GOAL 1

ACADEMIC DISTINCTIVENESS AND QUALITY

Enhance our distinctive learning experience to produce talented graduates with the knowledge and skills essential for critical thinking, meaningful civic engagement, international competency, an appreciation for the arts, lifelong learning and the ability to lead and adapt in a rapidly changing world.

Objective A
Ensure the alignment of General Education, the major, assessment, undergraduate and graduate program review, and co-curricular activities with the above goal.

  • The Department of Physics created the Core General Education course The Physics of How Things Work.
  • Biomedical Sciences faculty have published approximately 200 research papers and received $10–27 million in research funding. 
  • The Biomedical Sciences Program awarded 41 doctorates from 2007 to 2012. Graduates have followed highly successful yet divergent career paths, including postdoctoral fellows/associates at university, medical, and veterinary schools; research scientists in industry or government; practicing physicians/residents; and faculty members in academic settings.
  • The Department of Biomedical Sciences created an exploratory area of concentration to assess the feasibility of a new track on Biomedical Education.
  • Raj Soin College of Business began promoting its minor programs to students in the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Science and Mathematics.

Objective B
Diversify and enrich academic and professional programs, including non-degree.

  • Wright State was awarded a five-year, $2.86 million National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant to increase the representation of women in STEM fields in the region.
  • The Department of Neuroscience and Physiology developed an Anatomy Teaching track to meet demand for teachers of anatomy.
  • The Pre-Health Program created the public health minor to provide an understanding of community health and different career opportunities.
  • The university signed a memorandum of understanding with Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an University of Arts and Science, and Xi’an University of Finance and Economics in China.
  • Five tenure-track faculty (Melissa Schen, Ph.D., Jeff Peters, Ph.D., Volker Bahn, Ph.D., Lynn Hartzler, Ph.D., and Kate Excoffon, Ph.D.) joined the Department of Biological Sciences, and three others (Labib Rouhana, Ph.D., Shulin Ju, Ph.D., and Quan Zhong, Ph.D.) were hired in 2013.
  • Biomedical Sciences faculty come from 18 different departments, three colleges, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.
  • The Pre-Health Program developed the MCAT Prep Course to assist students in need and implemented the Post-Bac Certificate for returning/career-changing students.
  • The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences implemented a low-residency program leading the Master of Science Teaching (Earth Science) degree.
  • Female physics students participated in the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • The Department of Physics developed the Interdisciplinary Applied Sciences and Mathematics Ph.D. Program to address additional synergistic research and educational collaborations in the Dayton area.

Objective C
Recruit and retain a nationally/internationally recognized diverse, learning centered faculty and staff.

  • The Department of Psychology hired two new joint Wright State/Air Force Human Resources Laboratory faculty in human factors psychology.
  • The College of Science and Mathematics instituted diversity/equity issues training sessions for all search committee chairs.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology hired five tenure-track faculty: Christopher Wyatt, Ph.D., Barbara Kraszpulska, Ph.D., Ashot Kozak, Ph.D., David Ladle, Ph.D., and Sherif Elbasiouny, Ph.D. The department implemented successful mentoring initiatives for its junior faculty relating to NIH grant funding and tenure track progression.
  • Paula Bubulya, Ph.D., served as chair of the Midwest regional RNA Society, and Lynn Hartzler, Ph.D.,  served as president of the Ohio Physiological Society.

Objective D
Enhance the quantity and quality of dialogue with our various communities to ensure our academic relevance and distinctiveness.

  • The Department of Physics established educational collaborations with the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Boonshoft Museum of Discovery, and Dayton Regional STEM School.
  • The Department of Physics collaborated with faculty and students at the Air Force Institute of Technology.
  • The College of Science and Mathematics hosted the first Direct Connect to encourage increased enrollment of direct-admission high school students into the college and demonstrate the university’s commitment to research.

GOAL 2

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Enhance student access to and successful participation in higher education through quality and innovative instruction and student life programs that increase graduation and career placement for a diverse student body.

Objective A
Improve the enrollment and retention of direct-from-high-school, graduate and nontraditional student populations.

