staff positions.
  • A leader in working on wellness initiatives for faculty and staff, the College of Nursing and Health plans to offer weekly physical activities and other initiatives.
  • Human Resources provides a variety of personal and professional development training to faculty and staff, including sexual harassment, preventing workplace violence, and new supervisor trainings.
  • Human Resources hired a new health care benefits consultant and is developing a robust wellness program in cooperation with faculty and staff constituent groups.
  • A short-term disability program was added to the university’s benefit portfolio.
  • Emergency Management and Communications and Marketing developed a Crisis Communications Plan for the university.
  • Communications and Marketing developed a poster series to communicate H1N1 information to the campus community.
  • Training programs conducted by Environmental Health and Safety resulted in a 70 percent increase in safety training offerings provided to on-campus personnel from 2008 to 2012.
  • Environmental Health and Safety implemented fall protection measures at areas on campus where fall protection was not designed or was found inadequate.
  • The university implemented a new wellness initiative, garnering 77 percent participation among faculty and staff in the biometric screening process, and recruited the first wellness coordinator.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs led a data-gathering effort to inform a university initiative exploring the restriction of tobacco use on campus.
  • The College of Nursing and Health started an Alumni Association. 
  • The College of Education and Human Services has a long history of funding both faculty and staff professional development, before it became a requirement in the AAUP contract. Over the past five fiscal years, CEHS has provided nearly $600,000.
  • Communications and Marketing staff actively supports the Adventure Summit communications, produced in partnership with Five Rivers MetroParks.
  • Christopher Wyatt, Ph.D., won the President’s Award for Early Career Achievement.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology houses the Confocal and Microscopy core facility, a vital university resource.
  • An Army ROTC Cadre member attended the U.S. Army Military History Instructor Course, which provides an alternative for students to meet a Military Science Department requirement without cost to the university.
  • Each spring term, Finance and Financial Services students and faculty mentors create comprehensive financial plans for selected faculty and staff as part of the award-winning practicum for financial services senior students.
  • School of Professional Psychology faculty members Robert Rando, Ph.D., and Julie Williams, Psy.D., obtained Fellow status, bringing to nine the number of SOPP faculty who have the Diplomate in Psychology.
  • Janeece Warfield, Psy.D., participated in the American Psychology’s Leadership Institute for Women in Psychology in 2012–13.
  • Counseling and Wellness Services received the 2012 President’s Award for Excellence for an Outstanding Unit.
  • In 2013, Kimberly Hudson received the President’s Award for Excellence in Leadership Classified for serving as a role model among her peers in fiduciary and diversity-related matters.
  • The president’s cabinet reviewed and revised the performance appraisal process to improve compliance and better align the process with institutional values.

Objective B
Enhance fiscal and operational management.