  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology expanded its master’s programs in anatomy, physiology, and neuroscience to admit approximately 120 students. 
  • The Physics Graduate Program graduated the most students in Ohio during the 2011–12 academic year.
  • Following the implementation of several recruitment and student success strategies, the number of physics majors increased by 40 percent over the previous four-year average.
  • The university hosted Pathway to Health Professions for high school students intending to study in pre-health fields.
  • The Department of Physics increased from 14 majors in Fall 2007 to 51 majors in Fall 2013.
  • Biological Sciences faculty and students traveled to the rainforests of Peru, Ecuador, and Suriname during Amazon Ecology courses.
  • The Department of Biology had the most students complete departmental honors research on campus.
  • The first-year physics seminar for incoming majors won a Wright State Learning Communities Award and has increased physics majors’ success.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program received more than 65 applications for its Ph.D. program each year, and approximately 75 percent of applicants accepted offers.
  • The Department of Psychology increased its grant funding from $1 million to $3 million.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program conducted a favorable five-year self-study review.

Objective B
Enhance the academic success of students.

  • A physics teaching innovation grant focused on active learning methodologies for students and implementing lesson study for faculty development. 
  • The research group of Ivan Medvedev, Ph.D., was selected to present their research “Diagnostic Chemical Analysis of Exhaled Human Breath using a Novel Terahertz (THz) Spectroscopic Approach” in Washington, D.C., at the Council on Undergraduate Education Posters on the Hill 2013.
  • In Fall 2013, the Department of Physics awarded three $1,000 Undergraduate Research Scholarships to incoming direct-admit students.
  • The Biomedical Sciences Program re-implemented and revitalized the M.D./Ph.D. Dual Degree Program.
  • Carla Benton, a junior physics major, received a 2009 Presidential Commendation for Excellence in Co-curricular Activities and presented her research at the annual Undergraduate Poster Session on the Hill.
  • The Biomedical Sciences curriculum was reorganized to better reflect the faculty’s research strengths. By reducing 11 areas of concentration to four more-focused tracks, the curriculum is more effective and efficient.
  • The number of Wright States students who were accepted into medical school was 10 to 15 percent above the national average.
  • Pre-health student organizations received more than $6,000 in grants.
  • Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology faculty published 146 publications, including in top tier journals like Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Human Factors.
  • In 2011 Zach Gault, an undergraduate physics major, presented at International Optical Terahertz Workshop in Santa Barbara.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program received the Teaching Innovation Grant in 2013.
  • Twenty-four students graduated from the Ph.D. in Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology program.
  • The Psychology Undergraduate Program Office was established in 2007.
  • An undergraduate student in the behavioral neuroscience concentration in psychology was awarded a SMART scholarship.
  • The Department of Physics connected undergraduate students to summer and academic year research opportunities.
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology student Valery Lozada Fernandez won two National ABRCMS Biomedical Research awards for her poster presentation at the National ABRCMS Biomedical Research Conference.
  • Larry Ream, Ph.D., received the Robert J. Kegerreis Distinguished Professor of Teaching Award.

Objective C
Develop effective educational processes to assist students in meeting post-graduate career and educational goals.

  • The B.S. Environmental Health Sciences program includes a mandatory internship, with cooperation from environmental health agencies and industries.
  • The Psychology Undergraduate Program Office was established in 2007.

GOAL 3

RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

Expand our scholarship in innovative and targeted ways to address regional, national and global needs.

Objective A
Build a national and international research reputation

  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology faculty received a prestigious NIH Program Project Grant in Neuroscience.
  • Several serve on national review panels, including Thomas L. Brown, Ph.D., for an NIH study section, and Dawn Wooley, Ph.D., on the distinguished NIH Biosafety Panel.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology expanded its research endeavors by developing collaborative new research areas, including stroke, neuroimmunology, and neurodegeneration.
  • Ten faculty held individual National Institutes of Health or American Heart Association grants. 
  • Research by Chad Hammerschmidt, Ph.D., on the distribution of mercury in the ocean has been supported by National Science Foundation grants, resulting in one of the “Top-50 Most Cited Articles” in the prestigious journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta.
  • The Terahertz Research Cluster collaborated with numerous institutions, including Notre Dame, Virginia Tech, and the Air Force Institute of Technology, and industry partners like Samsung.
  • Wright State, Indiana University, the University of Tennessee, and Redondo Optics Inc., received a three-year $625,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop this new sensor technology with a focus on ultra-high sensitive protein and virus detection.
  • Wright State researchers, in conjunction with the University of Texas at Dallas and Samsung, are developing a disease-detecting exhalation device based on Terahertz Spectroscopy techniques.
  • Jane Fox, Ph.D., served as a scientific co-investigator on the NASA mission Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission.
  • More than 25 percent of physics faculty served on editorial boards of professional journals. 
  • Elliott Brown, Ph.D., a pioneering physicist and engineer from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was named the endowed chair in experimental sensor physics.
  • In 2011, the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology hosted Sir Paul Nurse, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate and president of the Royal Society, for the 2011 Varandani Lecture.
  • In 2012, Dawn Wooley, Ph.D., was selected to serve on the prestigious 21-member Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.
  • The Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology; and Biological Sciences launched a cell signaling cluster to establish a critical mass of biomedical researchers engaged in research examining cell pathways impacting various human diseases.
  • Robert E. W. Fyffe, Ph.D., was named a University Professor and Timothy Cope, Ph.D., received the Brage Golding Distinguished Professor of Research Award.
  • More than half of pre-health students are involved in research or community service.
  • The Department of Psychology co-sponsored the International Symposium on Aviation Psychology with the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Human Effectiveness Directorate in 2007, 2009, and 2011.
  • The Department of Psychology increased its grant funding from $1 million to $3 million.
  • Three psychology faculty members had sabbaticals or summer research fellowships in universities and research institutes in France, Germany, and Australia.
  • Psychology faculty served on NIH and NIMH grant review panels.
  • Scott Watamaniuk, Ph.D., was named top reviewer in 2008 in Vision Research.
  • Human factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology faculty published 146 publications, including in top tier journals like Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Human Factors.
  • The Human Factors and Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program conducted a favorable five-year self-study review.
  • An undergraduate student in behavioral neuroscience concentration in psychology was awarded a SMART scholarship.
  • The Department of Psychology hired two new joint Wright State/Air Force Human Resources Laboratory faculty in human factors psychology.
  • Dan Krane, Ph.D., served as an expert witness on the science of DNA profiling in trials in the United States, Europe, and Australia.
  • Research by Kate Excoffon, Ph.D., contributed to the approval of the first gene therapy protocol for human use in Europe to treat the fat-metabolism disorder lipoprotein lipase deficiency.
  • The Biomedical Sciences curriculum was reorganized to better reflect the faculty’s research strengths. By reducing 11 areas of concentration to four more-focused tracks, the curriculum is more effective and efficient.
  • The Department of Biomedical Sciences created an exploratory area of concentration to assess the feasibility of a new track on Biomedical Education.

Objective B
Enhance Research and Sponsored Programs infrastructure, leading to more external funding.

  • The National Institutes of Health awarded Thomas L. Brown, Ph.D., a grant of more than $1.5 million to investigate preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related disorders leading to premature births.
  • The National Institutes of Health awarded Madhavi Kadakia, Ph.D., a grant of more than $1.3 million to investigate non-melanoma skin cancer.
  • The National Institutes of Health awarded Michael Leffak, Ph.D., a $1.45 million grant to identify genes that regulate the inheritance and progression of human neurodegenerative disorders.
  • In 2007, physics grad student Gian Guzman-Verri discovered that a single-layer sheet of silicon can have electronic Dirac cones, a property that has made graphene world-famous and led to the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics. The flat sheet of silicon was named “silicene” in a paper published by Guzman-Verri and his advisor, Lew Yan Voon, Ph.D., in the prestigious Physics Review B.
  • The Department of Psychology hired two new joint Wright State/Air Force Human Resources Laboratory faculty in human factors psychology.