  • In 2010, Wright State was awarded more than $118,000 in rebates from Dayton Power and Light for its installation of energy-efficient lighting and heating/air conditioning equipment. The upgrades save the university an estimated $45,000 annually.
  • Budget reductions in FY 2012—which were shared by every unit on campus—were softened by a planned $2.1 million increased return on the university’s financial investment portfolio and record enrollment of nearly 20,000 students.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs kicked off or completed numerous construction projects, including NEC Building, RaiderConnect, Creative Arts Center renovation, Woods Commons, Student Success Center and Classroom Building, Dunbar Library Circulation, and Nischwitz Stadium Press Box.
  • Aggressive bidding by Human Resources lowered insurance costs significantly.
  • The School of Professional Psychology achieved a balanced budget by 2012–13.
  • A campus-wide energy conservation project has annually saved $950,000 in electricity on campus and $110,000 for natural gas.
  • Environmental Health and Safety oversaw a campus-wide chemical inventory process to provide a safe work environment and to comply with applicable OSHA rules.
  • Safety awareness of university employees, provided through the efforts of Environmental Health and Safety, led to a nearly 50 percent reduction in workers’ compensation claims over five years, decreasing workers’ compensation costs by $327,000.
  • Environmental Health and Safety instituted an “orphan chemical” recycling program, helping labs recycle unwanted chemicals and saving $2,500 in chemical disposal costs.
  • Wright State is considered a “gold standard” university after 50 percent of faculty, staff, and retirees participated in the Campus Scholarship and Innovation Campaign, raising more than $1.8 million.
  • By combining investments in the Wright State Foundation portfolio, the Wright State University Foundation, the Lake Campus Board, the Western Ohio Education Fund, and the Wright State University Alumni Association provided a greater scope of investment potential then they might otherwise realize.
  • Since July 1, 2008, 242 new scholarships were funded through the efforts led by the Advancement Division.
  • ArtsGala generated $485,000 for scholarships for Wright State’s fine and performing arts students.
  • The Boonshoft School of Medicine and the Miami Valley Hospital formed the Wright State University & Premier Health Partners Neuroscience Institute with a $4.35 million gift from the Miami Valley Hospital.
  • Since 2008, the Wright State Foundation Board of Trustees Scholarship Fund has raised more than $67,000. In fiscal year 2011, 40 scholarships were awarded.
  • With gifts starting at $10,000, the Wright State Heritage Society inductees reached a total of 1,698 members.
  • Purchasing saved more than $875,000 through strategic sourcing and negotiations with seven vendors, from office supplies and scientific lab supplies to furniture repurposing and express prescription plans. Purchasing also worked with Ohio’s Inter-University Council Purchasing Group to save $1.4 million.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs emphasized shared service partnership approaches, including a new salt barn and enterprise printer services.
  • A new hospitality services provider was brought to campus to enhance the dining experience across campus while increasing revenue and generating support for campus programs.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs led the development and implementation of a cell phone stipend policy that saved $100,000 annually.
  • The university contracted with ABM to implement a $25.5 million energy-performance contract, expected to reduce campus energy consumption by nearly 40 percent.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs implemented a “shut the sash” program, leading to $50,000 in energy savings.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs launched online leave reporting, significantly reducing paper consumption, processing time, and data entry errors.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs negotiated with United Health Care for student insurance rates resulting in $100,000 in savings for FY13.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs developed the eDPO system to eliminate a paper-based system.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs encouraged pro-card use, resulting in the rebate of approximately $250,000.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs managed a quick and successful resolution of a major water leak at the Nutter Center.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs upgraded to a hospital-grade cleaning program, while reducing chemical costs, which was featured in College Planning and Management magazine.
  • • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs restructured custodial floor care schedules to a four-day workweek, nearly eliminating overtime costs.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs developed a Capital Projects Wright Way Policy, roles and responsibilities outline, and process maps to encourage consistency, transparency, and engagement of all stakeholders.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs led the development of the 2014–15 SSI model, translating into a more favorable formula in support of Wright State’s mission.
  • The university secured Moody’s A1 rating in October 2012, leading to two successful debt issuances in FY13.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs launched an enhanced investment management model to further manage risk and optimize returns.
  • The Office of Business and Fiscal Affairs developed a division-wide appreciative inquiry process to facilitate the reorganization of its division.
  • Communications and Marketing introduced a new project management software system, Quickbase, in 2012 to combine all project tracking into one database.
  • In 2011 and 2012, Purchasing and Communications and Marketing purchased high-end printing from one vendor to save overall printing costs.
  • Communications and Marketing absorbed photography and video production staff and functions when the Center for Teaching and Learning was reorganized.
  • Communications and Marketing invested heavily in developing a content management system for university websites, saving funds by reducing redundancy of both the technology and the technical expertise needed to implement complex web solutions.
  • The Lake Campus is the only Ohio regional campus that has its own foundation, the Western Ohio Educational Foundation.
  • The Western Ohio Educational Foundation built Lake Campus’ fully occupied campus housing facility, and a second unit is under construction. Each unit will house approximately 32 students.
  • The Western Ohio Educational Foundation provides over $250,000 in scholarships every year to Lake Campus students.
  • Lake Campus staff and faculty worked collectively with local, state, and federal governments and industry and agricultural partners to organize and execute strategic actions that focus on environmental, economic, and policy issues related to both Grand Lake St. Marys and agricultural practices affecting the watershed.
  • Finance and Financial Services faculty helped select underwriters for Wright State University’s $25 million bond sale.

Objective C
Generate increased revenue.

  • Created in 2008, the Institute of Defense Studies and Education provides educational programs using best practices relevant to the U.S. Department of Defense, including certificate programs in Supply Chain Management, Psychology of Terrorism, and Cyber Security.
  • The Boonshoft School of Medicine’s revenue grew 7 percent in FY09.
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology faculty received Department of Defense and National Science Foundation funding to purchase DNA sequencers capable of sequencing a person’s genome.
  • The Nursing Institute is working on several new revenue-generating facets, including a nurses aid training program.
  • Ohio’s Third Frontier Research and Development Center Attraction Program supported up to $5 million in matching funds for the Human Performance Consortium, focused on advancing human performance technologies through research, development, training, and commercialization.
  • A 2008 economic impact study commissioned by the Ohio Council of Medical Deans found that the Boonshoft School of Medicine, its medical student education and research enterprise, Wright State Physicians, and the resident training and research enterprise of its affiliated hospitals contributed $850.5 million to the state's economy and generated $24 million in state government revenue, while supporting 13,334 jobs.
  • The College of Education and Human Services created program coordinator positions to enhance tuition revenue by recruiting students in the Miami Valley.
  • The College of Education and Human Services partnered with area school districts to provide programs in high-need areas such as intervention specialist, reading, and principal licensure.
  • In 2011, the College of Education and Human Services operationalized a fundraising plan, which includes initiatives to increase alumni and other donor gifts and expands existing marketing plans.
  • The Nursing Institute of West Central Ohio runs the Living Laboratory at Graceworks Lutheran Services, training health care professionals using the latest simulation technology.
  • SmugMug was introduced as a new photography management system, making it easier to view and order Communications and Marketing event and individual photos online.
  • The Ellis Institute increased its clinical revenue by 74 percent.