Objective C
Foster discovery at all levels in the educational pipeline (K–16+)

  • Wright State hosted the 2012 Ohio Mathematics Contest for students in grades four through 11.
  • Vibrant student-produced poster sessions for undergraduate and medical student research attracted more than 125 presentations.
  • The Department of Physics supported experiential programs like the Air Force Research Laboratory Discover Lab, where students participate in collaborative teams from academia, government labs, and industry.

GOAL 4

COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION

Provide leadership to promote and support social, cultural and economic development within the region through our collaborations with local, state, national and global partners.

Objective A
Increase the opportunities within the curriculum for community engagement.

  • The Pre-Health Program sponsored a clinical panel of local physicians who discussed careers in family medicine.

Objective B
Enhance the university’s presence with the Dayton/West Central Ohio regions, and beyond, in ways that benefit communities.

  • More than 160 STEM teachers from 77 schools participated in the College of Science and Mathematics’ “Lesson Study” model.
  • Biology professor Don Cipollini, Ph.D., gave public talks on invasive species to arboretums and the Ohio State University Extension.
  • In 2012, Hunt Brown received the Faculty Award for Excellence in Service Learning and Civic Engagement for the course Environmental and Social Sustainability in Appalachia.
  • James Amon, Ph.D., received the Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce Environmental Service Award for his work preserving and restoring wetlands with the Beaver Creek Wetlands Association. He also consulted with zoning boards and other entities about local wetlands and wetlands restoration in Costa Rica, and served as editor of The Spotted Turtle, a newsletter for Beaver Creek Wetland Association.
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology faculty present at international venues: Michael Leffak, Ph.D., and Yong-jie Xu, Ph.D., presented at the Cold Springs Harbor for the Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Genome Maintenance; Leffak presented at an EMBO Conference Series on Nuclear Structure and Dynamics in France; Madhavi Kadakia, Ph.D., presented and chaired a session at the International p63/p73 workshop in Japan, and at the University of Mumbai; and Julian Gomez-Cambronero, Ph.D., presented at the International Symposium on Biological Regulation and Enzyme Activity in Normal and Neoplastic Tissues in Bologna, Italy, and at the Center de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa and University of Madrid.
  • The Clinical Lab Science program was the only four-year program in the region for training students, meeting a critical need for area hospitals.

Objective C
Offer degree and other education programs consistent with regional and state needs.

  • Through its new minor in Emergency Management, the Department of Kinesiology and Health partnered with National Center for Medical Readiness at Calamityville.
  • The Department of Physics established a dual-course enrollment for the college physics sequence with the Dayton Regional STEM School.
  • The Biomedical Sciences Program re-implemented and revitalized the M.D./Ph.D. Dual Degree Program.

GOAL 5

VALUED RESOURCES

Develop and sustain the human, financial and physical resources required to accomplish the university’s strategic goals.

Objective A
Encourage and support the professional development and wellness of faculty and staff.

  • Christopher Wyatt, Ph.D., won the President’s Award for Early Career Achievement.
  • Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology houses the Confocal and Microscopy core facility, a vital university resource.

Objective C
Generate increased revenue.

  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology faculty received Department of Defense and National Science Foundation funding to purchase DNA sequencers capable of sequencing a person’s genome. 

Objective D
Increase investments in facilities/technologies to achieve strategic goals.

  • The Matthew O. Diggs III Laboratory for Life Science Research received a Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council. The Diggs Lab was the first laboratory in Ohio to receive the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-NC Gold status.
  • Department of Biological Sciences faculty and students modified the university’s long-range plan to better protect the campus woods.
  • The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences secured the donation of $10 million in software from Schlumberger Limited, allowing students to work with industry-standard software and giving them a competitive edge for jobs in energy exploration and environmental engineering.
  • The Pre-Health Program website was created to provide valuable information for students pursuing careers in health care and opportunities for networking.
  • The Department of Psychology increased its grant funding from $1 million to $3 million.