Objective D
Increase investments in facilities/technologies to achieve strategic goals.

  • The Neuroscience Engineering Collaboration Building, which is expected to be completed in 2015, will serve as a collaborative research location for Wright State’s neuroscience and engineering departments. 
  • Construction of residential apartments began at the Lake Campus.
  • The Wright State Research Institute boasts unique facilities and technologies such as the Appenzellar Visualization Lab, the Analyst Test Bed, and the Vigilant Spirit Mobile Test and Evaluation Center.
  • In 2008, the Boonshoft School of Medicine unveiled the Gandhi Medical Education Center in White Hall, featuring more than 84,000 square feet of lecture halls, classrooms, laboratories, and computer labs devoted to the specialized training of tomorrow’s finest medical professionals.
  • The Matthew O. Diggs III Laboratory for Life Science Research received a Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council. The Diggs Lab was the first laboratory in Ohio to receive the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-NC Gold status.
  • Department of Biological Sciences faculty and students modified the university’s long-range plan to better protect the campus woods.
  • An unattractive area in the Woods Residential Complex was transformed into a park-like setting for student programming.
  • The university supplemented a $100,000 external grant to create the country’s first service dog facility on a college campus.
  • The College of Nursing and Health invested in high-fidelity mannequins to serve as simulators for students’ clinical experiences.
  • The university completed a $1.2 million renovation project that improved the Dining Services kitchen, serving line, dining room, and student services areas at Lake Campus.
  • The university awarded a contract replacing all multifunctional copiers on campus from university owned to contractor owned, resulting in a more efficient and cost-effective program and saving approximately $100,000 a year.
  • Facilities Planning and Development led an effort of classroom and laboratory new construction or renovations on both campuses in recent years, including Diggs Lab, Rike Hall, White Hall, the Benjamin and Marian Schuster Hall, Russ Engineering, Joshi Research Center, Oelman Hall, Cox Medical Simulation in Kettering, the Charles and Renate Frydman Educational Resource Center, and the Virginia Hamilton and Arnold Adoff Resources Center in Millett Hall, along with new classrooms and science laboratories for Lake Campus.
  • Facilities Planning and Development constructed and renovated facilities like the Rinzler Student Sports Complex, Lake Campus dining facility, and new lights on the women’s softball field, artificial turf for the Alumni Soccer and Mulhollan Recreation fields, and the campus food pantry.
  • The College of Nursing and Health collaborated with the National Center for Medical Readiness to develop the country’s first flight/disaster nursing certificate.
  • The Purchasing Department improved efficiency in the ordering process through the WrightBuy E-Procurement system.
  • A new display system for posters across campus was created by Communications and Marketing to eliminate posters on easels that were an obstruction to people with disabilities.
  • Wright State websites are now created in Drupal, a content management system that enables webpages to be scalable to just about any device.
  • Human Resources began using PeopleAdmin as a single port of entry for all faculty and staff positions.
  • Communications and Marketing purchased a new Canon proofing press, which gives university clients color-perfect proofs of their publications, while also allowing C&M to print low quantities of publications for campus clients.
  • Communications and Marketing produces content for the Four Winds displays at the entrance to the Student Union to welcome visitors to campus.
  • The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences secured the donation of $10 million in software from Schlumberger Limited, allowing students to work with industry-standard software and giving them a competitive edge for jobs in energy exploration and environmental engineering.
  • Communications and Marketing introduced a new project management software system, Quickbase, in 2012 to combine all project tracking into one database.
  • The Pre-Health Program website was created to provide valuable information for students pursuing careers in health care and opportunities for networking.
  • The Department of Psychology increased its grant funding from $1 million to $3 million.
  • Both the Ellis Institute and the School of Professional Psychology’s Health Sciences Building were renovated in the Summer 2013, creating a more inviting atmosphere for students, faculty, clients, and visitors.
  • The School of Professional Psychology upgraded the electronic classroom technology in the Health Sciences Building and at the Ellis Institute.
  • The School of Professional Psychology digitized the Clinical Training clinical hour tracking system.